Tag Archives: college

Zero waste college football – Ohio State’s 105,000 seat stadium goes zero waste

Ohio Stadium is the largest stadium in the country to attempt zero waste. With 105,000 seats and a massive tailgating section this is a challenge. Their goal is get near-zero waste with 90% of the trash turned into recycling and compost.

The success has been fast and big with a 61% reduction in trash sent to landfills in 2011, the first year of the program. And an incredibly high season average of 75.3% for recycling and compost for an average of 105,231 people.

The best part is how fast this is all moving. When the program began they weren’t sure what they could do, and labelled zero waste as “pretty impossible”. Now, they are hoping for at least one game in the 2012 season with 90% diversion rate, their standard for zero waste.

An incredible achievement that shows zero waste is possible, can happen fast, and without interrupting all the fun.

Learn more:

 

Zero Waste at Ohio Stadium

 

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How much will it cost your cable company to get the PAC-12 Network?

How much are you worth to your college football team? For PAC-12 fans that may be just under a dollar, from the L.A. Times:

SportsBusiness Journal reported that the Pac-12 is seeking more than 80 cents per subscriber to carry its channels. That’s more than CNN, USA and FX and about the same as Disney Channel, according to SNL Kagan, an industry consulting firm. Another person close to the negotiations — but not authorized to speak publicly — said the asking price is significantly lower.

Does this mean our cable bills are going to go up by a dollar? And it’s probably too much to ask for only the PAC-12 network. Offer it online, charge $0.80/month, I will sign-up! Heck, double or quadruple the charge and I’m still in. Wouldn’t that be great…   Continue reading

Celebrating 40 years of Title IX with 40 amazing female athletes

Celebrating 40 years of Title IX

It simply reads:

No person in the United States shall, on the basis of sex, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any education program or activity receiving Federal financial assistance.”

When it became law on June 23, 1972, Title IX changed the landscape of collegiate athletics.

Its impact over the last 40 years has been profound from coast-to-coast.

 

Such a great piece of legislation!

The perfect time to celebrate this landmark act after the woman of America so dominated the London 2012 Olympic Games.

My alma mater, UCLA, is writing about the 40 greatest women athletes since Title IX, and the list is quite impressive.

Among the athletes are Florence Griffith-Joyner (Flo-Jo), who according to Wikipedia is “considered the “fastest woman of all time” based on the fact that she still holds the world record for both the 100 metres and 200 metres, both set in 1988 and never seriously challenged.”

Jackie Joyner-Kersee (JJK), from Wikipedia, “ranked among the all-time greatest athletes in the women’s heptathlon as well as in the women’s long jump. Sports Illustrated for Women magazine voted Joyner-Kersee the Greatest Female Athlete of the 20th century.”

And, 40 more!

 

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Financial aid per student has grown 37% (or $5,000) over the past decade

An interesting graphic from NPR’s Planet Money series on the cost of college. That’s a 37% increase in financial aid per student since the 2000-2001 school year. The increase is largely paid for by more federal loans, with smaller contributions from federal grants and private loans. Everything else seems unchanged.

 

The recession hits Harvard…with interesting changes – more money to undergrads, less to books

Harvard isn’t belt-tightening everywhere. Since 2007, its investment in financial aid to undergraduates has risen by more than 78%, which Harvard said is “significantly outpacing increases in tuition.” Undergraduate tuition for the 2012-13 year climbed 3.5% to $54,496.

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As it looks to economize, Harvard has turned some of its attention toward the more than $160 million it spends each year on its nearly 375 year-old library system, which holds 17 million volumes, and includes 73 separate libraries. Widener, the flagship library, alone has 57 miles of shelving.

Harvard is also changing its philosophy on owning books. The goal: Provide access to them rather than collecting each one, which can lead to costs for storage and preservation, a 2009 Harvard task-force report said. The library will extend partnerships to borrow from other libraries, and further digitize its own collection so it can share with others.

The university is finding it “increasingly painful” to manage academic-journal subscriptions, which annually cost it about $3.75 million, Harvard Provost Alan Garber said.

In a move watched throughout academia, Harvard in April urged its faculty members to publish in open-access journals. “Move the prestige to open access,” a memo said.

 

Keep reading: Wall Street Journal - Economy Tests Harvard

 

 

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New stadium rules for NFL games – free wifi, unlimited noise, more instant replay

Professional football, America’s most popular and profitable sport, is preparing to tackle a glaring weakness: Stadiums are increasingly empty.

