Tag Archives: illustration

Discover Britain’s best (and weirdest) artist – the Turner Prize 2012

Every year the Tate Gallery in London awards the Turner Prize to Britain’s weirdest artist. The award is £25,000 and there are four finalists exhibiting their work:

  • Paul Noble – drawings of his invented city “Nobson Newtown” and scatological sculptures (poo statutes).
  • Spartacus Chetwynd – medieval morality plays with characters dressed like trees.
  • Luke Fowler – a film covering the life and work of maverick Scottish psychiatrist RD Laing (1927-89), and photographs of people in everyday poses.
  • Elizabeth Price – a film in three parts, The Woolworths Choir of 1979, about a fire in 1979 that killed 10 people set to the music of girl pop bands.

The winner is selected on December 3, 2012.

Photos of their work and a video of the exhibitions with Adrian Searle.

 

Intricate drawing of Nobson Newtown by Paul Noble. (source: Jonathan Hordle/Rex Features)

 

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The Periodic Table as Illustrated Cartoons

In Bunpei Yorifuji’s new book, Wonderful Life with the Elements, each element in the periodic table has personality. From the scary poison of Beryllium to the battery power of Lithium. And not to forget Carbon:

It’s wonderful book and worth buying for only $10. More images from the book are available at Brain Pickings.

I also recommend Bunpei’s past work, the humorous Tokyo Metro “etiquette” posters – Do It At Home.

 

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Dr. Seuss – before his children’s books, he drew great ads

Before we knew him as Dr. Seuss, he was Theodore Seuss Geisel, adman. As early as 1927 he was illustrating ads for Ford, GE and NBC campaigns. His illustrative style was the same, even then.

- Via JESS3

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The illustration process for children’s books

It seems pretty straightforward right? Draft a story and get an illustrator to come up with some imagery to coincide with the storyline and you’re off to the presses. Not quite! Here’s a quick overview of the illustration process Where Albatross Soar has gone through.

 

A fascinating process, here are just a few steps:

Step 4 – Color Explorations: Colors set the mood for the story and are an important part of establishing the visual direction. As consumers, we have an unconscious emotional response to certain colors – again a science in and of itself. Sherwin paints some of the sketches to explore different color combinations and we discuss the intended change in mood & flow from page to page. Color explorations below:

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Little League – webcomic of DC superheroes as children in elementary school

Little League is an awesome web comic that imagines all of DC’s superheroes as kids. Batman, Superman, Wonder Woman all spend their days walking home from school, playing at recess, and attempting to save the world.

It’s super funny and cute!

“Little League” is a side project of “Gifted” creator Yale Stewart. A weekly webcomic, it follows the adventures of popular DC comic characters as children in elementary school. Mostly funny, with a dash of pathos, it should be an enjoyable read for any fans of DC Comics characters as well as people who enjoy the traditional syndicated comic strip.

These are comics #20-21 and you can read all the old ones on the Little League website (I’ve already done so!).

 

Historical and Recreational Map of Los Angeles – by Jo Mora, 1942

“Historical and Recreational Map of Los Angeles,” designed by Jo Mora in 1942 and dedicated to his “buen amigo” Charles Lummis. The map squeezes in an extraordinary amount of historical facts and figures onto its 23- by 30-inch surface, depicting almost the entire history of Los Angeles up to that point, while looking toward the future.

Mora took a humorous approach to issues surrounding the tangled history of Los Angeles. The amount of detail is astounding, covering a huge spectrum – from the city’s water wars to the rise of the film industry. Excerpts don’t do the map justice (you owe it to yourself to go look at the full size map at the exhibit), but observing the details reveals Mora’s keen understanding of the city.

via KCET

 
Here are some excerpts from the map.
 

The founding of the city:

“Sunshine and mañana + love and fandangos = a delightful Pacific Arcadia.”

“I hereby name this first subdivision in Alta California - Nuestra Señora la Reina de los Ángeles de Porciúncula”

 

Population growth of L.A.:

“Please help me figure out what IS the matter with the L.A. climate?”

 

The Beach and Conquistadores:

“Such different from our time…no?”

“Seguro que si (of course it is), but what muchachas!”

Winter watercolor – a beautiful illustration of a pretty girl

Pen, ink, watercolor. Winter inspired ink drawing for the cold days that have dominated our December.

This drawing is based on one of my student assistants. It is a relatively quick portrait sketch.

The fun part is working with a model that has large expressive-eyes. The addition of a “fur” neck-warmer seemed to balance out the drawing and help it feel finished.

In the end, I decided to add watercolor because I goofed up a few of the ink strokes and I wanted another element to minimize the importance of the wayward marks!

(the inked area is about 12 x 18 inches)

Daniel Ibanez