YouTube adds face blurring to videos – to protect anonymity of activists in troubled countries

As citizens continue to play a critical role in supplying news and human rights footage from around the world, YouTube is committed to creating even better tools to help them. According to the international human rights organization WITNESS’ Cameras Everywhere report, “No video-sharing site or hardware manufacturer currently offers users the option to blur faces or protect identity.”

YouTube is excited to be among the first.

Today we’re launching face blurring – a new tool that allows you to obscure faces within videos with the click of a button.

Whether you want to share sensitive protest footage without exposing the faces of the activists involved, or share the winning point in your 8-year-old’s basketball game without broadcasting the children’s faces to the world, our face blurring technology is a first step towards providing visual anonymity for video on YouTube.

 

Keep reading: The Official YouTube Blog – Face blurring: when footage requires anonymity

 

 

Continue reading YouTube adds face blurring to videos – to protect anonymity of activists in troubled countries

Art of the week – 1 in 5 teenagers will experiment with art

(image: Andy Kluthe)

 

Continue reading Art of the week – 1 in 5 teenagers will experiment with art

Art, icons, and posters of Occupy Wall Street

This project and this movement is about mobilizing the masses and nothing is more important than numbers when it comes to a protest’s strength and longevity.

That is why we are providing everyone with free downloadable posters, graciously provided by graphic designers around the country, to not only promote this site and efforts down on Wall St. but to help mobilize in other communities, to inspire, to promote, to inform, and to strengthen the occupiers’ efforts.

Occupy Together

Here are my favorites of the 50+ available:

Continue reading Art, icons, and posters of Occupy Wall Street

Shepard Fairey discusses how he came up with artwork for Time's Protester of the Year

I’m happy with this Time cover mostly because I’m proud to help acknowledge and amplify the influence of protest movements this year, especially Occupy Wall Street. Exposure leads to dialogue, and I’m glad that the issues Occupy is concerned with are finally being discussed.

With the cover image I wanted to capture the dedication and spirit of defiance that any protester must possess in the face of arrest or worse.

Time provided me with images to sift through and I illustrated from a photograph that I thought would be a good reference for an iconic and compelling protester. In my art I try to emphasize the most powerful essence of an image and eliminate anything superfluous. In this case I felt there was a powerful contrast between the intensity of her eyes and her unthreatening yellow knit beanie. I wanted the protester to come across as serious, but not scary. Most of the protesters I’ve met are normal, idealistic, young adults, so I thought the “person next door” feel was important.  Ironically, I found out that the subject of the photo I illustrated from is an LA resident and employee of the Robert Berman gallery who I have worked with. I hope to meet or speak to her at some point.

This Time issue is a documentation of an irrefutable  phenomenon, not an incitement to protest(I wish I had that degree of influence over Time’s agenda) even though I do encourage people to stand up for their beliefs and protest if necessary . Regardless, if this Time cover encourages others to stand up for their ideals, I think it is a victory.

Shepard

And, the artwork:

Continue reading Shepard Fairey discusses how he came up with artwork for Time's Protester of the Year

Shepard Fairey discusses how he came up with artwork for Time’s Protester of the Year

I’m happy with this Time cover mostly because I’m proud to help acknowledge and amplify the influence of protest movements this year, especially Occupy Wall Street. Exposure leads to dialogue, and I’m glad that the issues Occupy is concerned with are finally being discussed.

With the cover image I wanted to capture the dedication and spirit of defiance that any protester must possess in the face of arrest or worse.

Time provided me with images to sift through and I illustrated from a photograph that I thought would be a good reference for an iconic and compelling protester. In my art I try to emphasize the most powerful essence of an image and eliminate anything superfluous. In this case I felt there was a powerful contrast between the intensity of her eyes and her unthreatening yellow knit beanie. I wanted the protester to come across as serious, but not scary. Most of the protesters I’ve met are normal, idealistic, young adults, so I thought the “person next door” feel was important.  Ironically, I found out that the subject of the photo I illustrated from is an LA resident and employee of the Robert Berman gallery who I have worked with. I hope to meet or speak to her at some point.

This Time issue is a documentation of an irrefutable  phenomenon, not an incitement to protest(I wish I had that degree of influence over Time’s agenda) even though I do encourage people to stand up for their beliefs and protest if necessary . Regardless, if this Time cover encourages others to stand up for their ideals, I think it is a victory.

Shepard

And, the artwork:

Continue reading Shepard Fairey discusses how he came up with artwork for Time’s Protester of the Year

Most Epic Photos: Tank Man

from Wikipedia

The incident took place near Tiananmen on Chang’an Avenue, which runs east-west along the south end of the Forbidden City in Beijing, on June 5, 1989, one day after the Chinese government’s violent crackdown on the Tiananmen protests.

The man placed himself alone in the middle of the street as the tanks approached, directly in the path of the armored vehicles. He held two shopping bags, one in each hand. As the tanks came to a stop, the man gestured towards the tanks with his bags.

In response, the lead tank attempted to drive around the man, but the man repeatedly stepped into the path of the tank in a show of nonviolent action.

After repeatedly attempting to go around rather than crush the man, the lead tank stopped its engines, and the armored vehicles behind it seemed to follow suit. There was a pause for a short period of time with the man and the tanks having reached a quiet, still impasse.

Having successfully brought the column to a halt, the man climbed onto the hull of the buttoned-up lead tank and, after briefly stopping at the driver’s hatch, appeared in video footage of the incident to call into various ports in the tank’s turret.

He then climbed atop the turret and seemed to have a short conversation with a crew member at the gunner’s hatch. After ending the conversation, the man alighted from the tank. The tank commander briefly emerged from his hatch, and the tanks restarted their engines, ready to continue on.

At that point, the man, who was still standing within a meter or two from the side of the lead tank, leapt in front of the vehicle once again and quickly reestablished the man–tank standoff.

Video footage shows that two figures in blue attire then pulled the man away and disappeared with him into a nearby crowd; the tanks continued on their way. Eyewitnesses disagree about the identity of the people who pulled him aside. Jan Wong is convinced the group were concerned citizens helping him away.

showing his hesitation...I think the full video shows a man angry in a momentary rage, not sure of how far to push things..what do you think?

The Video

Etc.

YouTube also features a documentary on this moment, check out the playlist.

A lego recreation from Flickr user Balakov

Modern day Tiananmen Square