Tag Archives: heart

Sunday surf film – a short video about Italian surfer David Pecchi

 

“I based everything on that part of the ocean called the beach – the border between common civilization and dreams…I chose the dreams and it’s like living in Wonderland.”

 

Block10 productions is proud to present David Pecchi, eclectic and talented surfer of the Onde Nostre Crew, shot in Italy, California, Indonesia.

Ritratti Di Surf is a series of short videos about surfers, shapers, artists and other characters somehow connected to Onde Nostre and the Italian surf culture.

 

“Us Italians we don’t have waves but we have a heart, big like this, more. Even bigger than the brain. We have passion. We suffer, we wait for waves for months, and after a month of flat spell when we get a 2 foot wind swell. If you really like surfing, you paddle out and give it all you got.”

***

Directed by Luca Merli
Edited by Giovanni “Sbrokked” Barberis and Luca Merli
Photography by Luca Merli, Matteo Ferrari and Giovanni “Sbrokked” Barberis.
Additional Photography by Alessandro Ponzanelli, Daniele Testi
Lettering by Luca Barcellona
Music Consultant & Marketing by Gabriele “Gabro” Minelli
Songs: VOICES OF JAMAICA A Mixtape by Blundetto, Joya Landis (Blundedit) ‘When The Lights Are Low’, Ken Boothe ‘Mr Wind’, Gregory Isaacs ‘Reform Institute’, Blundetto dubplate with Don Camilo ‘Rocky Road’.
Starring: David Pecchi, Alessandro Ponzanelli, Oliver Parker, Ricky Brotini.

 

 

I love sharing surf films on 1X57 – check out the nearly 50 videos.

Dr. Weil’s Anti-Inflammatory Food Pyramid

Imagine this for a food pyramid – topped off by dark chocolate and red wine, dairy nowhere to be seen, and fruits/vegetables as the foundation.

 

(drweil.com)

 

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22 rules of storytelling – according to Pixar’s Emma Coats

On Twitter, Pixar storyboard artist Emma Coats has compiled nuggets of narrative wisdom she’s received working for the animation studio over the years. It’s some sage stuff, although there’s nothing here about defending yourself from your childhood toys when they inevitably come to life with murder in their hearts. A truly glaring omission.

 

#7: Come up with your ending before you figure out your middle. Seriously. Endings are hard, get yours working up front.

#13: Give your characters opinions. Passive/malleable might seem likable to you as you write, but it’s poison to the audience.

#14: Why must you tell THIS story? What’s the belief burning within you that your story feeds off of? That’s the heart of it.

#16: What are the stakes? Give us reason to root for the character. What happens if they don’t succeed? Stack the odds against.

 

Read the rest of themThe 22 rules of storytelling, according to Pixar

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Vampire bones dug up in Bulgaria

Bulgarian archaeologists are showing off two centuries-old skeletons that they say were pinned down through their chests with iron rods to keep them from turning into vampires — a trend that was all the rage in medieval Europe.

The “vampire” skeletons were excavated recently near the Black Sea town of Sozopol, according to reports from The Associated Press and AFP. Bozhidar Dimitrov, head of Bulgaria’s National History Museum, was quoted as saying that corpses were regularly treated this way in some parts of the country until the beginning of the 20th century.

About 100 similar burials have been found in Bulgaria over the years.

Bulgarian archaeologist Petar Balabanov has found a number of nailed-down skeletons near the eastern town of Debelt, at gravesites dating as far back as the 1st century. According to custom, the bodies had to be pinned down just in case they tried to rise from the grave.

via MSNBC

 

Of the many explanations for this Vampire myth, the one I found most interesting is the plague. During which thousands of people were dying with no explanation, and that sounds an awful lot like all the vampire movies!

Even the symptom of the plague, the buboes, could look like some nasty bite…

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Hybrid surgery, a major new medical trend, reduces need for cutting open

This reminds me of Star Trek as we discover new ways to heal patients without cutting them open. This method involves half-surgery and half-minimally-invasive techniques that also take much less time:

They performed a unique, high-risk hybrid procedure that combined minimally-invasive method with traditional surgical techniques. They stopped the massive balloon-like aneurysm, replaced a failed heart valve, repaired another valve and also closed a hole in Patricia Crawford’s heart.

Now, just a few weeks since the successful Feb. 7 procedure, Crawford is much more active and energetic, and only taking medications for her heart. Most importantly, she no longer needs a heart-lung transplant.

Such hybrid surgeries are the start of a major medical trend, said Dr. Jamil Aboulhosn, director of the Ahmanson-UCLA Adult Congenital Heart Disease Center.

“We’re able to do more for high-risk patients like Patti than ever before. We’re performing more creative procedures that blend traditional surgery and minimally-invasive techniques to help patients who previously had few or no options.”

Dr. Hillel Laks and the operating room team started with traditional surgical methods, placing her on the heart-lung machine and opening the aneurysm by her heart.

Aboulhosn then employed the hybrid intervention by using a new balloon-mounted “melody valve” to replace her failing pulmonary valve and to close the hole in her heart. These two procedures, which normally would take more than an hour to complete surgically, only took 10 minutes thanks to the less-invasive valve-replacement technique.

learn moreUCLA Today