Tag Archives: gallup

Twitter measures your feelings about Obama and Romney – Twitter Political Index

One glance at the numbers, and it’s easy to see why pundits are already calling 2012 “the Twitter election.” More Tweets are sent every two days today than had ever been sent prior to Election Day 2008 — and Election Day 2008’s Tweet volume represents only about six minutes of Tweets today.

All this explosive growth in conversation has fueled Twitter as a platform for civic debate and created a massive data set for analysis.

Today, we’re launching the Twitter Political Index, a daily measurement of Twitter users’ feelings towards the candidates as expressed in nearly two million Tweets each week.

Each day, the Index evaluates and weighs the sentiment of Tweets mentioning Obama or Romney relative to the more than 400 million Tweets sent on all other topics.

The trend in Twitter Political Index scores for President Obama over the last two years often parallel his approval ratings from Gallup, frequently even hinting at where the poll numbers are headed.

 

More on this: Twitter Blog - A new barometer for the election

 

 

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U.S. unemployment drops to 8.0% – Gallup reports, May 2012

U.S. unemployment, as measured by Gallup without seasonal adjustment, dropped to 8.0% in May, a new low since Gallup began measuring employment in 2010, and more than a full percentage-point decline from May 2011. Gallup’s seasonally adjusted number for May is 8.3%, down from 8.6% in April. However, that remains higher than the seasonally adjusted low of 7.9% recorded in January 2012.

Despite recent drops in unemployment reported by Gallup and the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the U.S. employment situation remains fragile.

 

Fragile…or, rocky as seen in the graph above where the numbers have been rising/falling since January 2012.

Tomorrow the U.S. government’s will publish its own unemployment numbers form the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

 

// Thx – Flap’s Blog

Momentum continues – NAACP endorses same-sex marriage

In a move that some called historic, the country’s oldest African American civil rights group voted Saturday to endorse same-sex marriage…saying it opposed any policy or legislative initiative that “seeks to codify discrimination or hatred into the law or to remove the constitutional rights of LGBT citizens.”

The vote marks a national turning point on the issue of gay marriage. President Obama announced this month that he supports gay marriage. A Gallup Poll last year found, for the first time in the poll’s history, that a majority of Americans supported the legalization of gay marriage, 53% to 45%.

“Civil marriage is a civil right and a matter of civil law,” Benjamin Todd Jealous, president and CEO of the 103-year-old NAACP said in a statement.

“The NAACP’s support for marriage equality is deeply rooted in the 14th Amendment of the United States Constitution and equal protection of all people.”

Still, it may be a long time before the entire community joins in support.

Many African Americans oppose same-sex marriage…

***

read the full article - learn how African Americans are key voters in discriminatory laws – L.A. Times

Do American think nuclear power is safe, even after Fukushima? …Yes

 Despite concerns about a possible nuclear disaster in the U.S.,

58% of Americans think nuclear power plants in the U.S. are safe, while 36% say they are not.

Nuclear power remains very much in the news as workers in Japan continue efforts to contain the disastrous impact of the March 11 earthquake and tsunami on nuclear power plants along that country’s northern coast.

In a survey conducted just days later, Gallup found 7 in 10 Americans saying that as a result of the events in Japan, they were more concerned about a nuclear disaster occurring in the U.S.

Still, a March 25-27 Gallup survey shows that a clear majority of Americans believe nuclear plants in the U.S. are safe.

via Gallup

 

Here is a follow-up post that shows 14 near meltdowns in 2010 and 56 serious violations from 2007-2011, and yet Congress and the public were told that “all is well.”

Top 4 ways Americans lose weight – exercise, eat less, portion control, & natural foods

Trying to lose weight is something most Americans can identify with. Two-thirds say they have made a serious effort to lose weight at least once in their life, including 25% saying they tried once or twice, 30% trying between 3 and 10 times, and 8% trying more than 10 times.

The 52% of all U.S. adults who say they have succeeded at losing weight at some point in their lives were more likely to credit dietary changes than exercise.

The top three diet-related tactics Americans said they used were eating less, counting calories/portion control, and eating more natural foods. In terms of those who relied on exercise, just working out in general was the most frequently mentioned form of activity.

Working out/exercising is the dominant exercise-related response, but 5% specifically credit walking and 3% running or jogging.

via Gallup and Thrive

And, what are the most effective strategies for those losing weight?

31% – Worked out/exercised
23% - Ate Less/Dieted
12% – Counted calories/portion control
10% – Ate more natural foods

While I respect all of these methods, especially portion control, I have to wonder when “natural foods” will make it higher on the list?

To me it is the most important factor in weight gain/loss at it is the fuel you put in your body. It provides the energy to exercise, the desire to eat less, and the improved health that supports long-term weight loss.

Top 4 ways Americans lose weight – exercise, eat less, portion control, & natural foods

Trying to lose weight is something most Americans can identify with. Two-thirds say they have made a serious effort to lose weight at least once in their life, including 25% saying they tried once or twice, 30% trying between 3 and 10 times, and 8% trying more than 10 times.

The 52% of all U.S. adults who say they have succeeded at losing weight at some point in their lives were more likely to credit dietary changes than exercise.

The top three diet-related tactics Americans said they used were eating less, counting calories/portion control, and eating more natural foods. In terms of those who relied on exercise, just working out in general was the most frequently mentioned form of activity.

Working out/exercising is the dominant exercise-related response, but 5% specifically credit walking and 3% running or jogging.

via Gallup and Thrive

And, what are the most effective strategies for those losing weight?

31% – Worked out/exercised
23% - Ate Less/Dieted
12% – Counted calories/portion control
10% – Ate more natural foods

While I respect all of these methods, especially portion control, I have to wonder when “natural foods” will make it higher on the list?

To me it is the most important factor in weight gain/loss at it is the fuel you put in your body. It provides the energy to exercise, the desire to eat less, and the improved health that supports long-term weight loss.

What's your ideal weight? I bet in 1991 it was 10 pounds less (chart)

The latest Gallup poll on weight is scary. In the last twenty years our standards for weight have changed. We actually believe we need to be larger.

Of course, this could be due to us all getting taller, moving away from skinny as ideal, or the obvious obesity epidemic. The latter is most likely true.

If you put these average weights into the CDC’s body mass index calculator, then our averages are way overweight, borderline obese.

The graph doesn’t show a downward trend…

Gallup

What’s your ideal weight? I bet in 1991 it was 10 pounds less (chart)

The latest Gallup poll on weight is scary. In the last twenty years our standards for weight have changed. We actually believe we need to be larger.

Of course, this could be due to us all getting taller, moving away from skinny as ideal, or the obvious obesity epidemic. The latter is most likely true.

If you put these average weights into the CDC’s body mass index calculator, then our averages are way overweight, borderline obese.

The graph doesn’t show a downward trend…

Gallup