Tag Archives: population

Apple stores saw 300 million visits last year, there are 311 million in the United States

From Jim Dalrymple of The Loop:

According to Apple, the company has seen almost 300 million worldwide visitors so far in its fiscal 2012…To give you some type of comparison, by July 2011, the population of the United States was estimated to be 311 million people.

There is also an interesting data point from Apple’s retail Genius Bar. According to the company, 50,000 people get serviced at a Genius Bar around the world, every single day.

 

That’s no joke. Stand outside an Apple store for a few minutes and you will see hordes of people, of all ages and types, looking for help.

It’s actually quite impressive that they haven’t had any major problems with customer service.

 

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The rise of mountain lions in the Midwest

Cougars are on the rise in the Midwest. From 1990 to 2008, the number of sightings confirmed by wildlife professionals increased. That’s good news for fans of big cats, which were extirpated from most of that area around 1900.

Here’s a breakdown of the rise of mountain lions in the Midwest, by the numbers.

3: Number of known breeding populations that now exist in the Midwest: In the Black Hills of South Dakota, in the North Dakota Badlands, and in western Nebraska.

8: Percent of land in the Midwest that makes for suitable cougar habitat.

0: The number of cougars the average person is likely to see in the wild in their lifetime. “Really, one of the most important things I like to make sure people know is that it’s very unlikely that they will ever see or encounter a cougar,” says Michelle LaRue. “It’s slightly more likely than winning the lottery; your chances aren’t that great. But with that said, always be aware of your surroundings, especially in the wilderness.”

 

Source: Outside – By the numbers: The Rise of Mountain Lions in the Midwest

 
 

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As environmental regulations boost seal populations in New England – great whites return as well

This week, several great white sharks were spotted off the coast of Chatham, Mass., and two more near Cape Cod were swimming just 30 feet from the shore. One of the sharks was measured at 12 to 15 feet.

The summer months induce a chain reaction for shark sightings: Warm ocean temperatures entice more gray seals to the New England shores, and with more seals come more sharks.

The sharks have been paying more attention to New England the past few years because of the larger concentrations of gray seals, Massachusetts Division of Marine Fisheries Researcher Greg Skomal said. The gray seal population off Cape Cod has grown from 10,000 to over 300,000 ever since environmental regulations were put in place to protect the seals.

The United States averages 16 shark attacks each year, with only one fatality every two years. According to the International Shark Attack File, you have a higher chance of being struck by lightning, which kills about 41 people a year.

Zimmerman said there hasn’t been a confirmed shark attack in Massachusetts since 1936.

 

More on thisGreat White Sharks Return to Massachusetts Shores

 

 

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The most visited countries in the world

  1. France – 77 million
  2. United States – 61 million
  3. China – 56 million
  4. Spain – 53 million
  5. Italy – 43 million
  6. United Kingdom – 28 million
  7. Turkey – 27 million
  8. Germany – 27 million
  9. Malaysia – 25 million
  10. Mexico – 22 million

 

Interesting to note that both France and Spain receive more visitors than their entire population:

  • France – population 65 million – with 77 million annual visitors
  • Spain – population 46 million – with 53 million visitors.

That’s quite a tourism business for them.

Not to worry as the world seems ready to travel more than ever. Sometime this year we will set a record with 1 billion international tourists, and the graph below shows that at least half of them are heading to Europe!

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Progress in the Middle East – if you measure by the number of Facebook users

There are growing signs of progress in the Middle East, if you measure by the total number of Facebook users. That number has skyrocketed since 2010, going from 15 million to near 40 million.

Of those users, a growing number are starting to prefer using the site in their own native language, Arabic.

Of the 39+ million Arabic users on Facebook, 39% prefer to view the site in their native language, while 36% like it in English.

As more users in the region are coming online, with an obvious desire to access sites in Arabic, there is a rising demand for content that appeals to them, and quite a few social media sites are trying to meet that demand.

Twitter recently added support for right-to-left languages, including in Arabic, while Storify is working with a team of volunteers in the Middle East to translate their interface into Arabic.

Arabic is one of the fastest growing languages on sites like Twitter and Wikipedia, and with Yahoo having just licensed the technology behind smart transliteration tool Yamli, it is becoming increasingly easy for Arabic speakers to interact in their mother tongue online.

via The Next Web

 

The numbers are not overwhelming, by any means, considering that there are 152 million users in the U.S. and 232 million in Europe, but it is a positive sign.

 

// Photo – Sean MacEntee

Historical and Recreational Map of Los Angeles – by Jo Mora, 1942

“Historical and Recreational Map of Los Angeles,” designed by Jo Mora in 1942 and dedicated to his “buen amigo” Charles Lummis. The map squeezes in an extraordinary amount of historical facts and figures onto its 23- by 30-inch surface, depicting almost the entire history of Los Angeles up to that point, while looking toward the future.

Mora took a humorous approach to issues surrounding the tangled history of Los Angeles. The amount of detail is astounding, covering a huge spectrum – from the city’s water wars to the rise of the film industry. Excerpts don’t do the map justice (you owe it to yourself to go look at the full size map at the exhibit), but observing the details reveals Mora’s keen understanding of the city.

via KCET

 
Here are some excerpts from the map.
 

