Tag Archives: new york

CNN profile of a couple moving from a 1,500 to 168-square foot home

There are many who dream of owning the smallest home they can find; a strong reaction to those who dream of owning a two-story mini-mansion. Here is a CNN profile of a young couple who did just that – moving their two kids, cat and dog into a 168 square foot home (on 3 acres of land):

“The things we have are beautiful, enriching our tiny space. We got rid of so much and kept the beautiful things,” Hazi Berzins said. “Freeing ourselves from consumer debt and living mortgage-free has cleared the clutter to help us see what is truly important: our relationships, our happiness, each moment.”

And Mayor Michael Bloomberg agrees – or he wants to improve the city’s studios – as he announced a contest to design and build 1.8 million studios in Manhattan. Each unit is to be less than 300-square feet and contain a kitchen and bathroom.

New Yorkers love their studios, young quirky families love their tiny homes, how about you – do you enjoy your small or large space?

 

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N.Y. Times is now supported by readers, not advertisers

The New York Times Is Now Supported by Readers, Not Advertisers

At the company’s big three papers — the New York TimesInternational Herald Tribune, and Boston Globe — print and digital ad dollars dipped 6.6 percent to $220 million, while circulation revenue was up 8.3 percent to $233 million. The historical rebalancing may indicate a sea change in an industry that has long relied on advertising to stay afloat.

 

An interesting fact all by itself. Sending my mind along multiple future paths for the newspaper. Will readership shrink as it goes from free to paid? Can it still be the paper of record if it’s behind a paywall? Are they just forcing freeloading readers to go elsewhere?

It did send me to the Los Angeles Times, San Diego Union-Tribune, and, ironically, to social media for alternate news sources.

Though, I do have a bone to pick with one of the closing statements in the article, “…no longer depend on ad revenue, but must rely more than ever on the whims of the customer.”

I would have thought being free of advertisers to be a positive move. Is this a ‘thing’ in the newspaper industry that readers are so whimsical?

And, why does the New York media always have to insult its readers?

 

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Maps of where Olympic athletes are born and where they move to

The map above shows the birthplace of the 500 athletes the United States sent to the London 2012 Summer Olympic Games. The break down:

  • 9 percent (43 athletes) – are from Los Angeles
  • 3.6 percent (17) – are from the Bay Area
  • 3 percent (14) – are from greater New York
  • 2.3 percent (11) from Dallas.
  • 8 percent were born abroad

This map shows where these athletes are currently living:

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National Geographic premieres new show – Comic Store Heroes

This is Comic Store Heroes, a wild and wacky adventure into the subculture of comic book super fans, where dreams are everything… and with a bit of faith and spandex, they really can come true.

Amid the dark and dangerous shadows of New York, the real life Gotham City, shines a bright light that lures comic fans from every corner: America’s largest comic store, Midtown Comics. While dealing with eccentric super fans, daily battles for geekdom supremacy, men dressed as bananas, and one million customers a year, boss Gerry is also preparing for the biggest day of his comic year – New York Comic Con. And it’s just six weeks away!

So he’s put his main men, Thor “The Marketeer” and Alex “The Negotiator” on the case. Thor has to track down a comic celebrity to appear at the store’s Comic Con booth, while Alex has to buy 10,000 old comics from super-collectors to then sell at the Con as well as completing a personal mission for his boss: finding Gerry’s elusive holy grail comic, “Hot Stuff, The Little Devil No.1″. This was the first comic Gerry ever read as a kid, and without it Midtown Comics wouldn’t exist. As an incentive, Gerry has offered Alex a cash bonus if he finds it. But it’s gonna be a hell of a challenge – it’s one of the rarest comics in the world!

Comic Store Heroes, premiered Friday, July 13th at 8P et/pt.

 

Source: National Geographic Blog

 

 

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New York City artisan shop begins selling tap water – filtered by $25,000 machine, ultraviolet rays

New York is known for its food niche stores: The Hummus Place. The Doughnut Plant. The Dumpling Man. Even a spot dedicated solely to rice pudding.

But this week, a store in the East Village went a step further: It sells New York City tap water.

Not just any tap water, insist the owners of Molecule. They say the water streams through a $25,000 filtering machine that uses ultraviolet rays, ozone treatments and reverse osmosis in a seven-stage processing treatment to create what they call pure H20.

“I mean it’s subtle, but if you have a sensitive palate you can totally tell” the difference, said co-owner Adam Ruhf.

Water quality has long been a point of pride for New Yorkers, touted by Mayor Michael Bloomberg as one of the city’s signature distinctions.

The owners of Molecule vehemently disagree.

 

Keep reading: Wall Street Journal - What Are They Drinking in New York City?

