Amazon strikes another blow on publishing industry – $20 million for audiobooks

Amazon continues to upset the publishing industry, this time going around publishers to offer authors $20 million for going audio. If an author is willing to let Audible, the Amazon-owned audiobook powerhouse, sell their book then Amazon will give them $1 per book:

The Amazon-owned digital audiobooks site Audible.com is launching a new program, “Audible Author Services,” that pays audiobook authors $1 per sale through Audible.com, Audible.co.uk, and iTunes, out of a $20 million fund. The audiobook publishers do not receive any of the funds.

To sign up, authors must make their titles available as audiobooks through Audible.com. Once they enroll their books in the program, Audible says, they will:

  • Receive an honorarium of $1 per unit sold.
  • Obtain samples and links from Audible for use in social media, blogs, or on their websites.
  • Gain direct interaction with Audible marketing and merchandising teams; and
  • Obtain a free copy of their audiobook from Audible.

via Paid Content

All of this amidst a Department of Justice probe into e-book price-fixing that charged many major publishing houses and Apple, yet, conspicuously left Amazon out.

It certainly does appear that Amazon has a death wish for certain areas of the publishing industry and is largely succeeding at that.

Now playing on YouTube – pay-per-view shows

When I think of pay-per-view my mind automatically races to all the Wrestlemania’s and Royal Rumble’s I watched as a kid. With this new announcement by YouTube there is a chance they will be returning:

YouTube is adding monetization options to its live streaming platform, including the ability for publishers to charge for live events. The new feature was announced on YouTube’s publisher blog Tuesday.

YouTube has been experimenting with pay-per-view for select publishers. Making the option more widely available could make YouTube’s live streaming more attractive to other sports and entertainment publishers.

Of course, YouTube isn’t the only one to offer paid live streaming: Ustream and others have been offering publishers a way to charge for events for some time.

learn moreGigaOm

 

I was able to find a pay-per-view event on YouTube, a UFC fight for $44.99:

The most highly-anticipated light heavyweight title fight of all-time comes to Atlanta on Saturday, April 21st, as UFC 205-pound champion Jon “Bones” Jones defends his crown for the third time against former title holder “Suga” Rashad Evans. They once were friends, but now the time has come for them to settle their grudge in the Octagon once and for all.

1:1 cost comparison of a tablet and textbook for elementary school children

 

From a report by the FCC that included the technology companies and textbook publishers. More details at AllThingsD

The digital divide – newspapers are completely lost

Online advertising is booming. Already a $32 billion business, advertisers are expected to spend a full $62 billion online in 2016. But news publishers are not poised to cash in on the growth, a report released Monday by the Pew Research Center suggests.

The problem? News publishers’ online advertising products simply aren’t competitive. Most tend to depend on static, un-targeted banner advertisements, making their products less desirable than the highly targeted advertisements offered by the likes of Facebook and Google.

Among the other findings:

  • 21% of ads on an online news site are for the news organization’s own products.
  • By category, the financial industry is the largest spender in online news advertising (18%), followed by cosmetics and toiletries (5%).
  • Most ads are static banner ads. Rich media and video ads are rare.
  • Few legacy print customers are moving to digital

via Mashable

A detailed study that shows newspapers losing $7 from print for every digital $1, without even a sense of how they are addressing a key aspect of that transition. It’s an unfortunate vacuum.

One exec bluntly states, “There’s no doubt we’re going out of business right now.”

via paidContent

 

This unfortunate state of affairs is costing the newspapers $25 billion this year and success stories are rare. One success I was able to find comes the The Atlantic magazine, a much smaller company pulling in $18 million in advertising.

Newspapers lose $25 billion in revenue – where did it go?

US newspaper publishers’ hopes that advertising revenues might be about to stabilise have been dashed by several pieces of research.

An analysis of data predicts that newspapers will achieve a new low in ad sales for 2011, with revenues expected to come in at about $24 billion this year (2011) – down from the record $49.4 billion achieved in 2005.

The last time newspaper revenues were this low was 1984.

via Greenslade

 

Although this was the year many publishers hoped the business would stabilize, sales continued to deteriorate alarmingly in almost every category in the first nine months:

  • Retail advertising dropped 8.8%.
  • Classifieds plunged 12.9%.
  • National advertising fell by a bit less than 11%.
  • The only bright spot was digital advertising, which climbed 8.3%.

This year was the year that many publishers believed an improving economy would halt, if not reverse, the revenue slide that commenced in the spring of 2006. Technically, the economy did rebound in 2011, but the uptick bypassed newspapers.

via Newsosaur

 

My heart goes out to all those in the industry.

With one question, where did $25 billion in lost revenue go. What multi-billion dollar industry has replaced it?

 

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It’s possible it went to the digital world, where newspapers are completely out of touch with only a few success stories.