Tag Archives: mountain lion

Apple releases Mountain Lion 10.8.1 – now’s a good time to update/buy

Mac OS 10.8.1 Mountain Lion released

Apple just released OSX 10.8.1 Mountain Lion via Software Update. The delta update weighs a paltry 7.28MB on my Retina MacBook Pro, but your mileage may vary. Apple did not confirm reports that 10.8.1 improves battery life but many other issues appear to be resolved.

A rather intelligent friend of mine told me that when Apple comes out with something new it’s always best to wait for the stable release. That usually is the next release and typically means the point-one (10.8.1) package.

In this case he was definitely right. My computer has been slowing down like a hog in mud. It’s good to have this release.
Continue reading

There is a mountain lion in central Los Angeles, prowling around Griffith Park

It’s true, in fact, there are several of them but mostly in the nature reserves of the Santa Monica Mountains. This one is different because it is truly in the heart of LA, Griffith Park.

 

 

Surrounded by freeways on two sides, Hollywood and downtown on the others, this is truly an urban area. Which makes it all the more interesting that the lion even made it into the park:

In an odyssey of perhaps 20 miles, the cat had to cross concrete and backyards, dodge commuter traffic and thread an obstacle course of culverts, bridges and roads…(it) might have traversed a bridge or culvert to cross the 101 and 405 freeways to enter the park. It’s possible, however, that the cat sprinted across lanes of traffic — and got very lucky. In a study of the 405, scientists have documented two deaths of lions killed by motorists. – L.A. Times

Fortunately, the cat (also known as a cougar) is extremely solitary and mostly nocturnal. It shouldn’t pose any harm to park-goers while enjoying the plentiful mule deer in the area. Not to mention, the beautiful views of downtown Los Angeles, the celebrity-packed Hollywood Hills, and that never-ending traffic of LA.

The L.A. Times has a nice write-up about the history of lions in the park, including the fact that several Angelenos claimed to see a lion and nobody believed them until now - Mountain lion makes itself at home in Griffith Park

Also, check out the spread of mountain lions from their dominant home, the Western U.S., and back into the Midwest (North Dakota, Minnesota, Wisconsin).

 

 

Continue reading

The most complete review of Apple’s new OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion – the ars technica review

It’s bold, it’s brash, and it’s 25 pages long. Don’t worry it has a table of contents. If you’re short on time, read the TOC and you’ll be up-to-date. Otherwise, sit back and dig in for a feature rich update on your favorite computer.

 

Apple’s traditional desktop computing business has suffered many indignities over the past decade. Once Apple’s flagship product line, the Mac first found itself playing second fiddle to the iPod—a mere music player—in the early 2000s. Today, matters are worse; on a graph of Apple’s revenues, the Mac now appears as a thin strip of earth while iOS devices are the mountain that sits upon it.

Apple presented last year’s release of OS X 10.7 Lion as part of a turn “back to the Mac.” Ostensibly, the tagline was Apple’s promise to bring innovations from its mobile operating system back to Mac OS X. But more broadly, it also meant that the Mac would receive more of Apple’s attention.

That attention resulted in some dramatic changes to aspects of the operating system that had not been reconsidered in decades: application launching, the document model, process management—even basics like window resizing and scrolling. As Apple’s newly refocused gaze fell upon its desktop operating system, many parts of it were deemed archaic and unworthy of continued existence.

At the end of last year’s Lion review, I concluded: “[Lion] marks the point where Mac OS X releases stop being defined by what’s been added. From now on, Mac OS X should be judged by what’s been removed.” Unfortunately, the surgery was not a complete success. There were… complications.

 

Source: ars technica - OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion: the Ars Technica review

 

 

Continue reading

The rise of mountain lions in the Midwest

Cougars are on the rise in the Midwest. From 1990 to 2008, the number of sightings confirmed by wildlife professionals increased. That’s good news for fans of big cats, which were extirpated from most of that area around 1900.

