Tag Archives: recommendation

Foursquare launches promoted updates – now all social networks have ads in your news feed

It’s official, all the social networking sites have started adding “promoted” tweets/posts/places to your news feed. It’s no surprise considering that Twitter, with its “promoted tweets,” recently said it has a “truckload of money in the bank”.

 

Today Foursquare is launching its version of search ads, Promoted Updates.

Promoted Updates operate like Google’s promoted listings or Twitter’s promoted tweets. They are pay-per-action ad placements that only appear when a user is searching for a venue in Foursquare’s Explore tab.

Foursquare determines a user’s current location and check-in history before displaying a Promoted Update. The ads are powered by the same recommendation engine as its Explore feature. All of the paid placements will be clearly labeled at the top of the feed; they can include a store’s recent news, photos or specials.

Foursquare has partnered with about 20 merchants, from small mom and pop shops to national chains like Best Buy, to launch the pilot program. In the next few months, Foursquare hopes to turn Promoted Updates into a self-service tool merchants of all sizes can use on its platform.

 

Keep reading: Business Insider - Foursquare Launches Promoted Updates, Its Newest Effort To Generate Revenue

 

 

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YouTube is dropping in monthly views – but gaining in “engagement”

YouTube is getting smaller in a metric that used to mean everything: views.

Since December, views on YouTube have dropped 28%, and March views are only slightly above what they were a year ago, startling for a site accustomed to breakneck growth.

It’s an intended consequence of the Google-owned site’s shift from…snack-size content to a full-fledged, couch-potato-optimized entertainment destination. At YouTube, the “view” is out and “engagement” is in.

YouTube’s focus has shifted from directing viewers to videos of skateboarding dogs to enticing them into longer, more engaging videos—the kind that are, not incidentally, more appealing to advertisers.

On March 15, YouTube altered its recommendation system to make the time spent with a video or channel a stronger indicator than a click.

“Our goal is we want users to watch more and click less”

It appears to be working. While views have dropped of late, the amount of minutes users spend watching YouTube has grown over the past year by 57%. The average length of a video view has grown a full minute to four minutes in the past year.

via AdAge

 


 
// Photo – Mark Sebastian

Chew – NY Times best seller about a Cibopath (one who gets psychic impressions from food)

Tony Chu is a cop with a secret. A weird secret. Tony Chu is Cibopathic, which means he gets psychic impressions from whatever he eats. It also means he’s a hell of a detective, as long as he doesn’t mind nibbling on the corpse of a murder victim to figure out whodunit, and why.

It’s a dirty job, and Tony has to eat terrible things in the name of justice. And if that wasn’t bad enough, the government has figured out Tony Chu’s secret. They have plans for him… whether he likes it or not.

Written by John Layman with brilliant art by Rob Guillory.

via Official Chew Blog

 

This comic book series about cops, crooks, cooks, cannibals and clairvoyants has won multiple awards including several Eisners (Academy Awards of Oscars) and is a NY Times best seller.

The series is about 25 books in and still as engaging and hilarious as ever. You will love it if you give it a chance. Start with the latest book on the shelves now, or pick up one of the anthologies.

Even better you can read the first issue online in two places. Via Newsarama, or if you want to create an account via Comixology (which has a superior viewer, hit log-in on top right).

The Intelligent Investor – by Benjamin Graham – "the best book on investing ever written"

The greatest investment advisor of the twentieth century, Benjamin Graham, taught and inspired people worldwide. Graham’s philosophy of “value investing” — which shields investors from substantial error and teaches them to develop long-term strategies — has made The Intelligent Investor the stock market bible ever since its original publication in 1949.

Over the years, market developments have proven the wisdom of Graham’s strategies. While preserving the integrity of Graham’s original text, this revised edition includes updated commentary by noted financial journalist Jason Zweig, whose perspective incorporates the realities of today’s market, draws parallels between Graham’s examples and today’s financial headlines, and gives readers a more thorough understanding of how to apply Graham’s principles.

The Intelligent Investor

 

“By far the best book on investing ever written.” – Warren Buffett

The Intelligent Investor – by Benjamin Graham – “the best book on investing ever written”

The greatest investment advisor of the twentieth century, Benjamin Graham, taught and inspired people worldwide. Graham’s philosophy of “value investing” — which shields investors from substantial error and teaches them to develop long-term strategies — has made The Intelligent Investor the stock market bible ever since its original publication in 1949.

