Tag Archives: statistics

How Linkedin gets 20x more money per user than Facebook

Forbes has LinkedIn CEO Jeff Weiner on the cover—but the professional social network’s business model is the real hero of the story.

Here are some of the amazing statistics Forbes’ George Anders reports:

  • LinkedIn users spend an average of 18 minutes a month on the site. Facebook users spend 6.4 hours a month.
  • But LinkedIn gets $1.30 in revenue for every hour those users spend on site. Facebook: 6.2 cents.
  • Anders describes LinkedIn’s most expensive product offering, LinkedIn Recruiter, as a “Bloomberg terminal” for talent scouts. It costs up to $8,200 a year per “seat,” or user license.
  • Adobe, a big LinkedIn customer, has 70 seats. At list prices, that’s about half a million in revenue a year from a single client.
  • LinkedIn’s top salespeople make as much as $400,000 a year selling Recruiter.
  • LinkedIn spends 33 percent of revenue on sales and marketing.
  • LinkedIn’s profits are expected to double this year to $70 million.

 

Via - How LinkedIn Gets TWENTY Times More Money Per User Than Facebook

 

**Note: Facebook’s profit in the last quarter was $205 million on revenue of $1.1 billion.

 

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Real-time stats revolutionized journalism – what will they do to books?

It takes the average reader just seven hours to read the final book in Suzanne Collins’s “Hunger Games” trilogy on the Kobo e-reader—about 57 pages an hour. Nearly 18,000 Kindle readers have highlighted the same line from the second book in the series: “Because sometimes things happen to people and they’re not equipped to deal with them.” And on Barnes & Noble’s Nook, the first thing that most readers do upon finishing the first “Hunger Games” book is to download the next one.

In the past, publishers and authors had no way of knowing what happens when a reader sits down with a book. Does the reader quit after three pages, or finish it in a single sitting? Do most readers skip over the introduction, or read it closely, underlining passages and scrawling notes in the margins? Now, e-books are providing a glimpse into the story behind the sales figures, revealing not only how many people buy particular books, but how intensely they read them.

For centuries, reading has largely been a solitary and private act, an intimate exchange between the reader and the words on the page. But the rise of digital books has prompted a profound shift in the way we read, transforming the activity into something measurable and quasi-public.

 

The full storyYour E-Book Is Reading You

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United Nations has gone mobile – so many apps for world peace and development

The United Nations has gone mobile…in a big way. In just a few clicks I found more than 10 iPhone apps covering everything from news to statistics to global photos.

Plus, a very cool short video about the apps from Jess3:

 

I’ve just downloaded all these apps and haven’t yet played with them, so no recommendations yet. Let me know if you have any suggestions or tips:

 
 
Pieces of Peace

The app makes it easy to get involved and includes some innovative (and fun) ways to learn about the work of the United Nations. An interactive photo-scramble game, “Pieces of Peace,” gives users the ability to have fun while they learn by unscrambling photos taken around the world that are related to the work of the UN. The game includes ways for users to learn as they play, helping build awareness and knowledge about international issues. Integrated social media options also allow users to organically share this content with friends, brag about their photo-unscrambling prowess, and encourage them to get involved.
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The rise of e-reading in America

28% of Americans age 18 and older own at least one specialized device for e-book reading – either a tablet or an e-book reader.

The holiday season saw a huge boost in ownership for both e-readers and tablets. Both jumped 9%, meaning that nearly one in ten Americans received a device over the holidays.

The average reader of e-books says she has read 24 books in the past 12 months, compared with an average of 15 books by a non-e-book consumer.

78% of those ages 16 and older say they read a book in the past 12 months.

Overall, those who reported reading the most books in the past year include: women compared with men; whites compared with minorities; well-educated Americans compared with less-educated Americans; and those age 65 and older compared with younger age groups.

30% of those who read e-content say they now spend more time reading, and owners of tablets and e-book readers particularly stand out as reading more now. 

The longer people have owned an e-book reader or tablet, the more likely they are to say they are reading more.

The prevalence of e-book reading is markedly growing, but printed books still dominate the world of book readers. 

In our December 2011 survey, we found that 72% of American adults had read a printed book and 11% listened to an audiobook in the previous year, compared with the 17% of adults who had read an e-book.

There are four times more people reading e-books on a typical day now than was the case less than two years ago.

10x more stats at – The rise of e-reading, Pew Internet

 

And, a fun ending:

Why people like to read. 

Since the recession began in 2006 – blogging has exploded, growing 500%

Do you ever wonder how many millions of people, before the days of the internet, kept journals?

