Sign up for Google Fiber get a free Nexus tablet, or super-cheap internet for $3.57/mo

Today may very well live in infamy as the day the cable companies died. Internet giant Google announced its new, groundbreaking Google Fiber, a broadband service that will bring breakneck 1Gbps internet speed to Kansas City — service far faster and far cheaper than that offered by traditional cable companies.

How fast is Google’s 1Gbps service? Competitor Comcast recently announced it would launch 305Mbps speed service to much of the Northeast at a cost of $299.95 per month…at 1,000 Mbps, Google Fiber cost of just $70 per month.

Google Fiber allows you to combine your cable TV and internet service into one product, for just $120 per month. Getting service to your house will require you pay a $300 service initiation fee — a fee that’s waved if you agree to keep Google Fiber service for a minimum of two years.

And the remote control for your Google Fiber TV service? It’s a Nexus 7 tablet.

If you’re looking for a lower priced internet option, Google Fiber has you covered there, too. Anyone who pays the $300 connection fee can opt to receive 5Mbps service for free for seven years. That’s an unheard of bargain — you can essentially buy seven years’ worth of internet service for just $3.57 a month.

 

Keep reading: Tecca – Google launches Google Fiber, 1Gbps broadband service 100 times faster than what you have now

 

 

Continue reading Sign up for Google Fiber get a free Nexus tablet, or super-cheap internet for $3.57/mo

Netflix meets its heaviest user – 252 movies in one month

Mark Malkoff just can’t help himself. The new York-based comedian is one of those people who find challenges in everything. So when a company like Netflix offers unlimited streaming for $8 a month, someone like Malkoff starts to wonder about his own limits. Earlier this year, Malkoff embarked on his Netflix challenge in an attempt to figure out how much value he could get out of his $8 subscription within a single month. 30 days later, Malkoff had watched 252 movies, beginning to end, including the credits.

**that’s 8.4 movies/day**

Excessive use like this might have triggered automatic service suspension at other companies, but quickly Netflix realized the promotional potential of his challenge, and started tweeting about it. This week, the company even invited him to their headquarters where dozens of employees celebrated him as the most obsessive user the company ever had.

This isn’t the first time Malkoff has taken on an endurance challenge like this. A few years back, he successfully visited each and every of Starbucks’ 171 stores in Manhattan within 24 hours, consuming something at every store. Malkoff has also lived in an Ikea store for a week, and spent 30 days flying on an AirTran jet.

Read the full storyThe day Netflix met its heaviest user

 

Mark’s Netflix Challenge:

Celebrate Black History Month – buy the book “How To Be Black”

“Part autobiography, part stand-up routine, part contemporary political analysis, and astute all over.”

Raised by a pro-black, pan-Afrikan single mother during the crack years of 1980s Washington, DC, and educated at Sidwell Friends School and Harvard University, Baratunde Thurston has over thirty years’ experience in being black. Now, through stories of his politically inspired Nigerian name, the heroics of his hippie mother, the murder of his drug-abusing father, and other revelatory black details, he shares with readers of all colors his wisdom and expertise of HOW TO BE BLACK (Harper; February 2012; $23.99)

Combining personal memoir, interviews, irreverent how-to, and resource guides to meet every reader’s blackness needs, this book offers practical advice on everything from “How to Be The Black Friend” to “How to Be The (Next) Black President” to “How to Celebrate Black History Month.”

For additional perspective, Baratunde assembled an award-winning Black Panel—three black women, three black men, and one white man as a control group—and asked them such revealing questions as: “When Did You First Realize You Were Black?” “How Black Are You?” “Can You Swim?”

via HowToBeBlack.me

 

“As a black woman, this book helped me realize I’m actually a white man.”
– Patton Oswalt

 

 

 

Celebrate Black History Month – buy the book "How To Be Black"

“Part autobiography, part stand-up routine, part contemporary political analysis, and astute all over.”

Raised by a pro-black, pan-Afrikan single mother during the crack years of 1980s Washington, DC, and educated at Sidwell Friends School and Harvard University, Baratunde Thurston has over thirty years’ experience in being black. Now, through stories of his politically inspired Nigerian name, the heroics of his hippie mother, the murder of his drug-abusing father, and other revelatory black details, he shares with readers of all colors his wisdom and expertise of HOW TO BE BLACK (Harper; February 2012; $23.99)

Combining personal memoir, interviews, irreverent how-to, and resource guides to meet every reader’s blackness needs, this book offers practical advice on everything from “How to Be The Black Friend” to “How to Be The (Next) Black President” to “How to Celebrate Black History Month.”

For additional perspective, Baratunde assembled an award-winning Black Panel—three black women, three black men, and one white man as a control group—and asked them such revealing questions as: “When Did You First Realize You Were Black?” “How Black Are You?” “Can You Swim?”

via HowToBeBlack.me

 

“As a black woman, this book helped me realize I’m actually a white man.”
– Patton Oswalt

 

 

 

Family History Day: a new American holiday

Would you like to celebrate a new holiday with me?

I call it Family History Day, or Ancestors Day. 

Let’s celebrate it right before Halloween with a variety of fun and somber rituals, pulled from the most popular festivals around the world:

  • Qingming festival from East Asia
  • Día de los Muertos from Mexico
  • The rituals of Shinto in Japan.

From each I have chosen the best elements and combined them together to form a truly marvelous holiday. One that, I hope, will accomplish the goal: to gain wisdom. Wisdom is an elusive foe, one that evades us all our lives. Sometimes we find it right before we die or after a great tragedy, but none of us have it on a daily basis. This holiday is an attempt to find wisdom every year by seeking out those in our past who had it, for just a brief moment. It also formalizes the search into a ritual that can teach us about family, honor, and respect. Here is how other cultures celebrate.

Qingming

The Qingming Festival, often called Ancestors Day, occurs on the Spring Equinox, usually around April 15, and is celebrated in many countries from China to Cambodia. “Celebrants remember and honour their ancestors at grave sites. Young and old pray before the ancestors, sweep the tombs and offer food, tea, wine, chopsticks, paper accessories, and/or libations to the ancestors.” “It is also the time when young couples start courting. Families go on outings.” There is also a rich history of honoring ones ancestors through poetry and painting.

English Translation:

The ceaseless drizzle drips all the dismal day, So broken-hearted fares the traveler on the way. When asked where could be found a tavern bower, A cowboy points to yonder village of the apricot flower.

Día de loe Muertos

Día de los Muertos, translates as Day of the Dead, is celebrated in Mexico over two days, November 1-2. The first day honors children and second honors deceased relatives. It is a fun and morbid holiday that celebrates death with joy. Families create candy and treats for children in the shape of skulls and skeletons.

Young ones get involved with costumes and skeleton dolls at parties with dancing and music. Adults visit cemeteries to “build private altars containing the favorite foods and beverages as well as photos and memorabilia of the departed.” Celebrated on the Catholic holiday All Souls Day, the intent is to encourage visits by the souls, so that they will hear the prayers and the comments of the living directed to them. Celebrations can take a humorous tone, as celebrants remember funny events and anecdotes about the departed.

Shinto

Continue reading Family History Day: a new American holiday