Tag Archives: new york times

N.Y. Times is now supported by readers, not advertisers

The New York Times Is Now Supported by Readers, Not Advertisers

At the company’s big three papers — the New York TimesInternational Herald Tribune, and Boston Globe — print and digital ad dollars dipped 6.6 percent to $220 million, while circulation revenue was up 8.3 percent to $233 million. The historical rebalancing may indicate a sea change in an industry that has long relied on advertising to stay afloat.

 

An interesting fact all by itself. Sending my mind along multiple future paths for the newspaper. Will readership shrink as it goes from free to paid? Can it still be the paper of record if it’s behind a paywall? Are they just forcing freeloading readers to go elsewhere?

It did send me to the Los Angeles Times, San Diego Union-Tribune, and, ironically, to social media for alternate news sources.

Though, I do have a bone to pick with one of the closing statements in the article, “…no longer depend on ad revenue, but must rely more than ever on the whims of the customer.”

I would have thought being free of advertisers to be a positive move. Is this a ‘thing’ in the newspaper industry that readers are so whimsical?

And, why does the New York media always have to insult its readers?

 

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Twitter will soon release a way to retrieve your old tweets

Trying to remember that pithy, brilliantly composed tweet about the latest Wes Anderson movie that you fired off a few months ago? You’re out of luck: Twitter gives users access only to the last few thousand posts made to the site.

But Dick Costolo, Twitter’s chief executive, promises that this will eventually change.

“We’re working on a tool to let users export all of their tweets,” Mr. Costolo said in a meeting with reporters and editors at The New York Times on Monday. “You’ll be able to download a file of them.”

Other social media services, most notably Facebook, already allow users to download a file with all their data. Twitter has been slower to roll out a similar service, although a number of third-party services and developers have cobbled together ways to let people sift through portions of Twitter’s vast collection of messages. One recently released site, called oldtweets, lets people root through some of the first messages ever sent through Twitter’s servers.

 

Source: N.Y. Times - Twitter Is Working on a Way to Retrieve Your Old Tweets

 

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‎10 Questions Couples Should Ask Each Other Before Getting Married

Yesterday, The New York Times posted Questions To Ask Before You Marry, which I then re-shared  in Facebook, setting off an interesting debate. Several of my happily married friends laughed, saying it’s overly pedantic. Me, I like to be thorough about any type of investment or venture I pursue, especially when there’s a contract involved.

What do you think? Does it scream “Written by an MBA” or should couples approach marriage more like a business investment/venture?

Here are the 10 questions:

1. What is our “mission statement” as a couple?
2. To what extent are you willing to go to have a family, medically?
3. What will we do if we find out our child has severe disabilities?
4. Who should I have on speed dial for the days when I just can’t figure you out?
5. Can you name two couples that you admire and would hope to emulate?
6. How do we stay sexually engaged with each other?
7. Will we share our credit reports with each other?
8. Should we have an exit strategy for the marriage, and if so, what would it be?
9. If married previously, why did it end and what did you learn from that relationship?
10. What are our conflict management styles, and are they compatible?

And in response to the “absurdity” of these questions, my friend, John Bordeaux, wrote this response, “Breaking Down Loves Checklist” – which is worth reading and reflection.

Question in Quorahttp://www.quora.com/Should-couples-approach-marriage-more-like-a-business-venture-investment

130 years of news for the L.A. Times, my favorite newspaper's birthday

1937, the Times Building, beautiful right, gives Batman's Gotham a run for its money.

 

The Los Angeles Times has the best newspaper website in the world. Their online presence is the fastest growing in the U.S., and for a technologist, like me, that is awesome.

I have their iPhone and iPad apps, including the LA Times Magazine app which is the best magazine app I’ve seen yet. I love their spinoff websites, like Hero Complex that talks all about super hero movies, science fiction, fantasy, and more.

Most importantly, the taste of the newspaper suits me. From the art and architecture to sports and business, I feel a kinship with the writing and focus. It’s really cool to find something like that.

Especially, when the gray lady is putting up paywalls and messing around with commenters. The New York Times is supposed to be our newspaper of record, and they do have some great journalists, but when it comes to winning over technologists they are far, far behind. I say that until they fully embrace the online world we avoid their site and make them earn that number one spot.

Anyway, back to the special paper of the day. Happy Birthday Los Angeles Times!

Keep up the good work and here’s to another 130 years.

Capturing history as it was made – The Times celebrates its birthday with a look back at some memorable photos and front pages

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130 years of news for the L.A. Times, my favorite newspaper’s birthday

1937, the Times Building, beautiful right, gives Batman's Gotham a run for its money.

 

The Los Angeles Times has the best newspaper website in the world. Their online presence is the fastest growing in the U.S., and for a technologist, like me, that is awesome.

I have their iPhone and iPad apps, including the LA Times Magazine app which is the best magazine app I’ve seen yet. I love their spinoff websites, like Hero Complex that talks all about super hero movies, science fiction, fantasy, and more.

Most importantly, the taste of the newspaper suits me. From the art and architecture to sports and business, I feel a kinship with the writing and focus. It’s really cool to find something like that.

Especially, when the gray lady is putting up paywalls and messing around with commenters. The New York Times is supposed to be our newspaper of record, and they do have some great journalists, but when it comes to winning over technologists they are far, far behind. I say that until they fully embrace the online world we avoid their site and make them earn that number one spot.

Anyway, back to the special paper of the day. Happy Birthday Los Angeles Times!

Keep up the good work and here’s to another 130 years.

Capturing history as it was made – The Times celebrates its birthday with a look back at some memorable photos and front pages

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NY Times updates it’s commenting system but still hates commenters

It’s amazing how long folks can ignore reality. On Wednesday, Nov 30, The New York Times announced a new version of their commenting system that still sucks.

They say it is about “improving the community experience” but it is really about assuaging their own egos. Let’s be honest here and point out that thousands of websites have no problems and several have developed systems that often make them better than the content.

Yet, here is the preeminent newspaper in the country and they are just now putting their comments on the same page as the article, and they are introducing threaded comments. LOL. The New York Times website, nytimes.com, was created 17 years ago in 1994, and they are just now making these changes?

Of course, the blogosphere is not even upset about this, rather it is the new “trusted commenter” function:

  • Trusted Commenters enjoy the privilege of commenting on articles and blog posts without moderation.
  • You must receive an invitation to become a Trusted Commenter. To be invited, you must have a lengthy history of comments that are thoughtful, discuss the issues politely and address the topics covered in the article or blog post.

Privilege…are they for real?

The truth here is that they are the problem, not us, the commenters. They don’t want to deal with their community or they think they are above it. Ivory tower and all that.

Maybe in the next 17 years of their web presence will they get over their revulsion of us lowly commenters.

I’m terribly vexed.

NY Times updates it's commenting system but still hates commenters

It’s amazing how long folks can ignore reality. On Wednesday, Nov 30, The New York Times announced a new version of their commenting system that still sucks.

They say it is about “improving the community experience” but it is really about assuaging their own egos. Let’s be honest here and point out that thousands of websites have no problems and several have developed systems that often make them better than the content.

Yet, here is the preeminent newspaper in the country and they are just now putting their comments on the same page as the article, and they are introducing threaded comments. LOL. The New York Times website, nytimes.com, was created 17 years ago in 1994, and they are just now making these changes?

Of course, the blogosphere is not even upset about this, rather it is the new “trusted commenter” function:

  • Trusted Commenters enjoy the privilege of commenting on articles and blog posts without moderation.
  • You must receive an invitation to become a Trusted Commenter. To be invited, you must have a lengthy history of comments that are thoughtful, discuss the issues politely and address the topics covered in the article or blog post.

Privilege…are they for real?

The truth here is that they are the problem, not us, the commenters. They don’t want to deal with their community or they think they are above it. Ivory tower and all that.

Maybe in the next 17 years of their web presence will they get over their revulsion of us lowly commenters.

I’m terribly vexed.

The Tao of Moonbeam and the Most Expensive Election Ever

I feel for Meg Whitman. The former candidate for Governor of California spent 141 million dollars of her own money and lost. A loss made even more bitter by how she lost. Old Moonbeam barely announced his candidacy, waiting till what seemed like the last possible moment. Then refusing to raise money or run TV ads until late in the game, even waiting till a month before the election for TV ads. Finally, Moonbeam just grumbled his way to the Governor’s mansion, proudly proclaiming his political-ness, grouchiness, and cheapness.

“In choosing the oldest man ever to run the young state of California, voters decided that a grumpy penny-pincher is just what they need at a time when the state is so broke it cannot fix park benches or investigate burglaries.”

Which I think is awesome! It’s so California. Just when you think it’s going one way the state diverts and heads down a completely new path. It does fit the name, The Tao of Moonbeam, as written by Timothy Egan in the New York Times. Which is a great opinion piece well worth reading.

I guess at this point you may be asking, who the hell is Moonbeam?

It’s Jerry Brown and the name comes from Linda Ronstadt when they were lovers. Apparently the name leaked to the press in 1976 and it has stuck ever since. Back then Jerry Brown was an Obama-like superstar. The young politician was good looking, twice the Governor of California, and often a president candidate.

The popular definition of the name was “young, idealistic, and non-traditional”. A reference that some thought would hurt ‘Governor Moonbeam’, and it probably did hurt his presidential ambitions, but in California it became a point of pride. Especially as the state rose to dominate the country with its economy and culture. The story gets better though as the feud between Jerry, Ronstadt, and the press heats up…for more on this check out, How Jerry Became ‘Governor Moonbeam’, by Jesse McKinley in the New York Times.

I love California!