Tag Archives: title IX

Celebrating 40 years of Title IX with 40 amazing female athletes

Celebrating 40 years of Title IX

It simply reads:

No person in the United States shall, on the basis of sex, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any education program or activity receiving Federal financial assistance.”

When it became law on June 23, 1972, Title IX changed the landscape of collegiate athletics.

Its impact over the last 40 years has been profound from coast-to-coast.

 

Such a great piece of legislation!

The perfect time to celebrate this landmark act after the woman of America so dominated the London 2012 Olympic Games.

My alma mater, UCLA, is writing about the 40 greatest women athletes since Title IX, and the list is quite impressive.

Among the athletes are Florence Griffith-Joyner (Flo-Jo), who according to Wikipedia is “considered the “fastest woman of all time” based on the fact that she still holds the world record for both the 100 metres and 200 metres, both set in 1988 and never seriously challenged.”

Jackie Joyner-Kersee (JJK), from Wikipedia, “ranked among the all-time greatest athletes in the women’s heptathlon as well as in the women’s long jump. Sports Illustrated for Women magazine voted Joyner-Kersee the Greatest Female Athlete of the 20th century.”

And, 40 more!

 

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London 2012: women earn more medals, compete in more events, and represent more countries

Clearly, the U.S. has the best women in the world.

As the London Olympics near their end, one of the biggest, most significant storylines is the dominance of America’s female athletes. There’s no other word for it. It’s because of the women — not the men — that the United States stands atop the medal table. – The Modesto Bee

Our ladies have also pulled in twice as many gold medals as the men.

And that’s despite the fact that 10 percent fewer women’s medals have been awarded so far. – Seattle PI

 

Altogether, women represent 44% of the Olympic athletes, up from 26% at the 1988 Seoul Olympic Games. Thirty-four countries sent more women than men to compete.

Finally, a nice article from USA Today exploring this historic shift:

Something historic and even a little strange is happening in the 2012 London Games. A nation that has been known for wielding a strong male chauvinistic sports streak has fallen in love with its female athletes. And it’s not just the Brits. American female athletes, outnumbering their male counterparts for the first time in an Olympics, are having their finest Games so far, outpacing the men in gold medals 18-10. Overall, they’ve won 53% of all U.S. medals, up considerably from 31% in the 1988 Olympics in Seoul.