The Orange County Register sold to – 2100 Trust LLC – a Massachusetts-based venture

The owner of The Orange County Register announced today that the paper has been bought by 2100 Trust LLC, a privately-held company led by a Massachusetts investor who previously planned to buy The Boston Globe.

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Today’s announcement is the latest in a major sea change in U.S. newspaper ownership as the industry struggles to adapt to the Internet age following years of plunging ad revenues and declining circulation.

A whole new group of media players has entered the scene, the most notable of which is billionaire Warren Buffett whose company, Berkshire Hathaway, said last month it would pay $142 million for 63 Media General newspapers.

Southern California’s media landscape is also being remade. Last year, Douglas F. Manchester, a San Diego developer and hotelier, bought the Union-Tribune from Platinum Equity, a Beverly Hills private equity firm. Manchester told online website Voice of San Diego he paid more than $110 million for the paper.

Changes may also be in the works at the Los Angeles Times whose owner, the Tribune Co., is going through what is expected to be the final stages of a nearly four-year bankruptcy.

Many experts think the creditors who will take over Tribune Co. after the bankruptcy will sell off its various properties including the Times.

 

Read the full storyOrange County Register company bought by private firm

Also, read the family history of The O.C. Register founders – Hoiles: Dynasty to bankruptcy

The most popular media outlets by state – where is Fox News/NPR popular?

Forbes and Bitly pulled together a data set highlighting the most read newspapers by state. In some places certain media is read more than others. Can you guess where NPR is the most popular, or where Fox News is read the most?

 

The Media Map: Who’s reading what and where

News sources read and shared at above-average levels by state: 

  • NPR – Oregon
  • Fox News – Montana, Texas, Mississippi
  • The Onion – New Mexico, Minnesota, Wisconsin
  • MSNBC – Idaho, Alaska, Hawaii, North Dakota, Iowa
  • Huffington Post – KS, OK, LA, TN, WV, PA, DE
  • USA Today – NV, UT, AZ, CO, WY, MI, OH, MO, NC, SC, AL, GA, FL

 

I’ve always wondered why USA Today was so popular, well, 13 states have it as their favorite, above all other sources like N.Y. Times, NPR, & Fox.

After that, The Huffington Post is the second most loved.

 

Screenshot below, or view the interactive map on Forbes.

Continue reading The most popular media outlets by state – where is Fox News/NPR popular?

Warren Buffett buys 89 local newspapers – eschews larger publications

Warren Buffett made good Thursday on his promise to buy more newspapers, agreeing to buy 63 daily and weekly newspapers in the Southeast for $142 million from financially troubled Media General Inc. of Richmond, Va.

The newspapers, in Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Alabama and Florida, would be combined with the Omaha World-Herald Co. into a new Berkshire Hathaway Inc. division called BH Media Group. They would be managed by World Media Enterprises, a new sister company of The World-Herald.

“In towns and cities where there is a strong sense of community, there is no more important institution than the local paper,” said Buffett, chairman and CEO of Berkshire, in a press release. “The many locales served by the newspapers we are acquiring fall firmly in this mold, and we are delighted they have found a permanent home with Berkshire Hathaway.”

And Buffett said Thursday he may buy more newspapers.

via Omaha World-Herald

 

And, a week later he followed through:

Warren Buffett’s Berkshire Hathaway, Inc has announced it is purchasing 26 local papers, all locals. In a letter to the publishers, Buffett said that the papers would need to focus as much as possible on local issues rather than try to compete on national ones. More interestingly, Buffett weighed in on the perennial issue of whether newspapers can give away their news online:

“We must rethink the industry’s initial response to the Internet. The original instinct of newspapers then was to offer free in digital form what they were charging for in print. This is an unsustainable model and certain of our papers are already making progress in moving to something that makes more sense. We want your best thinking as we work out the blend of digital and print that will attract both the audience and the revenue we need.”

via The Verge

Continue reading Warren Buffett buys 89 local newspapers – eschews larger publications

Thousands of never-before-seen-photos from New York City – 100 years ago

New Yorkers cool off in the Astoria public pool with the Hell Gate railroad bridge looming in the background in the summer of 1940.
Murder most foul: A detective took this crime scene photo in 1918 after children found the body of Gaspare Candella stuffed in a drum and dumped in a field in Brooklyn, New York.

Continue reading Thousands of never-before-seen-photos from New York City – 100 years ago

The return of the newspaper barons – very rich (and political) owners

Folks with several hundred million dollars and outspoken opinions have been buying up newspapers. The Omaha Herald, San Diego Union Tribune, Portland Press Herald, and Philadelphia Inquirer.

At the end of last year, Warren E. Buffett bought The Omaha World-Herald through his company, Berkshire Hathaway. This would be the same Mr. Buffett who told his annual shareholder meeting in 2009 that newspapers faced “unending losses” and that he would not buy most of them “at any price.” Yet there he was, ponying up $200 million for a relatively small regional newspaper in Berkshire Hathaway’s hometown.

And he is not alone. Douglas F. Manchester, a very rich developer, bought The San Diego Union Tribune at about the same time, for a reported $110 million. At the end of last month, S. Donald Sussman, a hedge fund manager and philanthropist who is married to a congresswoman, Chellie Pingree, bought a stake in the company that owns The Portland Press Herald in Maine.

And then word came at the beginning of last week that a group of very rich, very influential Philadelphia businessmen — including George E. Norcross III, a Democratic power broker in Southern New Jersey, and Lewis Katz, the parking magnate — bought the Philadelphia Media Network, which owns The Inquirer, The Daily News and Philly.com.

via NY Times

What does this mean?

If you pull back a few thousand feet, you can see newspapers coming full circle. Before World War II, newspapers were mostly owned by political and business interests who used them to push an agenda.

