Tag Archives: political

Twitter measures your feelings about Obama and Romney – Twitter Political Index

One glance at the numbers, and it’s easy to see why pundits are already calling 2012 “the Twitter election.” More Tweets are sent every two days today than had ever been sent prior to Election Day 2008 — and Election Day 2008’s Tweet volume represents only about six minutes of Tweets today.

All this explosive growth in conversation has fueled Twitter as a platform for civic debate and created a massive data set for analysis.

Today, we’re launching the Twitter Political Index, a daily measurement of Twitter users’ feelings towards the candidates as expressed in nearly two million Tweets each week.

Each day, the Index evaluates and weighs the sentiment of Tweets mentioning Obama or Romney relative to the more than 400 million Tweets sent on all other topics.

The trend in Twitter Political Index scores for President Obama over the last two years often parallel his approval ratings from Gallup, frequently even hinting at where the poll numbers are headed.

 

More on this: Twitter Blog - A new barometer for the election

 

 

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Why Amsterdam, Copenhagen are bike friendly cities

“The bicycle was regarded, more than most places in the world — as ‘good for society,’” he writes in an email. “After the bicycle boom in the late 1800s, many cycling clubs merged and then many of them merged again, morphing into cyclist ‘unions’, with political goals. What happened in most countries in the early 20th century was that sports cycling organizations were formed to further cycling as sport…. Not so in Denmark and the Netherlands. The cyclist unions — meaning organizations for promoting cycling as transport, etc. — stayed strong and separate and they gained political influence.”

Still, that didn’t stop planners from ripping out cycle tracks and starting to design streets for cars as Europe modernized in the wake of World War II. By the early 1960s, much of the cycling infrastructure that had existed in the pre-war era was gone, and the percentage of the population using bicycles for transportation fell to an all-time low of 10 percent.

Then history intervened. “The energy crisis in 1973 hit Denmark hard. Very hard,” writes Colville-Andersen. “Car-free Sundays were introduced in order to save fuel. Every second streetlight was turned off in order to save energy. A groundswell of public discontent started to form. People wanted to be able to ride their bicycles again — safely. Protests took place…. The energy crisis faded, but then returned in 1979. More protests. One form of protest/awareness was painting white crosses on the asphalt where cyclists had been killed. This time, things happened. We started to rebuild our cycle track network in the early 1980s. Fatalities and injuries started falling. The network was expanded.

learn more about bikes in each city, and a video, atThe Atlantic Cities

 

// Photo – Moyan_brenn

Netflix goes to Washington D.C. – forms PAC

In yet another move to boost its Washington profile, Netflix has formed a political action committee (PAC), new federal records indicate.

Called FLIXPAC, the committee may now make contributions donations directly to federal candidates — up to $5,000 per election.

And it provides Netflix with another political tool with which to aggressively press a pro-intellectual property, anti-video piracy agenda — an effort it began in earnest in 2010, when the company began heavily investing in federal lobbying efforts.

In 2009, for example, Netflix spent just $20,000 on federal lobbying, congressional records show. But that figure grew to $130,000 in 2010 and $500,000 in 2011.

via Politico

 

// Photo via Mr. Thomas

I think I'm a Classical Liberal (and not a Libertarian)

Classical liberalism is the philosophy committed to the ideal of limited government, constitutionalism, rule of law, due process, and liberty of individuals including freedom of religion, speech, press, assembly, and free markets.

Classical liberalism developed in the 19th century in Europe and the United States. Although classical liberalism built on ideas that had already developed by the end of the 18th century, it advocated a specific kind of society, government and public policy as a response to the Industrial Revolution and urbanization. Notable individuals who have contributed to classical liberalism include Jean-Baptiste Say, Thomas Malthus and David Ricardo. It drew on the economics of Adam Smith and on a belief in natural law, utilitarianism, and progress.

via Wikipedia

Not to be confused with Libertariansim, which varies by definition, but generally is a modern thought. Not me, I like the old school social theory from the eve of the Industrial Revolution. Simple things like the rule of law, freedom of religion, a constitution…appeal to me.

Weird how it’s the classical nature of the thinking that strikes me because I live in country that practices Social Liberalism. Which is nearly the same thing but includes the element of social justice, “in that it believes the legitimate role of the state includes addressing economic and social issues such as unemployment, health care, and education while simultaneously expanding civil rights.”

Not sure where I fall on that. At times the state does need to step in and force things, but overall I would prefer the community handle things by itself.

Which means, yep, I’m a classical liberal!