Here’s a breakdown of the rise of mountain lions in the Midwest, by the numbers.

3: Number of known breeding populations that now exist in the Midwest: In the Black Hills of South Dakota, in the North Dakota Badlands, and in western Nebraska.

8: Percent of land in the Midwest that makes for suitable cougar habitat.

0: The number of cougars the average person is likely to see in the wild in their lifetime. “Really, one of the most important things I like to make sure people know is that it’s very unlikely that they will ever see or encounter a cougar,” says Michelle LaRue. “It’s slightly more likely than winning the lottery; your chances aren’t that great. But with that said, always be aware of your surroundings, especially in the wilderness.”

 

Source: Outside – By the numbers: The Rise of Mountain Lions in the Midwest

 
 

Continue reading

Apple’s WWDC 2012 Conference Preview – iOS 6, new Macs, iCloud update

This Monday, June 11, Apple will host one of its biggest events of the year, WWDC, at the Moscone Center in San Francisco, CA. First thing in the morning will be the famous Keynote presentation where Apple’s top brass takes the stage to preview the latest treasures in their chest.

Here are just a few of those expected to be announced:

  • iOS 6 – the banners advertising this at the conference are already being hung – a small update compared to iOS 5, but it does introduce Apple Maps (and kicks out Google Maps). A complete Facebook integration and bringing Siri to the iPad, among the rumors.
  • iCloud – photo-sharing to social media sites and video stream, where videos are synced in the cloud.
  • New Macs –  the consensus seems to indicate that the entire Mac lineup will be refreshed with Retina Displays. With that as the primary change there could also be a shrinking of the MacBook Pro size and multiple spec updates.

With Apple’s notorious secrecy there is the potential for multiple big surprises. Plus, this will be the first WWDC without Steve Jobs so it will be interesting to see how Tim Cook and crew pave the way.

For an in-depth look at all these new features9to5 Mac – WWDC 2012 Roundup

Continue reading

New Apple OSX adds share buttons for Vimeo, Flickr, Twitter – continuing to snub Facebook, Google

Apple’s decision to unfriend Facebook has turned out to be a boon for third-party social services that are now finding their way into Apple operating environments. The biggest winner of them all is Twitter. 

In iOS 5, Apple integrated Twitter. And just like that the company saw “sign-ups more than double and the number of tweets sent increase over 90 percent,” according to Dick Costolo, CEO of Twitter.

Well, Twitter is about to get a yet another boost, thanks to the upcoming release of the latest version of Mac OS X, called Mountain Lion.

Twitter, Flickr and Vimeo are some of the third-party services that will offered as part of new “share sheet” that allows you to share links, photos and videos directly from the app one is using on the Mac. (Interestingly, there is no YouTube in this share sheet?)

via GigaOm

 

The new "Share" button

 

The "Share Sheet" as it looks on iPhones, iPads

Apple, changing its ways after Steve via private product briefings

“We’re starting to do some things differently,” Phil Schiller said to me.

We were sitting in a comfortable hotel suite in Manhattan just over a week ago. I’d been summoned a few days earlier by Apple PR with the offer of a private “product briefing”. I had no idea heading into the meeting what it was about. I had no idea how it would be conducted. This was new territory for me, and I think, for Apple.

The meeting was structured and conducted very much like an Apple product announcement event. But instead of an auditorium with a stage and theater seating, it was simply with a couch, a chair, an iMac, and an Apple TV hooked up to a Sony HDTV. And instead of a room full of writers, journalists, and analysts, it was just me, Schiller, and two others from Apple.

Handshakes, a few pleasantries, good hot coffee, and then, well, then I got an Apple press event for one.

via John Gruber

Perhaps, Phil Schiller is doing several of these to learn the craft of “product briefing”?

We all know, from the Steve Jobs biography, that Steve spent a considerable amount of time perfecting his briefings and that skill came in very handy for Apple.