People like William Randolph Hearst and Robert McCormick wielded their newspapers as cudgels to get their way. It was only when newspapers began making all kinds of money in the postwar era that they were professionalized and infused with editorial standards.

“We are going back to a form of ownership that dominated in an earlier era,” said Alan D. Mutter, a newspaper and technology consultant. “As newspapers become less impressive businesses, people are going to buy them as trophies or bully pulpits or some other form of personal expression.”

“People just have to be aware that other agendas exist”

Useful dog tricks

Presenting, Useful Dog Tricks!! Whoever said tricks can’t be useful? Jesse loves helping around the house, and I just love his happy attitude and smile on his face =o)

Jesse chooses to do the behaviors in this video, and has so much fun bringing smiles to people’s faces. He gets treats for doing his tricks, and enjoys learning new things. Tricks are just one of the activities we enjoy doing together. When not doing tricks, Jesse can be found playing with his cuz ball, chasing squeaker tennis balls, digging in search for lizards, de-fluffing stuffed toys, swimming, and accompanying me on outings.

~Heather and Jesse~

 

Thx to Christina Rollo

The state of media on the rez – American Indians in 2012

American Indians and Alaska Natives typically live in more rural and isolated locations of the United States, areas that generally have waited longer for internet broadband access. Many tribal lands still have only very limited connectivity.

As a result, many Native people have moved straight to mobile internet, accessing digital content through cellphones that do not require broadband connection.

Radio remains the most prevalent medium for this population and since 2009 new stations aimed at Native populations have gone on the air. Television also saw growth with the debut of a new Native station. Newspapers had a more mixed year.

The American Indian and Alaska Native population in the United States reached 5.2 million in 2010, or 1.7% of the total U.S. population. That is a growth of 1.1 million, or 26.7%, over the last 10 years, more than double the overall population growth of 9.7%, but still less than some other races.

Less than half of American Indians and Alaska Natives, 43%, have broadband access at home. The rate for the U.S. generally is 65%. The rate is also lower than rural Americans (50%) and other ethnicities (over two-thirds, 67%, of Asian Americans have broadband access at home as do 59% of African Americans and 49% of Hispanics).

via Pew’s – State of the News Media

The digital divide – newspapers are completely lost

Online advertising is booming. Already a $32 billion business, advertisers are expected to spend a full $62 billion online in 2016. But news publishers are not poised to cash in on the growth, a report released Monday by the Pew Research Center suggests.

The problem? News publishers’ online advertising products simply aren’t competitive. Most tend to depend on static, un-targeted banner advertisements, making their products less desirable than the highly targeted advertisements offered by the likes of Facebook and Google.

Among the other findings:

  • 21% of ads on an online news site are for the news organization’s own products.
  • By category, the financial industry is the largest spender in online news advertising (18%), followed by cosmetics and toiletries (5%).
  • Most ads are static banner ads. Rich media and video ads are rare.
  • Few legacy print customers are moving to digital

via Mashable

A detailed study that shows newspapers losing $7 from print for every digital $1, without even a sense of how they are addressing a key aspect of that transition. It’s an unfortunate vacuum.

One exec bluntly states, “There’s no doubt we’re going out of business right now.”

via paidContent

 

This unfortunate state of affairs is costing the newspapers $25 billion this year and success stories are rare. One success I was able to find comes the The Atlantic magazine, a much smaller company pulling in $18 million in advertising.

Newspapers lose $25 billion in revenue – where did it go?

US newspaper publishers’ hopes that advertising revenues might be about to stabilise have been dashed by several pieces of research.

An analysis of data predicts that newspapers will achieve a new low in ad sales for 2011, with revenues expected to come in at about $24 billion this year (2011) – down from the record $49.4 billion achieved in 2005.

The last time newspaper revenues were this low was 1984.

via Greenslade

 

Although this was the year many publishers hoped the business would stabilize, sales continued to deteriorate alarmingly in almost every category in the first nine months:

  • Retail advertising dropped 8.8%.
  • Classifieds plunged 12.9%.
  • National advertising fell by a bit less than 11%.
  • The only bright spot was digital advertising, which climbed 8.3%.

This year was the year that many publishers believed an improving economy would halt, if not reverse, the revenue slide that commenced in the spring of 2006. Technically, the economy did rebound in 2011, but the uptick bypassed newspapers.

via Newsosaur

 

My heart goes out to all those in the industry.

With one question, where did $25 billion in lost revenue go. What multi-billion dollar industry has replaced it?

 

Related Articles:

It’s possible it went to the digital world, where newspapers are completely out of touch with only a few success stories.

British Newspaper Archive – treasure trove of 3 million newspapers going back to the 1700s

I love these newspaper archives coming online. It’s like having a library in your home. The articles and pictures, the classifieds and political diatribes, it’s too fun.

When it comes to the British we have to separate our living memory from our British memory. We tend to think that American culture dominates the world but for 150 years it was the British. Think of Bram Stoker (Irish) and his Dracula, or Mary Shelley (British) and Frankenstein.

I’ve had some fun looking them up in the old newspapers as well as search terms like “tea time” and “British East India”. What did you come up with?

British Newspaper Archive

The one I found was from June 30, 1838, on the day of Queen Victoria’s coronation. You know the one played by Emily Blunt in the awesome movie, Young Victoria, and the person behind the “Victorian Era.”

“Her reign of 63 years and 7 months, which is longer than that of any other British monarch and the longest of any female monarch in history, is known as the Victorian era.

“It was a period of industrial, cultural, political, scientific, and military change within the United Kingdom, and was marked by a great expansion of the British Empire.”

From Wikipedia

Download the entire front page

Some screenshots from the newspaper:

Continue reading British Newspaper Archive – treasure trove of 3 million newspapers going back to the 1700s