Do you think the numbers would compare to the millions who are now blogging, tweeting, and social networking…

On to the real story:

Millions More Bloggers and Blog Readers

Here is another interesting fact about the recession. Since it began in 2006, the number of blogs in the world has risen from 36 million to 173 million. That is a near 5x growth.

Do you think that has any relation the recession or is just a correlation?

That same data shows that 2x as many people blog on social networks as compared to traditional blog websites. So perhaps the rapid growth is due to the rise of social networks?

Ah, well the data shows that the majority of bloggers are women, half of whom are moms. Another 20% of bloggers are fathers. Something about parenting drives a person to blog…

More stats at neilsenwire

A real Moneyball story – the reinvention of pitcher Brandon McCarthy

SEVEN PITCHES. That’s how long it took for the verdict to come in. On April 5, in the first inning of his first start in an A’s uniform, Brandon McCarthy went groundout, groundout, groundout. It was a one-inning sabermetric masterpiece. For the game, he lasted eight innings — the second-longest start of his career — and threw just 89 pitches.

McCarthy’s filthy stuff was no laughing matter. “He’s not trying to strike you out,” says Hunter, who had long dominated the lanky pitcher — until last season. “He’s trying to get a ground ball. He’s keeping guys off balance, and he’s hitting his spots. He’s learned how to pitch.” (“The first time I got him out last year,” says McCarthy, “I was like, ‘Oh my god, I really did something!’ That just wasn’t possible before.”) A’s manager Bob Melvin says McCarthy’s new pitching approach reminds him of Greg Maddux, the 300-game winner and surefire Hall of Famer. Says Melvin: “He takes great pride in being able to throw the ball where he wants.” And when he wants.

He learned about FIP, or fielding independent pitching, a statistical aggregate that combines what a pitcher can control (homers, walks, strikeouts), ignores what he can’t (luck, defense) and is a truer barometer than ERA. He also learned about BABIP, or batting average on balls in play, a stat that indicates whether a pitcher has been especially lucky (under .300) or unlucky (over .300). He learned about WAR, or wins above replacement, the all-inclusive, apples-to-apples metric that tells how valuable a player is to his team. He learned about ground ball rates, strikeout-to-walk ratios and more.

via Saviormetrics – ESPN The Magazine

Facts and statistics on the coming plastic bag ban in California

Plastic bags contribute to the pollution of California’s ocean and beaches.

  • Californians use approximately 16 billion plastic bags per year – more than 400 annually per person.
  • Less than 5 percent of plastic bags are recycled. Instead, they end up sitting in landfills, littering streets, clogging streams, fouling beaches, or floating out to sea.
  • Plastic trash threatens ocean ecosystems.
  • The city of San Francisco estimated that the taxpayer cost to subsidize the recycling, collection, and disposal of plastic and paper bags amounts to as much as 17 cents per bag. Applied to California as a whole, that adds up to more than $1 billion per year.

 

More than 80 national and local governments around the world have taken action to protect the ocean by reducing the use of plastic bags.

  • At least 20 nations and 47 local governments have passed bans on distributing specific kinds of throw-away plastic bags, including the nations of Italy, Kenya, Mongolia, Macedonia, and Bangladesh; the states of Maharashtra, India and Buenos Aires, Argentina; and the cities of Karachi, Pakistan and Telluride, Colorado.
  • Approximately 26 nations and local communities have established fee programs to reduce plastic bag use and/or increase the use of reusable alternatives, including Botswana, China, Hong Kong, Wales, Ireland, Israel, Canada’s Northwest Territories, Toronto, Mexico City, and Washington, D.C.

 

Bans and meaningful fee programs effectively reduce plastic bag pollution.

  • Bans and fee programs quickly reduce plastic bag distribution.
    • Fee – In 2002, Ireland established a 28 U.S. cents per bag fee, and saw plastic bag use drop by 90 percent within the first year.
    • Fee – Washington, D.C., implemented a much smaller 5 cent tax on plastic bags, the number of bags distributed by food retailers fell from 22.5 million per month to 3.3 million per month.
    • Ban – San Francisco, the year after banning plastic bags at pharmacies and supermarkets in 2007, businesses distributed 127 million fewer plastic bags, and cut overall bag waste reaching the city landfill by up to 10 percent.

 

Fourteen city and county governments in California have taken successful action to reduce plastic bag pollution.

  • Fourteen California cities and counties have bans on plastic bags in effect, including Long Beach, Santa Monica, San Jose, San Francisco, and Pasadena.
  • Five of these communities, including Marin County and San Jose, have also authorized mandatory charges on paper bags to encourage citizens to use reusable bags.

 

Much more progress can be made to reduce plastic pollution in the ocean and transform our throw-away culture.

