Tag Archives: prize

Discover Britain’s best (and weirdest) artist – the Turner Prize 2012

Every year the Tate Gallery in London awards the Turner Prize to Britain’s weirdest artist. The award is £25,000 and there are four finalists exhibiting their work:

  • Paul Noble – drawings of his invented city “Nobson Newtown” and scatological sculptures (poo statutes).
  • Spartacus Chetwynd – medieval morality plays with characters dressed like trees.
  • Luke Fowler – a film covering the life and work of maverick Scottish psychiatrist RD Laing (1927-89), and photographs of people in everyday poses.
  • Elizabeth Price – a film in three parts, The Woolworths Choir of 1979, about a fire in 1979 that killed 10 people set to the music of girl pop bands.

The winner is selected on December 3, 2012.

Photos of their work and a video of the exhibitions with Adrian Searle.

 

Intricate drawing of Nobson Newtown by Paul Noble. (source: Jonathan Hordle/Rex Features)

 

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Is there prize money given with olympic medals?

There’s no pay from the IOC (International Olympic Committee) when they win a medal. But many countries Olympic committees pay their athletes for winning medals. Among them, The U.S., Russia, Canada, China & Italy and many more countries.

$20K-$50K per gold medal is typical in bigger countries. The smaller countries actually tend to pay more, $50K-$100K, since a single gold is more important to their country. Some athletes receive cars, houses and promise of jobs when they retire.

 

Source: Yahoo! Answers

 

In the U.S., our athletes receive, from the U.S. Olympic Committee, $25,000 for gold, $15,000 for silver, and $10,000 for bronze.

Swimmers, receive even more thanks to an organization called USA Swimming, who chips in an additional $75,000 for gold, as has been highly publicized for Missy Franklin.

 

 

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Netflix drops $1 million algorithm, goes all-in on streaming recommendations

 

Netflix awarded a $1 million prize to a developer team in 2009 for an algorithm that increased the accuracy of the company’s recommendation engine by 10 percent. But today it doesn’t use the million-dollar code, and has no plans to implement it in the future, Netflix announced on its blog Friday.

The post goes on to explain why: a combination of too much engineering effort for the results, and a shift from movie recommendations to the “next level” of personalization caused by the transition of the business from mailed DVDs to video streaming.

Netflix notes that it does still use two algorithms from the team that won the first Progress Prize for an 8.43 percent improvement.

via ars technica

It turns out that all the prize-winning work was perfect for DVD-by-mail where users add something to their queue and, best-case scenario, receive it the following day. But, now that instant streaming is taking over the parameters have changed. Viewers want something to watch immediately and like the option of flipping between several options.

That is why the Netflix updated all of its interfaces to show rows of movies giving you many, many options. It’s a subtle shift from finding the one movie you will love two days from now, to showing all the possible movies you might want to watch right now.

I guess that is the simplest way to put it, but if you want to know more the Netflix personalization science and engineering team, Xavier Amatriain and Justin Basilico, posted a lengthy and detailed, but interesting write-up, Beyond the 5 stars.

Images of Albert Einstein’s 1921 Nobel Prize medal and certificate

In 1922, the Royal Swedish Academy awarded Albert Einstein the 1921 Nobel Prize in Physics. The official announcement came when Einstein was on a lecture tour in Japan. Einstein’s General Theory of Relativity was, at that time, still controversial and members of the Swedish Academy avoided the issue by granting him the prize for his groundbreaking contribution to the understanding of the Photoelectric Effect. Some of them did support General Relativity, but a mere eclipse was not enough proof for all committee members to risk their reputations on Einstein’s new theory.

via The Einstein Archives – His Personal Life

 

Much more available in the Einstein Archives.