Tag Archives: orange

Fall is coming

I can feel it coming like the light rain before the storm. The temperature is dropping and the kids are back in school. Tourist season is over, no more vacations, and everyone is back at home focused on work. That is until Saturday and Sunday when the raging obsession that is football begins. These are the signs of fall.

Leaves will soon drop and the trees will become ghastly versions of themselves. Rain and mud will replace the heat and sunshine. Our memories of the summer will become stories we enchant, or bore, our friends with. Our fondness for them grows even as we wish away the sweltering summer heat.

Do you like to sweat? Or are you one of those that prefers the cold. Those big jackets and high boots. Hats and handbags, layers upon layers in the sharpest of colors. Even though black and gray always dominate, there is some room for the orange and red of fall. It must be the fashionistas favorite time of year striding down a blustery city street as if it’s the fashion runway in Milan.

Most certainly someone will tell you, fall is my favorite season of the year. Which always causes me to wonder what do you think about Autumn, and why does it have to be fall. I ask such silly questions because I can never make up my mind, is fall better than summer? I know it’s better than spring, for that matter spring is on par with winter. There is just too much waiting in the both of them. I prefer the non-stop action of both summer and fall, but can never name my favorite.

Perhaps because it reminds me of the setting sun. When the sky turns orange and red before dropping its leaves. We all love to see it, but it heralds the end of the day and I never liked endings. It’s the moment I want to get captured in. So I rush to enjoy these last days of summer. Complaining about the heat while quietly wishing it would go away. Enjoying football and the fond embrace of jackets. I get lost in the waning days of summer and feel the cold breezes and think, fall is coming.

 

The first day of fall is September 22, 2012.

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Brown widow spiders aggressively populating Southern California – pushing aside black widows

A poisonous spider is aggressively colonizing Southern California.

Panic.

Now, take a deep breath: The spread of brown widows could actually be good thing.

Newly released research suggests nonnative brown widows are pushing out more dangerous (and native) western black widows. Most of the time, brown widows have a bite similar to that of common household spiders, producing only a red mark and slight pain, according to the Center for Invasive Species Research at UC Riverside.

“The most common thing, anecdotally, that homeowners are saying is, ‘I used to have 3 or 4 black widows and now I have 10 to 15 brown widows,’” said Richard Vetter, a retired researcher at UC Riverside and lead author of a recent study about the interaction between the arachnids.

 

Learn more: U-T San Diego - Brown widows crawl across SoCal sprawl

 

 

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Jacques Pépin crêpes – simple ones in seconds, plus an orange soufflé crêpe

My favorite chef is at it again, this time showing us how easy crêpes are to make. Simple ingredients and in a few minutes you have a great dessert or lunch snack.

 

 

Transcript of the recipe:

  • Melt some butter in a skillet.
  • While it’s melting, combine flour, two eggs, a few dashes of sugar, dash a salt, and a quarter of a cup of milk
  • Whisk until smooth and thick. Then add enough milk to make a thin batter. Add the melted butter.
  • In the same buttery skillet, ladle in some of the batter. Quickly turn the skillet to coat the pan with the batter.
  • Cook for about 1-minute, at least, on one side. When you see it is golden, flip it over to cook for a little bit longer. Remove from pan and voilà.

 

This is only the first of four recipes on the show. Keep watching to see them make Orange Soufflé CrêpesBaked Alaska, and Apricot and Pistachio Soufflé.

It’s amazing what you can do with egg whites!

Modern Royals – Rainbow Queen in the British Vogue

Note that it says the Queen prefers:

  • 29% – blue
  • 13% – floral
  • 11% – cream or green
  • 10% – pink or purple
  • 4%  - red, orange, or yellow
  • 2%  - black
  • 1%  - checkered or beige

And, some close-ups.

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Where’s the coldest surf spot in Orange County?

Surfing in Southern California means you hang out in water normally 55-65 degrees. Pretty cold and worth a wetsuit most of the time. Every once in a while the wind gets going and blows away the entire surface of the ocean, revealing the frigid lower layer. As that current comes up (upwelling) the water drops drastically, like 10 degrees or more.

It happened once last summer, in the middle of August. The water went from 65 to 50 overnight. I couldn’t believe it and, of course, nobody was in the water. Except for me, that is, I put on some booties and enjoyed the least crowded day all summer.

It turns out that these upwellings happen an awful lot in one particular spot.

 

 

So where’s the coldest surf spot in Orange County?

Blackies in Newport seems to be, thanks to the Newport Submarine Canyon trenched just offshore…. which explains why a wind/ water upwelling event like we had yesterday Sunday March 18, 2012, with 25-40 knots winds for a 24 hour period, turned the water from colder to coldest, at around 50 degrees at first light this morning…. But we’re over it. Can’t we just get our normal cold water back?

via Ghetto Juice

 

Reveling in Ranunculus

Ranunculus, with their layered, crepe-like petals that explode in blooms of red, yellow, orange, white and pink, are cheery in the Fall and equally festive in the Spring. The bright beauties spread their rainbow happiness in small pots on tables, as part of larger plant containers and along the front of home borders. They are also a favorite among Spring brides.

Those available during bulb season in October and November are sold as dormant tubers, and grow into the beautiful, tall plants that make excellent cut flowers. These start their lives right here in Southern California in the famous “Flower Fields’ of Carlsbad. When planting these “bulb” varieties, known as Tecolote ranunculus, in flower beds, it’s best to place them in the middle so other plants can conceal their shaggy bases.

Flower Fields of Carlsbad, CA

In England, the common name for Ranunculus is “Buttercup,” apparently because of various legends linking it to dairy cows and butter. There’s also supposed to be a Native American myth associated with the varieties that grow in the Pacific Northwest: Coyote was tossing his eyeballs in the air for fun, and either Eagle or Buzzard swooped by and took them. So Coyote took Ranunculus to use as his new eyes. Hence, the common name in that region, “Coyote Eyes.”

via, my favorite nursery, Roger’s Gardens

 

// Photos – Kanonn, Superfem, Sakura Chihaya+, Hello-Julie