A stunning light installation for 75th anniversary of the Bay Bridge in San Francisco

For the 75th anniversary of San Francisco’s Bay Bridge the city is installing a world-class art installation. It will feature 25,000 white LED lights strung all across the bridge – some 1.5 miles wide and 500 feet high. And will be on display from February 2013-2015.

An artist rendition:

 

 

The artist is Leo Villareal who creates pieces composed exclusively of light. One of them is on permanent display at the National Gallery of Art in Washington D.C.:

 

 

Continue reading A stunning light installation for 75th anniversary of the Bay Bridge in San Francisco

The Beekeeper – “first time in my life when I’ve felt absolutely on the right path”

Local farmer Megan Paska has witnessed beekeeping as it morphed from an illegal (and possibly crazy) habit to a sustainable, community-supported skill. Mirroring beekeeping’s own ascendance, she found more than just a living: “This is the first time in my life when I’ve just felt absolutely on the right path.”

thisismadebyhand.com
brooklynhomesteader.com
growingchefs.org
rooftopfarms.org
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crewcuts.com

Etsy raises $40 million funding – giving craftrepreneurs an international marketplace

Etsy has closed $40 million of funding from a roster of investors who have been believers in Etsy for a long time. I couldn’t be happier to have such a committed set of partners who “get it” along for the next stage.

What do we plan to do with the money we’ve raised? Two simple things, really: we plan to grow Etsy into an economic force all around the world and we want to provide more products and services to help sellers succeed and build their businesses on the Etsy platform. You’ve seen a start in some of these areas — our Etsy in German and French launches…

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Looking back, Etsy was quite small by today’s measures — the community sold $7.93 million of goods in September 2008. We had about 50 employees and we were in an office in downtown Brooklyn with a broken elevator that famously had a sign that read, “You gotta press up to go down.”

Almost four years later, many things have changed. We have different offices near the Brooklyn Bridge, a working elevator, almost 300 employees, and last month alone, the community sold about $65 million in goods. Each month, 40 million people around the world visit Etsy, with 15 million registered members and 875,000 sellers generating those sales in 150 countries.

(2011 sales – $525 million)

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We believe, more than ever, that Etsy can help fundamentally change the way the world works by making it possible for individuals to make and sell things to other people around the globe — a people-powered economy.

…we published last fall provides an inspiring blueprint for the better world that we envision:

Decades of an unyielding focus on economic growth and a corporate mentality has left us ever more disconnected with nature, our communities, and the people and processes behind the objects in our lives. We think this is unethical, unsustainable, and unfun. However, with the rise of small businesses around the world we feel hope and see real opportunities: Opportunities for us to measure success in new ways… to build local, living economies, and most importantly, to help create a more permanent future.

via – Etsy News

Continue reading Etsy raises $40 million funding – giving craftrepreneurs an international marketplace

Thousands of never-before-seen-photos from New York City – 100 years ago

New Yorkers cool off in the Astoria public pool with the Hell Gate railroad bridge looming in the background in the summer of 1940.
Murder most foul: A detective took this crime scene photo in 1918 after children found the body of Gaspare Candella stuffed in a drum and dumped in a field in Brooklyn, New York.

Continue reading Thousands of never-before-seen-photos from New York City – 100 years ago

Vin Scully – the Dodgers gave spread-out Los Angeles its core

When Vin Scully arrived from Brooklyn with the Dodgers for the 1958 season, he found Los Angeles to be lacking a core.

“When I came to Los Angeles, all I knew was that it was like 450 square miles. There was no ‘there.’ I felt Los Angeles did not have a centerpiece.”

The opening of Dodger Stadium in 1962 changed that.

“In a sense, Dodger Stadium put the ‘there’ in Los Angeles,” Scully said. “I believe the stadium helped to reunite this spacious community that extends from here to there.”

The stadium opened exactly 50 years ago Tuesday, and the Hall of Fame broadcaster shared his thoughts and memories of the ballpark in a recent interview:

The now-extinct dugout seats:

“Now, I was told this was absolutely true: Giants-Dodgers game, late in the game, Giants rallying, crowd going bananas, Willie Mays in the on-deck circle and all that stuff, Willie McCovey going to hit in back of him, and Milton Berle, a comedian, is sitting in a dugout seat.

“Now, Mays is going to come up. And as Mays started to walk up to the plate, Berle hollered, ‘Willie!’ Mays looked over and recognized Berle. Berle said, ‘Come here a minute.’ Willie actually started, instinctively, to come over and realized, ‘What am I, crazy? I’m in the middle of a game!’

“Doris Day used to love those seats. She was a sweet lady. You would see her a lot. Cary Grant, when he was married to Dyan Cannon, they would sit in those dugout seats.”

Construction insight from longtime owner Peter O’Malley:

“Mr. O’Malley pointed out an interesting thing that I never thought of. They were building the stadium and he said, ‘The most expensive seats are the cheapest to install. And the cheapest seats are the most expensive to install.’

“He said, ‘The box seat is the most expensive. It’s right on the ground. The cheapest seat is way the hell up there. Just think of all the steel and concrete and everything else you need to put that seat way up there.’ ”

for many more excerpts form the best announcer in baseball…For Vin Scully, the view from Dodger Stadium never gets old

 

// Photos – KLA4067, Woolenium

Now is the easiest time since Prohibition to start a distillery

In our inaugural film, we visit the Breuckelen Distilling Company, the first gin distiller in Brooklyn since prohibition. Founder Brad Estabrooke talks about starting from nothing and the imperfect process of perfecting a craft.

“It was challenging to get people to take me seriously. ‘Hey, I just got laid-off from my job and I have a little bit of money. I want to start a distillery.”

 

DIRECTED AND PRODUCED BY – Keith “keef” Ehrlich

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY – Joshua Kraszewski

EDITOR – Matt Shapiro

TITLE DESIGN – Mandy Brown

MUSIC – Roman Zeitlin

SOUND RECORDIST – Robert Albrecht

RE-RECORDING MIXER – Nicholas Montgomery

SPECIAL THANK – Brad Estabrooke, Breuckelen Distilling Co.

 

Made by Hand – films to promote that which is made locally, sustainably, and with a love for craft.