Tag Archives: fun

Adventure playground is open! – mud slide, rafting, fort building, rope bridge

The kids will get dirty.

At this Central Park adventure, kids will hammer, saw wood, make forts, push themselves around in the shallow water on a raft and do all sorts of climbing, jumping and whatever they choose. Kids can raft on a small pond, navigate a rope bridge, use a cable slide, go down a mud slide and more. Bring a spare change of clothing, a plastic bag to put the wet clothes in and close-toed shoes for safety.

Parents will not be allowed to tell the kids, “Don’t get dirty.” Sorry mom or dad. The dirt is what this is about and you must just butt out!

This summer-fun event is held annually. Adventure Playground runs mid-June through mid-August. This experience is suitable for kids six to twelve years old. It is only open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Monday through Saturday, closed Sunday. Adult supervision is provided and a small fee is charged. For information and group reservations, phone (714) 842-7442.

Location: Huntington Central Park, 7111 Talbert Avenue , Huntington Beach, California.

 

A google user: “I loved going here when I was younger. Tons of fun!! The rafts and the mudslide were cool and the tree house building area was my favorite! I recommend it.”

 

Source: Beach California, City of Huntington Beach

 

 

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Netflix meets its heaviest user – 252 movies in one month

Mark Malkoff just can’t help himself. The new York-based comedian is one of those people who find challenges in everything. So when a company like Netflix offers unlimited streaming for $8 a month, someone like Malkoff starts to wonder about his own limits. Earlier this year, Malkoff embarked on his Netflix challenge in an attempt to figure out how much value he could get out of his $8 subscription within a single month. 30 days later, Malkoff had watched 252 movies, beginning to end, including the credits.

**that’s 8.4 movies/day**

Excessive use like this might have triggered automatic service suspension at other companies, but quickly Netflix realized the promotional potential of his challenge, and started tweeting about it. This week, the company even invited him to their headquarters where dozens of employees celebrated him as the most obsessive user the company ever had.

This isn’t the first time Malkoff has taken on an endurance challenge like this. A few years back, he successfully visited each and every of Starbucks’ 171 stores in Manhattan within 24 hours, consuming something at every store. Malkoff has also lived in an Ikea store for a week, and spent 30 days flying on an AirTran jet.

Read the full storyThe day Netflix met its heaviest user

 

Mark’s Netflix Challenge:

Music Video: Days by The Drums (at the Handplane Hoedown)

On Saturday, May 5th, 2012, a gathering of fine individuals came together to play in the sun and shorebreak. A plethora of handplanes littered the beach and everyone was smiling and having fun. The video is a short view into what went down and some of the reasons why bodysurfing is so stoke heavy.

Why are lifelong surfers trading in their boards for swim fins?

Why are all these lifelong surfers trading in their boards for swim fins? Board builder and alternative surf craft artisan Jon Wegener had this to say:

“As surfing becomes more complicated, futuristic and radical, there’s a backlash of people who just want to go and have fun. You want to find something simple, and it’s just easy to go and have fun with a handplane. We don’t have Pipeline and waves like that. We have mediocre beachbreaks, and this stuff is really fun in waves like that. You don’t need a lot … you get your best tube view on a head high wave when you’re bodysurfing, so it gives you some exhilaration in our waves.”

Ed Lewis of Enjoy Handplanes added, “We all grew up going to the beach, jumping in the water and playing around. For me, getting back into bodysurfing brings me back to being a kid, and you just kind of need that.”

keep readingShawn Parkin’s full article on ESPN.com

 

Handplanes - used for bodysurfing - made by a growing number of companies

 

// Photo by Shawn Parkin

Talk is cheap…so make a Long Bet (for charity) to prove your prediction

Pronouncements about the future come easy. Even when made with an air of authority, they’re usually just cheap talk, rarely revisited. Only the tiny fraction that have proven correct tend to be remembered, when their authors want to take credit.

But what if there were some cash at stake?

The Long Bets Foundation, a new project masterminded by Well founder Stewart Brand and Wired editor-at-large Kevin Kelly, hopes to raise the quality of our collective foresight by incorporating money and accountability into the process of debate.

The idea is simple. If someone makes a grandiose claim, any skeptic can challenge it – “Would you bet on that?” – and the Long Bets Foundation will keep tabs on the wager, whether it takes five years or five decades to come to pass. If proven right, a predictor can relish the victory; if wrong, the challenger gets the glory.

 

 

The Bets:

- Over a ten-year period, the S & P 500 will outperform hedge funds, when performance is measured on a basis net of fees, costs and expenses. – $1,000,000 – (Warren Buffet vs. Protege Partners, LLC)

 

- At least one human alive in the year 2000 will still be alive in 2150. – $2,000 (Peter Schwartz vs. Melody Haller)

 

- Large Hadron Collider will destroy Earth. – $1,000 (Joe Keane vs. Nick Damiano)

 

- By 2020, a professional sports team (NFL, NBA, MLB, NHL, MLS) will integrate and have a woman as a team member/player. – $500 (Thomas Leavens vs. Martin Nisenholtz)

 

- By 2025, the states will have voted on at least one constitutional amendment to cede US federal power to a global government. – $800 (Thomas Quigley vs. Steven Midgley)

 

See more on the record bets.

 

By preserving the terms of the wager in public view, Long Bets promises to be more than a service for confident prognosticators. Over time, it hopes to foster better understanding of how predictions in aggregate work out in reality – what kinds of truths are easiest (or hardest) to forecast, and what kinds of people are right (or wrong) most reliably.

According to the Long Bets Foundation, all stakes are treated as charitable donations, tax deductible when the bet is made. Bettors designate nonprofits to receive the proceeds. Meanwhile, the foundation holds the funds in an investment account for the life of the bet, with half of the growth covering administrative costs. A competition designed to thrive in the public eye, Long Bets uses time as a teacher.

via Wired, May 2002

Capture a “moment-in-time” with new Microsoft project, Cliplet

Cliplet – a type of image that sits between a still image and video. It allows you to capture a moment-in-time instead of an instant.

 

Microsoft Research is showing a new project called “Cliplets” that lets users turn video clips into something closer to a moving still image by effectively freezing a portion of the frame and leaving another portion of the video to run as is.

The project was unveiled this week as part of Microsoft Research TechFest, an internal science fair, and it’s available for public download now for Windows 7.

via GeekWire

 

// Thx to Noble Ackerson

Poking fun at Google CEO, Larry Page – just how often does he say “excited”?

You know that favorite word you like to say 16 times in conversation?

A humorous post from Liz Gannes at All Things D, found the Google CEO’s favorite word.

Larry Page is so excited. And he just can’t hide it…Page does like to talk about how excited he is.

Having noticed the Google CEO’s fondness for using variations of “exciting” and “excited” when discussing his company’s products and businesses, we at AllThingsD had a bit of fun with the transcripts from his recent earnings calls.

Since Page reassumed the CEO role last year, he hit an all-time high of 16 mentions of “excited” on last year’s third-quarter call. His company’s performance made him both “incredibly excited” and “amazingly excited.”

This quarter, Page was a bit more muted: only eight mentions.

Not that we’re claiming to be scientific — at all — but Page does seem to be more effusive when Google beats analysts’ estimates for Google’s earnings per share.

 

The full list of exciting-isms: