Tag Archives: olympics

Celebrating 40 years of Title IX with 40 amazing female athletes

Celebrating 40 years of Title IX

It simply reads:

No person in the United States shall, on the basis of sex, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any education program or activity receiving Federal financial assistance.”

When it became law on June 23, 1972, Title IX changed the landscape of collegiate athletics.

Its impact over the last 40 years has been profound from coast-to-coast.

 

Such a great piece of legislation!

The perfect time to celebrate this landmark act after the woman of America so dominated the London 2012 Olympic Games.

My alma mater, UCLA, is writing about the 40 greatest women athletes since Title IX, and the list is quite impressive.

Among the athletes are Florence Griffith-Joyner (Flo-Jo), who according to Wikipedia is “considered the “fastest woman of all time” based on the fact that she still holds the world record for both the 100 metres and 200 metres, both set in 1988 and never seriously challenged.”

Jackie Joyner-Kersee (JJK), from Wikipedia, “ranked among the all-time greatest athletes in the women’s heptathlon as well as in the women’s long jump. Sports Illustrated for Women magazine voted Joyner-Kersee the Greatest Female Athlete of the 20th century.”

And, 40 more!

 

Continue reading

Don’t forget about the Paralympics – they’re on from Aug 31 – Sep 9

(photo: London 2012 Paralympics)

 

I really enjoyed the Olympics, particularly seeing Oscar Pistorius compete in his carbon fibre Cheetah foot. Now, I’m looking forward to seeing some of the more exciting Paralympic events:

Following his historic appearance at the Olympic Games – where he was the first male athlete with a disability to compete at the able-bodied Games – South African Pistorius will be keen to assert his dominance on the Paralympic stage once more.

He will be participating in his third Paralympic Games and will hope to repeat his success at Beijing 2008, where he won gold medals in the 100m, 200m and 400m events in the T44 category. – London 2012 Paralympics

 

I also want to see the wheelchair racing in the track & field athletics division. There is also a record number of women competing and so I will look forward to seeing some of those events.

The good news is that for the first time NBC will be broadcasting the Paralympics and the International Paralympic Committee will host 580 hours of online coverage.

 

Continue reading

To build the artificial river for the Olympics, designers used large lego-like blocks

Did you have a chance to see the white water sports at the Olympics, like kayaking and canoeing?

If so, you probably noticed that the entire venue was artificial. The Lee Valley White Water Centre in the north of London was created out of a vast expanse of flat land. The designers, including a firm from Colorado, S20, had to build it all from scratch, including the high-powered water pumps and the speedy, treacherous river.

It made for a fantastic set of competitions and, it turns out, a lasting site for Londoners. The venue is going to stay open for both recreational activities and as a training site for future Olympians.

And, the Smithsonian blog wrote about an intriguing innovation used in the building of the rapids. They used what looks like Lego blocks to create the river bottom:

Since the earliest whitewater slalom competitions in the 1930s, most artificial courses have been constructed primarily of concrete, with static forms inserted to mimic boulders, logs…S20′s design turns the static features into adjustable plastic modules—a bit like underwater Legos—which can be positioned with a high degree of precision, and moved at no cost, essentially creating a new stretch of river each time.

 

Continue reading

NBC hits ratings gold, best ever – despite extensive online features, streaming events

NBC’s London Olympics ratings defy expectations

NBC’s ratings are on track to outdistance numbers from the 2008 Beijing Olympics, which many TV industry executives had figured would be a high-water mark. The last Summer Olympics to consistently attract such large crowds were the Montreal Games in 1976 — long before cable TV networks began splintering the audience.

Wow, NBC had 32 million people watching every night!

 

 

Continue reading

Is there prize money given with olympic medals?

There’s no pay from the IOC (International Olympic Committee) when they win a medal. But many countries Olympic committees pay their athletes for winning medals. Among them, The U.S., Russia, Canada, China & Italy and many more countries.

$20K-$50K per gold medal is typical in bigger countries. The smaller countries actually tend to pay more, $50K-$100K, since a single gold is more important to their country. Some athletes receive cars, houses and promise of jobs when they retire.

 

Source: Yahoo! Answers

 

In the U.S., our athletes receive, from the U.S. Olympic Committee, $25,000 for gold, $15,000 for silver, and $10,000 for bronze.

Swimmers, receive even more thanks to an organization called USA Swimming, who chips in an additional $75,000 for gold, as has been highly publicized for Missy Franklin.

 

 

Continue reading

Tug of War, once a part of Ancient Olympics, was also once a part of the modern Olympics

Tug of war was contested as a team event in the Summer Olympics at every Olympiad from 1900 to 1920. Originally the competition was entered by clubs, which meant that one country could win several medals. This happened in 1904, when the United States won all three medals, and in 1908 when the podium was occupied by three British teams. Sweden was also among the top countries with two medals, one as a member of the mixed team.

During its time as an Olympic sport, it was considered to be part of the Olympic athletics programme, although the sports of tug of war and athletics are now considered distinct. – Wikipedia

 

Tug of war was also a part of the ancient Olympic games…

 

Just how serious do people take Tug of War? Here are a few things we learned from checking out the website for the Tug Of War International Federation:

• There’s a manual to build your own tug of war boots.

• The rule book for the 2009-2010 seasonis 84 pages long.

• They follow WADA’s drug guidelines, making this sport far stricter than any of the major sports played in the United States.

• Finally, you can get caught up on all of this by watching a nice video:

 

 

Source: ESPN – Bring back the tug of war

 

 

Continue reading

Photos of the skydiver who parachuted into the Olympics dressed as the Queen

(Yahoo! Sports)

 

God save the queen. And get her a razor for her five o’clock shadow.

The stuntperson who was featured during that showstopping moment in Friday night’s Opening Ceremony when Queen Elizabeth jumped out of a helicopter with James Bond was a better actor than you ever knew. A closer look reveals it was a man dressed as the queen and pulling the cord on the parachute.

Gary Connery, above right, is a 42-year-old stuntperson who has appeared in British television shows and popular movies including the “Indiana Jones” series. He’s a jumping daredevil, having set the record for highest free jump and making close to 1,000 skydives in his career.

Connery was tasked with playing the queen during the ceremony, a role which included jumping out of the helicopter and landing precisely on a nearby bridge and, perhaps more dangerously, wearing a tiara and pearls.

 

Learn more: Times Union - The stuntman, emphasis on man, who dressed like Queen Elizabeth and jumped out of a helicopter

 

 

Continue reading

The most amazing, moving commercial of the Olympics – Meet the Superhumans of the Paralympics

 

This multi-sport training montage reveals that the Paralympics aren’t just a wheelchair affair. As Public Enemy’s “Harder Than You Think” blares in the background, we see Great Britain’s best: the visually impaired soccer team practicing with blindfolds (a way to ensure that those who see more than others don’t gain an unfair advantage), the fierce-looking four-foot tall champion swimmer Ellie Simmonds, amputee runners, and, yes, the wheelchair basketball team.*

Halfway through the clip, there’s a jarring cut to a bomb exploding in a war zone. Then there’s a pregnant mother at the hospital, awaiting word of her unborn child’s condition. That’s followed by a road accident that sends a car flipping on the highway. A second later, we’re back in the gym, where a legless man is doing pull-ups. Then we see a man—presumably the victim of that horrific car wreck—next to his crumpled vehicle.

 

Keep reading: Slate - This Trailer for the Paralympic Games is the Most Amazing Olympic Video You’ll Ever See

The complete TV schedule for the 2012 London Olympics

Here are the big events for Fri/Sat, with the full schedule available from the L.A. Times – 2012 London Olympics on TV

 

Friday

2012 Summer Olympics 7:30 p.m. Friday, NBC: Opening Ceremony: London, the first city to host the Olympics three times, welcomes the world and Queen Elizabeth II officially opens the Games. (N)

 

Saturday

2012 Summer Olympics 6 a.m. Saturday, NBCSP: Soccer, Beach Volleyball, Volleyball, Equestrian, Shooting, Archery, Handball, Table Tennis: From London. Soccer, women’s: USA vs. Colombia, Brazil vs. New Zealand, France vs. DPR Korea; beach volleyball; volleyball, women’s: China vs. Serbia; equestrian: eventing dressage; shooting: women’s 10m air rifle; archery; handball; table tennis. (N)

2012 Summer Olympics 9 a.m. Saturday, NBC: Swimming, Cycling, Beach Volleyball, Volleyball, Basketball, Rowing: From London. Swimming: qualifying heats; cycling: men’s road race; beach volleyball, men’s: USA vs. South Africa; volleyball, women’s: USA vs. Republic of Korea; basketball, women’s: USA vs. Croatia; rowing: qualifying heats. (N)

2012 Summer Olympics 8 p.m. Saturday, NBC: Swimming, Gymnastics, Beach Volleyball: From London. Swimming, finals: men’s and women’s 400m individual medley, men’s 400m freestyle, women’s 4x100m freestyle relay; gymnastics: men’s team competition; beach volleyball, women’s: USA vs. Australia. (N)

 

And, if you’re away from the TV you can watch every event on the web, or on your smartphone, plus like your favorite athletes on Facebook.

 

Continue reading

London Olympics may be the greenest, most sustainable ever

With the opening ceremony of the London Olympics only days away, organizers prepare to celebrate what may be the one of the greenest Olympic Games to date.

For Olympic organizers, sustainability has been a major focus in planning the Games’ venues. Forbes notes that existing or temporary venues are utilized whenever possible. For permanent structures, “Each new venue was required to achieve a minimum 15 percent improvement against Building Regulations.”

The site of London’s Olympic Park has also been noted for its radical transformation. Once an industrial area along the River Lea, the site was previously contaminated by “heavy metals, hydrocarbons, arsenic and cyanide,” according to BBC News.

At the largest urban park built in Britain in over the century, officials planted 2,000 native trees and 300,00 wetland plants and restored five miles of the River Lea. 110 acres of land were also turned into “reed beds, wet woodlands, grassland and ponds” to encourage the return of wildlife, reported the Press Association.

While British officials originally planned to draw 20 percent of the London Olympics’ power from renewable sources, they fell short of that goal. The BioRegional and WWF-UK report explains that only nine percent of on-site energy will be renewable.

 

Source: Huffington Post Green - London Olympics: Green Games A Goal For Organizers

 

 

Continue reading