I think I’m a Classical Liberal (and not a Libertarian)

Classical liberalism is the philosophy committed to the ideal of limited government, constitutionalism, rule of law, due process, and liberty of individuals including freedom of religion, speech, press, assembly, and free markets.

Classical liberalism developed in the 19th century in Europe and the United States. Although classical liberalism built on ideas that had already developed by the end of the 18th century, it advocated a specific kind of society, government and public policy as a response to the Industrial Revolution and urbanization. Notable individuals who have contributed to classical liberalism include Jean-Baptiste Say, Thomas Malthus and David Ricardo. It drew on the economics of Adam Smith and on a belief in natural law, utilitarianism, and progress.

via Wikipedia

Not to be confused with Libertariansim, which varies by definition, but generally is a modern thought. Not me, I like the old school social theory from the eve of the Industrial Revolution. Simple things like the rule of law, freedom of religion, a constitution…appeal to me.

Weird how it’s the classical nature of the thinking that strikes me because I live in country that practices Social Liberalism. Which is nearly the same thing but includes the element of social justice, “in that it believes the legitimate role of the state includes addressing economic and social issues such as unemployment, health care, and education while simultaneously expanding civil rights.”

Not sure where I fall on that. At times the state does need to step in and force things, but overall I would prefer the community handle things by itself.

Which means, yep, I’m a classical liberal!

The Top Political Videos of 2011 – over 50 million views

The top video by far is a young man defending gay marriage (#1) and the White House Correspondent’s Dinner videos are the funniest (#2, #6).

The Republican campaign videos (#3, #7, #9) are funny or serious depending on where you sit.

And, the best news of all, tens of millions of people are watching politics and even real events, like Osama bin Laden’s death (#4).

  1. Zach Wahls speaks about family [defending gay marriage] – 15.99 million
  2. President Obama at the 2011 White House Correspondents’ Dinner - 9.18 million
  3. Strong [Rick Perry ad] – 7.15 million
  4. President Obama on death of Osama bin Laden - 6.25 million
  5. Brother, can you spare a trillion? Government gone wild! - 5.01 million
  6. Seth Meyers remarks at the 2011 White House Correspondents’ Dinner - 2.58 million
  7. Rick Perry – Proven Leadership - 2.13 million
  8. Jon Stewart Goes Head-to-Head Bill O’Reilly - 1.9 million
  9. Now is the time for action! [Herman Cain ad] – 1.74 million
  10. President Barack Obama’s First Ad of 2012 [NRSC Ad] – 1.68 million

via YouTube Trends

Very Wise: A Political Statement, of Sorts

I found this from one of my favorite leaders and her blog the Recovering Fed:

“…I have over the years developed a very small brand as a senior government executive who really believes in social media and the need to reconceptualize the concept of work. And let me tell you…I really believe in the transformative power of what these technologies achieve, which is effective connectivity between people, effective enough to let people self-organize to do important things together…”

“My essential political/philosophical conviction is belief/faith/trust that human society still has a lot of upside potential–so in that respect I call myself progressive. I tire very quickly of individuals who have a kneejerk reaction against any new idea. My bias definitely is to be much more tolerant of individuals who are enthusiastic about the new.”

Sage words that I def agree with.

Podcasts Are Saving My Life

I’m such a huge fan of podcasts that it’s insane. See I have this eye problem that prevents me from reading too much. My day job is in technology and my hobby is writing so I have no ‘good eyes’ left for everything else.

That’s where podcasts come in. I can listen to them while walking, cleaning, and building (my three other hobbies). It’s such a perfect blend that I want to share with you my favorites:

  • This Week in Tech
  • Slate Political Gabfest
  • Bloomberg Presents Lewis Lapham
  • History of Rome
  • Melvyn Bragg – In Our Time
  • The Economist (all of the shows)
  • APM: Marketplace Morning Report

The interesting thing about these shows are that none of them are from traditional TV/Radio. Half of them are writers of print media talking about their work. An interesting trend I expect to scare the beejeesus out of Hollywood.

Here are my second tier shows that I still listen to vehemently:

  • Slate Cultural Gabfest
  • Slate Hang Up And Listen
  • Dan Carlin’s Hardcore History
  • Tech News Today
  • Buzz Out Loud
  • TED Talks
  • NBC Meet The Press
  • APM: Marketplace
  • APM: The Splendid Table

Sorry for the lack of links but you can Google (or iTunes search) these titles and I guarantee you will find them.

Do you listen to any of these?