Tag Archives: superman

Man of Steel – new 2013 Superman movie is an origins story, Christopher Nolan style

If Superman and Batman duked it out, who would win? The question put Man of Steel director Zack Snyder in a tough spot, since The Dark Knight Rises auteur Christopher Nolan is the guy who hired him to make the new Superman movie.

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Snyder and new Superman actor Henry Cavill showed off new Man of Steel footage Saturday that operates on the premise that “this is the first Superman movie,” Snyder said. “We respect the canon and we knew the comic book exists; the movies are their own thing. When we started, we had to act as if no film had been made. We approached it in our head as if we’re making a Superman movie for the first time.”

The clip teased an earnest origins story rooted in the heartland, where young Clark Kent grows up on an American-as-apple-pie farm and displays heroic powers as a child that makes him feel like an outcast. Later, the classic red cape waves heroically in the breeze and Superman soars into the heavens per standard iconography, but there’s also contemporary inflections when Superman mixes it up with military troops that look like they could have been airlifted straight out of Iraq or Afghanistan.

“A lot of times in the past, Superman has been this big blue Boy Scout up on a throne that nobody can really touch.”

 

 

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Comic-Con goes LGBT in 2012 – costumes, panels, & storylines

Caped crusaders are out and proud this year at Comic-Con International. Even Superman and Batman at the Prism Comics booth wear snug Underoos, capes and chef’s aprons — but not much else — as they entertain passersby.

“It feels revolutionary,” says Scott Covert, decked out as Batman’s sidekick, Robin, at one of the convention’s many panels about gay culture and the comic book world. He flips the lip of his cape as he adds, “There’s more tolerance this year.”

Gay Geekdom celebrated last month when Marvel’s mutant superhero, Northstar, married his longtime partner, Kyle, in “Astonishing X-Men No. 51.” The day the issue was released, comic book shops nationwide, including L.A.’s Meltdown Comics, hosted commitment ceremonies, vow renewals or parties; and there was a legal same-sex wedding at Midtown Comics in Manhattan.

Also in June, DC Comics resurrected the original Golden Age Green Lantern, featuring Alan Scott as a gay man. Even Archie Comics’ All-American Riverdale was the site of a biracial, military-themed, same-sex wedding earlier this year.

 

More on this – Hero Complex: Comic-Con: Gay characters enjoying new prominence, tolerance

 

 

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Mother’s Day cards from Super Heroes

While many of us here in the real world will be ordering flowers or taking our moms out for a nice dinner, things in the world of super-heroes are probably going to get a little more awkward.

Still, everybody deserves something nice every once in a while, which is why today, your pals at ComicsAlliance are taking a look at a few Mother’s Day Cards From Your Favorite Super-Heroes!

via Comics Alliance

Wonder Woman

 

Superman

 

Damian Wayne (Batman's son)

 

Doctor Doom

Little League – webcomic of DC superheroes as children in elementary school

Little League is an awesome web comic that imagines all of DC’s superheroes as kids. Batman, Superman, Wonder Woman all spend their days walking home from school, playing at recess, and attempting to save the world.

It’s super funny and cute!

“Little League” is a side project of “Gifted” creator Yale Stewart. A weekly webcomic, it follows the adventures of popular DC comic characters as children in elementary school. Mostly funny, with a dash of pathos, it should be an enjoyable read for any fans of DC Comics characters as well as people who enjoy the traditional syndicated comic strip.

These are comics #20-21 and you can read all the old ones on the Little League website (I’ve already done so!).

 

Top 20 Comic Books of 2011

  1. Justice League #1
  2. Batman #1
  3. Action Comics (Superman) #1
  4. Justice League #2
  5. Batman #2
  6. Ultimate Comics Spider-Man #160
  7. Green Lantern #1
  8. Justice League #3
  9. Action Comics #2
  10. Detective Comics (Batman) #1
  11. Batman #3
  12. Flash #1
  13. Fantastic Four #587
  14. Fear Itself #1
  15. Superman #1
  16. Green Lantern #2
  17. Justice League #4
  18. Amazing Spider-Man #666
  19. Action Comics #3
  20. Batman #4

 

Overall sales for Comics, Trade Paperbacks, and Magazines for 2011:

$417 million (down less than 1% year-over-year)

 

* Data represents books sold to North American comics shops as reported by Diamond Comic Distributors