As part of sweeping changes designed to give teams more flexibility to fill their seats, the National Football League is watering down its controversial TV “blackout” rule. And this season, for the first time, fans in the stadium will be able to watch the same instant replays the referees see during reviews of controversial calls.

The league also is planning to introduce wireless Internet in every stadium and to create smartphone apps that could let fans listen to players wearing microphones on the field.

With declines in ticket sales each of the past five years, average game attendance is down 4.5% since 2007, while broadcast and online viewership is soaring.

In hopes that professional football can mimic the wild stadium atmosphere typical of college football games, the NFL says it has “liberalized” its restraints on crowd noise. Stadiums will now be free to rile up crowds with video displays, and public-address announcers will no longer be restrained from inciting racket when the opposing offense faces a crucial third down.

 

Read moreGame Changer: NFL Scrambles to Fill Seats

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UCLA Football 2012 Schedule

Welcome back for another exciting season!

This year the Bruins face 5 away games and 7 home games.

The times for all the PAC-12 games are not yet set, nor are the television schedules. In general, the times will be set 12 days before the game.

UCLA Football 2012 Schedule

Thursday, Aug 30 - 4:30 p.m. PT
@ Rice
TV: CBS Sports Network

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America’s Best High Schools 2012

 

This year, our ranking highlights the best 1,000 public high schools in the nation—the ones that have proven to be the most effective in turning out college-ready grads.

The list is based on six components provided by school administrators:

  • Graduation rate (25 percent)
  • College matriculation rate (25 percent)
  • AP/IB/AICE tests taken per student (25 percent)
  • Average SAT/ACT scores (10 percent)
  • Average AP/IB/AICE scores (10 percent)
  • AP courses offered  per student(5 percent).

 

Search for your own school or find the best in your area:

America’s Best High Schools 2012

 

The top 10 schools:

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How a college campus in the middle of Los Angeles is lowering traffic

The rest of Los Angeles may seem as congested as ever, but traffic at UCLA is the lightest it’s ever been since the university began measuring more than 20 years ago.

The 2011 commuting report marks the eighth consecutive year that UCLA’s vehicle count dropped. With an average of 102,000 trips daily, the number of vehicle trips into and out of UCLA in 2011 was more than 3 percent lower than in 2010 and almost 20 percent lower than the campus’s peak in 2003.

“Vehicle counts are lower now than they were in 1990, when the cordon count first began,” according to UCLA Transportation’s newly released State of the Commute annual report.

UCLA Transportation offers incentives to encourage UCLA’s approximately 41,000 students and 26,000 employees to use alternative transportation, including a 50 percent subsidy for transit passes, discounted parking for carpoolers and a partially subsidized vanpool. The department also offers a variety of other benefits through the Bruin Commuter Club, which is open to all alternative-mode commuters, from bikers and walkers to bus-riders and carpoolers.

UCLA is approaching its goal of convincing half of its employees to switch to alternative transit, and only 52.9 percent currently drive to work alone, compared with nearly 72 percent of Los Angeles County drivers. Only 25 percent of students drive alone.

UCLA’s 50 percent goal is part of the campus’s Climate Action Plan.

via UCLA Newsroom

 

 

//Photo - UCLA on Facebook

Super athlete – box jumping – standing leap onto 62″ inch tall box

We’ve been awed all week at the history-making US Bobsled team. The bobsled and skeleton athletes from the USA have won medals so far in every event – including the first-ever gold medal in the men’s 2-man won by Steve Holcomb and Steve Langton.

Maybe you at home are sitting there thinking “Hey, that doesn’t look too bad, maybe I could make the team. I’d just have to push a little and enjoy the ride.” Well, before you start making room for your Olympic medals, check out this video of star brakeman ‘Super’ Steve Langton training on the box jump.

Langton is regarded by every athlete we’ve spoken to as nearly superman in his natural ability. Langton is a 6’2″, 230lbs sprinting machine. Like many bobsled athletes, he’s a former track athlete. He’s the champion in the inaugural Push Start World Championships. And he can leap onto a 62″ box from a standing start – that’s over 5 feet.

via Daily House

 

Then, there’s senior cornerback, Justin Bethel, from Presbyterian College, who at 6-feet jumps on these boxes at roughly 60 inches off the ground: