Tag Archives: native

Progress in the Middle East – if you measure by the number of Facebook users

There are growing signs of progress in the Middle East, if you measure by the total number of Facebook users. That number has skyrocketed since 2010, going from 15 million to near 40 million.

Of those users, a growing number are starting to prefer using the site in their own native language, Arabic.

Of the 39+ million Arabic users on Facebook, 39% prefer to view the site in their native language, while 36% like it in English.

As more users in the region are coming online, with an obvious desire to access sites in Arabic, there is a rising demand for content that appeals to them, and quite a few social media sites are trying to meet that demand.

Twitter recently added support for right-to-left languages, including in Arabic, while Storify is working with a team of volunteers in the Middle East to translate their interface into Arabic.

Arabic is one of the fastest growing languages on sites like Twitter and Wikipedia, and with Yahoo having just licensed the technology behind smart transliteration tool Yamli, it is becoming increasingly easy for Arabic speakers to interact in their mother tongue online.

via The Next Web

 

The numbers are not overwhelming, by any means, considering that there are 152 million users in the U.S. and 232 million in Europe, but it is a positive sign.

 

// Photo – Sean MacEntee

Semi-definitive history of ‘online’ Pulitzer Prize winners

Steve Myers, of Poynter, researched these winners for his piece on Why it matters who won the first ‘online’ Pulitzer?

Interesting how he breaks down the nature of the work.

- Did it appear first in print or online?

- Was it created for the web or for print?

- How do print and web stories mesh to form one narrative?

 

Insightful for anyone hoping to achieve a Pulitzer Prize one-day…

 

A semi-definitive history of ‘online’ Pulitzers

2006, The Times-Picayune 
Print-native news outlet, mostly print-native work.

2006, The Sun Herald
Print-native news outlet, combination of print and digitally native work.

  • The Sun Herald’s entry for its Katrina coverage also was heavy on stories, but it included an extensive description of its online work: a news blog, frequent home page updates, photo galleries of damage (by its own photographers and from readers), forums that people used to get in touch with one another, and an interactive map of damaged areas.

2008, The Washington Post

Print-native news outlet, combination of print and digitally native work.

  • News stories comprised the bulk of the Post’s entry for its coverage of the Virginia Tech shooting, but the Post also included a description of how it had developed its online coverage throughout the day. It started with an initial, one-line report of a gunman on campus and later included stories with fatality counts, an audio report, live Internet radio, cell phone videos and user submissions.

2009, The New York Times
Print-native news outlet, mix of print and digitally native work.

 

Read the complete list at Poynter.

The state of media on the rez – American Indians in 2012

American Indians and Alaska Natives typically live in more rural and isolated locations of the United States, areas that generally have waited longer for internet broadband access. Many tribal lands still have only very limited connectivity.

As a result, many Native people have moved straight to mobile internet, accessing digital content through cellphones that do not require broadband connection.

Radio remains the most prevalent medium for this population and since 2009 new stations aimed at Native populations have gone on the air. Television also saw growth with the debut of a new Native station. Newspapers had a more mixed year.

The American Indian and Alaska Native population in the United States reached 5.2 million in 2010, or 1.7% of the total U.S. population. That is a growth of 1.1 million, or 26.7%, over the last 10 years, more than double the overall population growth of 9.7%, but still less than some other races.

Less than half of American Indians and Alaska Natives, 43%, have broadband access at home. The rate for the U.S. generally is 65%. The rate is also lower than rural Americans (50%) and other ethnicities (over two-thirds, 67%, of Asian Americans have broadband access at home as do 59% of African Americans and 49% of Hispanics).

via Pew’s – State of the News Media