Tag Archives: advertising

How advertisers convinced Americans they smelled bad

It was an enterprising schoolgirl and a traveling bible salesman in 1919. They couldn’t get ladies to use antiperspirants until they made them feel bad. The strategy was to encourage them to be insecure, from Smithsonian Magazine:

Perspiration as a social faux pas that nobody would directly tell you was responsible for your unpopularity, but which they were happy to gossip behind your back about.

Reading more like a lyrical public service announcement than an advert:

A woman’s arm! Poets have sung of it, great artists have painted its beauty. It should be the daintiest, sweetest thing in the world. And yet, unfortunately, it’s isn’t always.

 

It worked and sales boomed. The next step was to convince men they needed it. Can you guess how they did that?

Read Sarah Everts full article to find out.

 

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Have you heard of Social Advertising? — It’s the next big thing in online ads

A possible shift in the advertising landscape?

From an email Jonah Peretti, the CEO of Buzzfeed, sent out to employees and investors:

 

This same lucky shift made our business model work for the first time.  A couple years ago, we were trying unsuccessfully to sell social advertising to a market that only wanted to buy banners but things have changed dramatically since then.  Now many agencies and brands are refusing to buy banners, companies that rely on traditional display units are suffering, and budgets are shifting rapidly to social advertising. One of our board members, who was initially skeptical of our decision to not run banners, recently said that “social advertising will be the biggest media business since cable television.” Times have changed.

 

Which begs the question, what is social advertising?

 

“In social advertising, ads are targeted based on underlying social networks and their content is tailored with information that pertains to the social relationship.” – Catherine Tucker, Cornell

 

“Whereas in traditional, non-social, advertising the ad is targeted based on what it knows about the individual person (cookies) or the individual page (keywords).” – Wikipedia

 

 

Examples of Social Advertising from Facebook, Buzzfeed:

 

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Foursquare launches promoted updates – now all social networks have ads in your news feed

It’s official, all the social networking sites have started adding “promoted” tweets/posts/places to your news feed. It’s no surprise considering that Twitter, with its “promoted tweets,” recently said it has a “truckload of money in the bank”.

 

Today Foursquare is launching its version of search ads, Promoted Updates.

Promoted Updates operate like Google’s promoted listings or Twitter’s promoted tweets. They are pay-per-action ad placements that only appear when a user is searching for a venue in Foursquare’s Explore tab.

Foursquare determines a user’s current location and check-in history before displaying a Promoted Update. The ads are powered by the same recommendation engine as its Explore feature. All of the paid placements will be clearly labeled at the top of the feed; they can include a store’s recent news, photos or specials.

Foursquare has partnered with about 20 merchants, from small mom and pop shops to national chains like Best Buy, to launch the pilot program. In the next few months, Foursquare hopes to turn Promoted Updates into a self-service tool merchants of all sizes can use on its platform.

 

Keep reading: Business Insider - Foursquare Launches Promoted Updates, Its Newest Effort To Generate Revenue

 

 

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YouTube is finally making money – lot’s of it!

Is Google making money off of YouTube? You betcha, Google execs told shareholders today, without offering the slightest bit of detail. Par for the course.

So, in lieu of real numbers from Google, here’s a Wall Street estimate: Google is making a ton of money from YouTube.

More specifically: The video site should generate more than $3.6 billion in gross revenue this year, says Citi’s Mark Mahaney. After distributing some of that to partners, Google probably records net revenue of $2.4 billion, he says.

Why is he even more optimistic now?

Basically, because YouTube’s traffic continues to grow, even though it’s already ginormous — comScore has it posting 20 percent growth, quarter after quarter. And because Google is sticking more ads on more videos

His 2012 revenue estimate “is likely 50% greater than Yahoo!’s Display Advertising total and right-in-line with Netflix’s total subscription revenue.”

Via - All Things D

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YouTube opens Partner Program so everyone can make money from their videos

Ever thought of being a movie star or perhaps an internet-sensation?

Well, YouTube just opened it’s doors to you. They have a Partner Program designed to turn you into a skilled creator of popular videos, and get paid for it too:

YouTube has now announced that its expanding the eligibility to the program across the twenty countries that it’s available in, meaning it’s not just those with the popular videos who are invited to join the scheme.

The YouTube Partner Program is currently available in Argentina, Australia, Brazil, Canada, Colombia, Czech Republic, France, Germany, Ireland, Israel, Japan, Mexico, Netherlands, New Zealand, Poland, South Africa, Spain, Sweden, United Kingdom and the United States.