The founding of the city:

“Sunshine and mañana + love and fandangos = a delightful Pacific Arcadia.”

“I hereby name this first subdivision in Alta California - Nuestra Señora la Reina de los Ángeles de Porciúncula”

 

Population growth of L.A.:

“Please help me figure out what IS the matter with the L.A. climate?”

 

The Beach and Conquistadores:

“Such different from our time…no?”

“Seguro que si (of course it is), but what muchachas!”

1493: Columbus created China’s population boom and the Little Ice Age (book review)

I’ve found a fascinating new book along the lines of Guns, Germs, and Steel. This one called 1493: Uncovering the New World Columbus Created by Charles C. Mann.

For some insight into what it’s all about, here are some excerpts from the author.

Via the Bloomberg Presents Podcast

Introduction

The Eastern and Western Hemispheres had been separated for 10s of millions of years, Pangaea. Columbus brought them together again causing an ecological convulsion, effectively creating Pangaea again.

On these European ships were passengers, beyond people, like plants, animals and micro-organisms. The most well-known were the diseases that wiped out some 90% of the population. Going the other way, you get foods, particularly the potato in Ireland.

Also, there is sweet potato and corn, particularly in China, where it has an equally large impact.

Columbus created China’s Population Boom

China, if you look at it on a map, one of the striking things is that it doesn’t have any big lakes or big bodies of water only these two major rivers, the Yellow and Yangtze. Other than that most of China is dry hills. So China has 20% of the world’s people and about 7% of the worlds fresh water.

Beyond that it gets even more out of whack because the main crop of China is rice which has to be grown in big fresh-water swimming pools. This creates a real tension and has been a major problem for every Chinese ruler to the present day.

In about 1600, corn and sweet potato come into China and they resulted in a huge harvest.  It was very, very productive and able to grown in dry land. Those dry hills turned into productive land and the Chinese fanned out into Western China to start planting corn and sweet potato.

The result was big boom in food supply, one historian put it at a 50% increase. As a result the population boomed and led to the crowded China that we know today.

The Little Ice Age – Global Cooling

When the native people died in massive numbers due to European diseases, they stopped impacting their environment. Doing things like burning fields, planting crops. All these open areas across both continents began filling in with trees. The result was that it drew carbon dioxide out of the air. An increasing number of studies show the carbon dioxide levels dropping with the arrival of Columbus.

This caused the Earth to get colder and caused what histories call the Little Ice Age.

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1493: Columbus created China's population boom and the Little Ice Age (book review)

I’ve found a fascinating new book along the lines of Guns, Germs, and Steel. This one called 1493: Uncovering the New World Columbus Created by Charles C. Mann.

For some insight into what it’s all about, here are some excerpts from the author.

Via the Bloomberg Presents Podcast

Introduction

The Eastern and Western Hemispheres had been separated for 10s of millions of years, Pangaea. Columbus brought them together again causing an ecological convulsion, effectively creating Pangaea again.

On these European ships were passengers, beyond people, like plants, animals and micro-organisms. The most well-known were the diseases that wiped out some 90% of the population. Going the other way, you get foods, particularly the potato in Ireland.

Also, there is sweet potato and corn, particularly in China, where it has an equally large impact.

Columbus created China’s Population Boom

China, if you look at it on a map, one of the striking things is that it doesn’t have any big lakes or big bodies of water only these two major rivers, the Yellow and Yangtze. Other than that most of China is dry hills. So China has 20% of the world’s people and about 7% of the worlds fresh water.

Beyond that it gets even more out of whack because the main crop of China is rice which has to be grown in big fresh-water swimming pools. This creates a real tension and has been a major problem for every Chinese ruler to the present day.

In about 1600, corn and sweet potato come into China and they resulted in a huge harvest.  It was very, very productive and able to grown in dry land. Those dry hills turned into productive land and the Chinese fanned out into Western China to start planting corn and sweet potato.

The result was big boom in food supply, one historian put it at a 50% increase. As a result the population boomed and led to the crowded China that we know today.

The Little Ice Age – Global Cooling

When the native people died in massive numbers due to European diseases, they stopped impacting their environment. Doing things like burning fields, planting crops. All these open areas across both continents began filling in with trees. The result was that it drew carbon dioxide out of the air. An increasing number of studies show the carbon dioxide levels dropping with the arrival of Columbus.

This caused the Earth to get colder and caused what histories call the Little Ice Age.

Continue reading

The Earth is filling up, by NPR (video)

It was just over two centuries ago that the global population was 1 billion — in 1804. But better medicine and improved agriculture resulted in higher life expectancy for children, dramatically increasing the world population, especially in the West.

As higher standards of living and better health care are reaching more parts of the world, the rates of fertility — and population growth — have started to slow down, though the population will continue to grow for the foreseeable future.

U.N. forecasts suggest the world population could hit a peak of 10.1 billion by 2100 before beginning to decline. But exact numbers are hard to come by — just small variations in fertility rates could mean a population of 15 billion by the end of the century.