Tag Archives: modern

Tug of War, once a part of Ancient Olympics, was also once a part of the modern Olympics

Tug of war was contested as a team event in the Summer Olympics at every Olympiad from 1900 to 1920. Originally the competition was entered by clubs, which meant that one country could win several medals. This happened in 1904, when the United States won all three medals, and in 1908 when the podium was occupied by three British teams. Sweden was also among the top countries with two medals, one as a member of the mixed team.

During its time as an Olympic sport, it was considered to be part of the Olympic athletics programme, although the sports of tug of war and athletics are now considered distinct. – Wikipedia

 

Tug of war was also a part of the ancient Olympic games…

 

Just how serious do people take Tug of War? Here are a few things we learned from checking out the website for the Tug Of War International Federation:

• There’s a manual to build your own tug of war boots.

• The rule book for the 2009-2010 seasonis 84 pages long.

• They follow WADA’s drug guidelines, making this sport far stricter than any of the major sports played in the United States.

• Finally, you can get caught up on all of this by watching a nice video:

 

 

Source: ESPN – Bring back the tug of war

 

 

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The hilarious South Korean hip hop video, Gangnam Style – best music video of the year?

 

Park Jae Sang, better known in his homeland as PSY, is a South Korean hip hop artist who is “popular underground due to his sense of humor and unique concerts,” according to Wikipedia.

The Berklee College of Music graduate recently released “Gangnam Style” — his first single in two years — and the music video that accompanies it is a thing to behold.

One Redditor-in-the-know offered this illuminating commentary on what it all means:

From what I understand, Gangnam is the fancy schmancy rich part of Seoul. The video is making light of him singing about what a classy dude he is while screaming at yoga butts and dancing in garages and junk.

 

Source: Gawker - Did This Underground Hip Hop Artist from South Korea Just Release the Best Music Video of the Year?

A century of Olympic posters

‘The Start of the Sprinters’ Dash’. Yusaku Kamekura (art director); Osamu Hayasaki (photographer)

 

 

Images from the book “A Century of Olympic Posters” by Margaret Timmers:

As snapshots through time, Olympic posters provide a fascinating record of our world, a lens through which we can explore links between sports and art, politics and place, commerce and culture. A Century of Olympic Posters offers an intensely visual representation of the modern Games, and shows the evolution of the Olympic Games poster as well, from the first official poster for Stockholm in 1912 right up to the present.

 

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The ousted authoritarian government of Mexico – PRI – may be back

When Mexico’s long-ruling party was ousted by voters 12 years ago, giddy celebrants hailed the event as something like the fall of the Berlin Wall.

For seven decades, the Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI, had governed virtually unchallenged, aided by election trickery, a well-honed ability to buy off potential troublemakers and, when that didn’t work, an iron fist. Its historic loss in 2000, and its tumble to third place six years later, led some to even imagine a Mexico without the PRI.

Now the PRI is on the verge of an epic comeback. Polls show the party’s presidential candidate, Enrique Peña Nieto, holding a double-digit lead over three rivals ahead of the July 1 vote. The party could also end up with majorities in both houses of Congress for the first time in 15 years.

The PRI’s march back from humiliation owes as much to widespread anger over skyrocketing drug violence and an anemic job market as to any lessons learned.

But the possibility of a PRI triumph raises a question now at the heart of the race: What kind of PRI would govern — a cleaned-up, “new PRI” retooled for a modernizing Mexico, or the opaque monolith of yore, with its dark intrigues, rampant graft and authoritarian streak?

 

Keep readingThe fall and rise of Mexico’s PRI

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Big Wednesdays – a summer surf movie series – with 5 films

The California Surf Museum and California Surf Festival are bringing together a 5-piece film festival, spread out over the summer. Every few Wednesdays they will show a modern or classic surf film.

Tickets are $10, shows start at 7pm, and located in Oceanside, California.

See the poster at bottom for the full details.

 

June 20 - BoardRoom: Legends of Surfboard Shaping

BoardRoom is a feature-length documentary featuring the legends of early surfboard shaping.

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Google brings 130 World Wonders online – explore with photos, videos, and street view

The Google World Wonders Project is a platform which brings world heritage sites of the modern and ancient world online.

Journey to more than 130 world heritage sites across the globe—like Stonehenge, the Palace and Garden of Versailles, temples of ancient Kyoto or The White City of Tel-Aviv.

With videos, photos and in-depth information, you can now explore the world wonders from your armchair just as if you were there. Advancements in our camera technologies allow us to go off the beaten track to photograph some of the most significant places in the world so that anyone, anywhere can explore them.

The World Wonders Project also presents a valuable resource for students and scholars who can now virtually discover some of the most famous sites on earth. The project offers an innovative way to teach history and geography to students all over the world.

Together with partners including UNESCO, the World Monuments Fund and Cyark, the World Wonders Project is preserving the world heritage sites for future generations.

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Start exploring the World Wonders Project and share your favorite places you’ve visited using the hashtag #worldwonders

 

via World Wonders Project

 

Screenshot of the site:

 

 

And, clicking on the Wonder – Three Castles in Bellinzona, Switzerland:

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Covered in brilliant spots – The Obliteration Room

Yayoi Kusama’s interactive Obliteration Room begins as an entirely white space, furnished as a monochrome living room, which people are then invited to ‘obliterate’ with multi-coloured stickers.

After a few weeks the room is transformed from a blank canvas into an explosion of colour, with thousands of spots stuck over every available surface.

TateShots have produced this timelapse video of the first few weeks of its presentation at Tate Modern. It was conceived as a project for children, and was first staged at the Queensland Art Gallery in 2002. The Obliteration Room at Tate Modern is free, and is open to the public until 18 March 2012.

 

Thx to Guy Kawasaki