“We’re excited to provide more creators with the opportunity to become partners and have access to programs and resources to help them be successful on YouTube,” said YouTube in the announcement.

Prior to this, the program was only open to producers of the most popular video content, who could gain additional privileges and choose to run advertising on their videos in return for a share of the spoils. But now it’s open to anyone who’s up for making some dollars from their finely crafted videos.

via The Next Web

So break out your talented toddlers, dogs, and cats, but beware of the coming onslaught of video-advertising.

The digital divide – newspapers are completely lost

Online advertising is booming. Already a $32 billion business, advertisers are expected to spend a full $62 billion online in 2016. But news publishers are not poised to cash in on the growth, a report released Monday by the Pew Research Center suggests.

The problem? News publishers’ online advertising products simply aren’t competitive. Most tend to depend on static, un-targeted banner advertisements, making their products less desirable than the highly targeted advertisements offered by the likes of Facebook and Google.

Among the other findings:

  • 21% of ads on an online news site are for the news organization’s own products.
  • By category, the financial industry is the largest spender in online news advertising (18%), followed by cosmetics and toiletries (5%).
  • Most ads are static banner ads. Rich media and video ads are rare.
  • Few legacy print customers are moving to digital

via Mashable

A detailed study that shows newspapers losing $7 from print for every digital $1, without even a sense of how they are addressing a key aspect of that transition. It’s an unfortunate vacuum.

One exec bluntly states, “There’s no doubt we’re going out of business right now.”

via paidContent

 

This unfortunate state of affairs is costing the newspapers $25 billion this year and success stories are rare. One success I was able to find comes the The Atlantic magazine, a much smaller company pulling in $18 million in advertising.

The Atlantic survived by reimagining itself as a digital product

How did a 153-year-old magazine — one that first published the “Battle Hymn of the Republic” and gave voice to the abolitionist and transcendentalist movements — reinvent itself for the 21st century?

By pretending it was a Silicon Valley start-up that needed to kill itself to survive.

The Atlantic is on track to turn a tidy profit of $1.8 million this year. That would be the first time in at least a decade that it had not lost money.

Getting there took a cultural transfusion, a dose of counterintuition and a lot of digital advertising revenue.

“We imagined ourselves as a venture-capital-backed start-up in Silicon Valley whose mission was to attack and disrupt The Atlantic,” said Justin B. Smith, president of the Atlantic Media Company.

What that meant more than anything else was forcing one of the nation’s oldest magazines to stop thinking of itself as a printed product.

via NY Times

 

The article is from December, 2010, but still worth reading if the topic interests you (death of newspapers, magazines).

It’s worth noting that The Atlantic is continuing its heroic transformation:

October, 2011:

For the 12th consecutive quarter, The Atlantic is reporting gains in print and online revenue. In third quarter 2011, overall advertising revenue is up 19 percent. – Folio

The Atlantic‘s online ad revenue exceeded its print ad revenue for the first time…even more interestingly, October’s 51% digital advertising share doesn’t come from a decline in print revenue. According to Lauf, The Atlantic sold more ads in the October issue of the magazine than it had since 1999. – The Next Web

 

 

Learn how the rest of the industry is faring – Newspapers are losing $25 billion in revenue in 2011The digital divide – newspapers are completely lost.

Adsense funds creativity – big time! – Online advertisers spending 100s of millions

I pay attention to advertiser spending because it’s how I make my living. It’s also how Google has come to dominate the world, making $3 billion a month on advertising.

Which makes it all the more interesting to see who is funding all this. Here is the top ten list, in millions.

The top spender is IAC/InterActiveCorp, owner of Ask.com, Match.com, Citysearch and other companies that depend on buying long-tail search terms in bulk.

The numbers don’t include the fourth quarter, typically the heaviest for advertising in general and particularly for search.

Google’s top 20 biggest advertisers via Ad Age

The origin of Steve Jobs turtlenecks

I was looking at this incredible collection of Apple Computer ads and noticed that the very first one in 1977 has this smart-looking fellow in a turtleneck. Scroll down to the second ad from 1977 and there it is, another turtleneck.

Lol, right, at least they’re not black. Maybe Steve Jobs was more colorful in those early days? After these two ads no turtleneck ever appeared in an Apple ad (as far as I can tell). I’m guessing some one took over the marketing from Steve…

if you really like these ads then take a look at this September 1977 issue of Scientific American. It has some awesome detail on the first ad, “Start by playing PONG. Then invent your own games using the input keyboard…”