  • Education and recycling cannot keep pace with the generation of plastic bag pollution. Despite a 2006 law requiring retailers to place bag recycling bins in front of their stores, less than 5 percent of bags are recycled.
  • To make a real impact, all California cities and counties should restrict the use of plastic bags, and advocate for similar action at the state level.

 

From the Frontier Group.

The long-term unemployed make up half of those unemployed

4 important facts about unemployment from economist Lee Ohanian:

  • The economy should be creating 500,000 jobs/month, instead of 200,000.
  • Long-term unemployed makes up half of those unemployed, and they have little or no value in our economy.
  • The retirement age is certainly going to rise.
  • Those with only a high school degree or less are not competitive in the global economy.

 

More than 200,000 new jobs were created in January, 2012. What do you make of the pace of job growth?

The major puzzle about the U.S. economy has been the remarkably slow job growth. The U.S. economy should be creating about 500,000 jobs per month now, given high worker productivity, the large pool of available workers and the fairly high level of corporate profits. While 200,000 jobs sounds really positive, it is only about half of what we should be seeing.

The long-term unemployed — those who have been out of work for more than six months. It seems that new jobs are going to people who have just entered the workforce or to those who were unemployed for a short time. What’s going on here?

Long-term unemployment is at a record level of nearly 50 percent of the unemployed. The market value of these workers is very low, because many simply don’t have the specific skills required to compete in today’s economy. It becomes the problem of retraining construction workers to become health care workers. It can’t be done overnight, but this process needs to move forward. Those construction jobs aren’t coming back anytime soon. Reforming unemployment insurance to include retraining funding would be useful.

What is your view on the retirement age in the U.S.? Is it too low, too high or just right?

The retirement age is now, depending on what year you were born, between 65 and 67 for full benefits. This will almost certainly rise in response to dealing with the upcoming shortfall in Social Security associated with baby boomers [more than 70 million of them ] who are now approaching retirement. The aging of the baby boom cohort will increase the share of the population who is 65 and older from its current level of 13 percent to about 19 percent of the population. This will put enormous pressure on the underfunded Social Security system — so get ready for a gradual increase in the full retirement age.

How has unemployment differentially impacted workers?

Education level is a major differentiator. Workers with high levels of education and training — those with bachelor’s degrees and beyond — have very low unemployment rates, about 4 percent. In contrast, those with no post-high-school education and very young workers have unemployment rates of more than 20 percent. The message is very clear: A good career starts with a solid education that includes training beyond high school.

Low-skilled and unskilled workers were hit very hard by the recession and continue to suffer. Is anything going to change for them?

This again points to education. Many of these unemployed have only a high school degree or never graduated from high school. These workers are, for the most part, no longer competitive in the global economy. Many may not be competitive even at current minimum wages, and some probably wouldn’t work for minimum wages. Fundamentally, they need to retrain in order to successfully re-engage in the labor market.

How many hours of TV, internet video, TiVo, and mobile video do Americans watch?

  • Average entertainment consumption on TV – 32 hours, 47 minutes
  • ” on the internet – 4 hours
  • ” on TiVo – 2 hours, 21 minutes
  • Average video consumption on internet – 27 minutes
  • Average video consumption on a mobile device – 7 minutes

 

What age range are you in?

 

Did you notice that kids watch more TV than teenagers and young adults…

 

 

// Nielsen data unique based on the Total Population in the U.S. – all 297 million Americans over age 2 – whether or not they have the technology (Q2 2011)

Fun facts of the Oscars…nineteen nominations for playing the king/queen of England?

19 Nominations for actors playing kings and queens of England

 

$325,000 - Cost of It Happened One Night (Best Picture, 1935)

 

$237 million - Cost of Avatar (Best Picture nomination, 2010—it lost)

 

23 - Best Picture nominees in which Bess Flowers appeared, the most of any actor (and she was an extra in all 23 films)

 

5 minutes - Length of shortest Oscar ceremony (1929)

 

4 hours 23 minutes - Length of longest Oscar ceremony (2002)

 

16 Best Picture winners set in New York

  1. The Broadway Melody
  2. The Great Ziegfeld
  3. You Can’t Take It With You
  4. Going My Way
  5. The Lost Weekend
  6. Gentleman’s Agreement
  7. All About Eve
  8. Marty
  9. The Apartment
  10. West Side Story
  11. Midnight Cowboy
  12. The French Connection
  13. The Godfather
  14. The Godfather, Part II
  15. Annie Hall
  16. Kramer vs. Kramer

 

2 Best Picture winners set in Los Angeles

  1. Million Dollar Baby
  2. Crash

 

And, twenty-two more quirky facts at – Oscar by the Numbers