Over the years, market developments have proven the wisdom of Graham’s strategies. While preserving the integrity of Graham’s original text, this revised edition includes updated commentary by noted financial journalist Jason Zweig, whose perspective incorporates the realities of today’s market, draws parallels between Graham’s examples and today’s financial headlines, and gives readers a more thorough understanding of how to apply Graham’s principles.

The Intelligent Investor

 

“By far the best book on investing ever written.” – Warren Buffett

Unknown to most modern-day investors and traders – Reminiscences of a Stock Operator is one of the most important investment books ever written

Like you I dream of investing in the stock market to make money. Not big money but simple 10% returns, year over year.

The trouble is that the market is so complex and confusing. It seems to take an infinite amount of time, research, and knowledge to make it work. To which, I respond, there has to be a book to explain it all to me.

A novel that encapsulates all I need to know into pithy, poignant statements. Offering a way to avoid all the simple mistakes and skip right to the business a making money.

I have found the first book of that kind for any investor, Reminiscences of a Stock Operator by Edwin Lefèvre.

Reviews:

The most important investment book for today’s investors isn’t on the hottest new trend–it’s a book written over 70 years ago. Originally published in 1923, Reminiscences of a Stock Operator continues to inspire each new generation of investors.

Unknown to most modern-day investors and traders. Reminiscences of a Stock Operator is one of the most important investment books ever written.

Although Reminiscences…was first published some seventy years ago, its take on crowd psychology and market timing is a s timely as last summer’s frenzy on the foreign exchange markets.

After twenty years and many re-reads, Reminiscences is still one of my all-time favorites.

Stock investing is a relatively recent phenomenon and the inventory of true classics is somewhat slim. When asked, people in the know will always list books by Graham, Malkiel, and Fisher. You’ll know you’re getting really good advice if they also mention Reminiscences of a Stock Operator by Edwin Lefèvre.

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New iPhone app: Stitcher Radio (finally a podcast subscription app!)

There is an awesome iPhone app I want to recommend to you called Stitcher Radio.

The key feature of this app is the ability to subscribe to podcasts. Avid listeners know that iTunes offers subscriptions and automatic downloads, but the iPhone doesn’t. For years we have had to individually look up our favorite shows, every day or week, and wondered when Apple would implement this feature.

Well, they haven’t and Stitcher is filling that gap.

The app works by having you create stations of your favorite shows. Search for the show you like, hit the star button to favorite, and then add it to your station. I started with one massive station but recently broke that down into specialized sections (sports, finance, culture).

Any new episode will be pulled in automatically, or you can manually do it by hitting the refresh button. A huge time saver for me because I really hate searching iTunes for the same shows over and over again.

There are only a few misses with this app. One is the auto-play feature which only plays in one direction. You cannot set repeat or keep playing this artist (great for listening to older episodes) because it only goes forward to the next artist. The other miss is the lack of an ability to listen in order of release date. If you want to find and listen to the newest shows in your station you will have to do that manually.

Regardless, this app is a great recommendation, I love it, and have listened to over 16 hours of podcasts on it!

Also, check out iTunes best of 2011 Podcasts.

Hugo in 3D – the perfect December movie

Hugo dazzlingly conjoins the earliest days of cinema with the very latest big-screen technology.

..this opulent adaptation of Brian Selznick’s extensively illustrated novel is ostensibly a children’s and family film, albeit one that will play best to sophisticated kids and culturally inclined adults.

Not sure which one I am a sophisticated kid or a culturally inclined adult?

No matter you should see this movie, indeed I may see it again, just for the 3D. It is absolutely mesmerizing from the multiple layers of snowfall over every outdoor shop to the depth of crowds inside the train station.

I haven’t seen such amazing work since Avatar and I daresay it’s even better. Add onto that a historical edge, filmmaking in Paris in the 1930s, and you have a delightful December movie.

For anyone remotely interested in film history, Hugo must be seen in 3D

The richness of detail and evident care that has been extended to all aspects of the production are of a sort possible only when a top director has a free hand to do everything he or she feels is necessary to entirely fulfill a project’s ambitions.

via THR