The best comic book movies of all time – according to the critics

Ranked according to Rotten Tomatoes ratings (see bottom for a full explanation)

 

35. The Adventures of Tintin – 2011 – 74%

34. V for Vendetta – 2006 – 73%

33. The Mask – 1994 – 75%

32. Ghost in the Shell – 1995 – 94%

31. Superman Returns – 2006 – 76%

 

30 – Thor – 2011 – 77%

29 – Batman Returns – 1992 – 78%

28 – Sin City – 2005 – 78%

27 - Captain America: The First Avenger – 2011 – 79%

26 – Hellboy – 2004 – 80%

25 – Flash Gordon – 1980 – 81%

24 – Oldboy – 2005 – 80%

23 – Iron Man 2 – 2010 – 74%

22 – Scott Pilgrim vs. The World – 2010 – 81%

21 – Batman: The Movie – 1966 – 82%

 

20 – X-Men - 2000 - 81%

19 – Kick-Ass – 2010 – 76%

18 – Road to Perdition – 2002 – 82%

17 – The Crow – 1994 – 83%

16 – Batman Begins – 2005 – 85%

15 – A History of Violence – 2005 – 85%

14 – X-Men: First Class – 2011 – 87%

13 – Akira - 1988 - 88%

12 – Superman 2 - 1980 - 88%

11 – Hellboy 2: The Golden Army - 2008 - 87%

 

10 – X2: X-men United - 2003 - 88%

9 – Spider-Man - 2002 - 89%

8 – Men in Black - 1997 - 91%

7 – Ghost World - 2001 - 92%

6 – Spider-Man 2 - 2004 - 93%

5 – American Splendor - 2003 - 94%

4 – Superman: The Movie - 1978 - 94%

3 – The Dark Knight - 2008 - 93%

2 – Iron Man - 2008 - 94%

1 – Persepolis - 2007 - 97%

 

To celebrate the 2010 Comic-Con, we present to you Comics & Graphic Novels vs. the Critics, an exhaustive countdown that includes movies based on everything from superheroes to graphic novels, from manga to strips from the funny pages, in order of critical approval.

Here’s the breakdown:

  • Every movie here originates from a comic book source of some kind, not another medium (we know about the Alien vs. Predator graphic novels, but the movies aren’t based on the comics).
  • Only movies with 20 or more reviews are included (sorry, Fritz the Cat)
  • Weighted formula that takes release year and number of reviews into account
  • Omitted all TV or straight-to-DVD flicks.

via Rotten Tomatoes – 120 best comic movies

 

*Note: I added in 5 new critically acclaimed comic movies that came out after 2010*

Why I walked out on Waiting For Superman

You want know what the hardest part about being a teacher in the US is?

It’s living in a culture where everybody thinks they can teach. Which is like saying everybody can be a doctor. Yet that is exactly what happens in teaching.

Everybody knows how to teach and they all get involved. They espouse opinions and beliefs. It’s like teaching is some mystic art that no one knows how to solve.

In the documentary, Waiting For Superman, Davis Guggenheim explores teaching like it is a mystical mess. He focuses on the system and how hard parents are trying. Why tenure sometimes gets in the way, etc. Not really anything different than what’s been said for 50 years.

Here’s something different. It takes three years minimum to become just a good teacher. Five years, minimum, to become a master teacher. Including the one year of post-grad that is six years to master the skill of teaching. If you are good. If you don’t have the right mentoring or curriculum help it could be 7-8 years. How long does it take to be a doctor, or a lawyer or accountant?

What would change if we all thought about teachers as equal to doctors:

- We might give parents and the PTA’s less input into schools (they’re the reason why we have tenure and it’s issues).

- The role of an “active parent” would switch from blaming schools and “watching” teachers to reading, helping with math, and going beyond the classroom to teach new lessons.

- The “business” of teaching would be more like hospitals. With an MBA handling the money, HR executive handling the hiring/firing/development, and master teachers handling the education.

- Lastly, and most importantly, we would all understand that our 12 years of being a student in no way makes us experts. Instead it makes us biased, bitter, and unable to help (at all) until we become master teachers (or at the very least learn something about education).

I really hoped Davis would explore these problems but instead he gave an uneducated “parents view” of education. Thanks a lot bud, you used ur considerable skill and prominence to just make things worse.

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*I posted this in Facebook at 11:21pm on October 9th, just after leaving the theatre*