 

 

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Surfline adds 34 new/upgraded cameras to its lineup – from Ireland to CA, NC

Surfline has added/upgraded 34 cams in the last five months with many more to come.

Make sure you check back because there’s a good chance there will be a new or upgraded cam near you.

 

NEW HD CAMS
Beacons, CA (Feb 2012)
Oceanside Pier SS, CA (April 2012)
Salt Creek, CA (Jan 2012)
Ponce Inlet, FL (April 2012)

 

UPGRADED HD CAMS
Mission Beach, CA (May 2012)
Cardiff, CA (Jan 2012)
Grandview, CA (Feb 2012)
The Wedge, CA (June 2012)
Goldenwest, CA (March 2012)
Casino Pier, NJ (April 2012)
North End, VA (March 2012)
Rodanthe, NC (May 2012)

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11 documentaries about cities – streaming on Netflix

Here are 11 new and new-ish documentaries now streaming that offer interesting, frustrating and downright sad stories about cities.

 

Bill Cunningham New York
2010, 84 minutes
Directed by Richard Press

A film about octogenarian and New York Times fashion photographer Bill Cunningham, who rides his bike around New York City taking pictures of clothes and the people – both ordinary and extraordinary – who wear them. A unique look at the changing fashions of one of the world’s centers of culture.

 

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The Innovation Whiteboard – get your idea published in the New York Times

What innovations have you made in your daily life? Whether it’s a gadget you’ve fashioned, or something less tangible, we want to hear about it. Your submissions will be published on nytimes.com and may be featured in the New York Times Magazine if our judges — Martha Stewart, James Dyson, Paola Antonelli and Ben Kaufman — select your idea. Submit now:

Innovation Whiteboard

For a special issue on June 3, we invite you to share an innovation that you have made in your daily life. Maybe you’ve figured out a way to make waking up more pleasant by jury-rigging your alarm clock. Or maybe you’ve invented a foolproof method for shining your shoes, or for finding time to exercise. It could be a gadget you’ve fashioned, or something less tangible. We want to hear what you’ve come up with.

To be published in the June 3 issue.

Submissions will be accepted until May 7 at 9 a.m. Eastern time.

 

// Thx to Neville Hobson, Photo – Seth1492

Thousands of never-before-seen-photos from New York City – 100 years ago

New Yorkers cool off in the Astoria public pool with the Hell Gate railroad bridge looming in the background in the summer of 1940.
Murder most foul: A detective took this crime scene photo in 1918 after children found the body of Gaspare Candella stuffed in a drum and dumped in a field in Brooklyn, New York.

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Hulu participates in TV’s upfronts – internet television has finally arrived

Just a few years ago Hulu, the online television site, was something of a novelty. A lot of people knew about it and watched it, but it was just another website. That all changes this week as Hulu participates in “upfronts”.

Hulu is in this position because of some staggering numbers:

  • Revenue of $420 million in 2011 (compared to $263 million in 2010)
  • 38 million visitors/month
  • 1.5 billion video ads shown to viewers in February
  • 2 million subscribers for their $8/month service

This all adds up to a gamechanger for the industry. The studio heads who originally created Hulu want to kill it, or at least sell it. They know that it’s taking away viewers from traditional television and offering better advertising:

“On a one-to-one basis, advertising placed on Hulu for our clients was more effective than advertising placed on television for the same programming,” said Steven J. Farella, chief executive at TargetCast TCM.

Additionally, Hulu collects vastly more data on viewers and can offer ads specifically targeted to them.

“Stoking envy among traditional television executives, the Web site collects a trove of data on its users’ preferences in programming and ads.”

At this point, it’s too late for the studios sell or kill it, though they did try all last year. Instead, they are inviting it to the table to see if it can compete on its own. Which means participating in the full cycle of television from pilot episodes, to full series, and selling all that to advertisers.

The most critical point being the “upfronts”:

At a presentation on Thursday in New York, Hulu, will pitch advertisers on original programming in an annual ritual known as upfronts that are typically reserved for cable channels and network broadcasters.

Hulu executives are expected to take the stage to sell advertisers on new series. The executives will also promote the service’s desirable demographic of young viewers who turn to Hulu for popular network sitcoms like “New Girl” and “Family Guy,” available only after they are broadcast on Fox.

So, like Netflix, Hulu is making a push into original series. It has also licensed 13 television shows that will appear exclusively online.

Traditional television is still the dominant game in town, but Hulu and Netflix are at the table now, and they have the internet on their side. With offerings like on-demand, full series at once, mobility, fewer commercials, and lower prices, you can expect all of this to quickly change the balance of power.

 

read more about upfronts at the NY Times