Tag Archives: chef

Huge internet celebrations for Julia Child’s 100th birthday, tomorrow Wednesday August 15

Anyone who’s seen a Julia Child cooking show loves the woman. She was so interesting and weird, over-the-top and funny, and brought so much French cooking to America. Her work inspired a generation of chefs, including bringing cadre of talented French chefs to our shores.

Today, you can find fine French food everywhere and cooking shows run like marathons. So, take some time out of your daily food watching to celebrate Julia Child’s 100th birthday. The internet is doing what it does best, organizing awesome events around obscure topics:

 

 

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Grilling corn without aluminum foil – keep the husks on

Here are 2 natural ways to cook corn, without aluminum foil. Both recommend pre-soaking the corn and keeping the husks on while grilling.

The first is from favorite chef Rick Bayless and the second, a top Google result, from What’s Cooking America:

Rick Bayless

Preliminaries.   About an hour before serving, place the ears of corn in a deep bowl, cover with cold water and weight with a plate to keep them submerged.  Light your charcoal fire and let it burn until the bed of coals is medium-hot; adjust the grill 4 inches above the fire.

Grill the corn.   Lay the corn on the grill and roast for 15 to 20 minutes, turning frequently, until the outer leaves are blackened.  Remove, let cool several minutes, then remove the husks and silk.  About 10 minutes before serving, brush the corn with melted butter, return to the grill and turn frequently until nicely browned.

Techniques. Soaking in Water, Roasting in the Husk:  The preliminary soaking keeps the outside from burning right off the bat and the inside damp enough to steam.  First roasting in the husk penetrates the corn with leafy flavor, but the step is often omitted—especially with sweet corn.

 

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Jacques Pépin crêpes – simple ones in seconds, plus an orange soufflé crêpe

My favorite chef is at it again, this time showing us how easy crêpes are to make. Simple ingredients and in a few minutes you have a great dessert or lunch snack.

 

 

Transcript of the recipe:

  • Melt some butter in a skillet.
  • While it’s melting, combine flour, two eggs, a few dashes of sugar, dash a salt, and a quarter of a cup of milk
  • Whisk until smooth and thick. Then add enough milk to make a thin batter. Add the melted butter.
  • In the same buttery skillet, ladle in some of the batter. Quickly turn the skillet to coat the pan with the batter.
  • Cook for about 1-minute, at least, on one side. When you see it is golden, flip it over to cook for a little bit longer. Remove from pan and voilà.

 

This is only the first of four recipes on the show. Keep watching to see them make Orange Soufflé CrêpesBaked Alaska, and Apricot and Pistachio Soufflé.

It’s amazing what you can do with egg whites!

Mexico awards its highest honor for foreigners to three Americans

Two San Diegans — a scholar who found fulfillment studying Mexican migrants and a refugee who built a successful spa in Baja California — are receiving Mexico’s highest honor for foreigners, it was announced Wednesday.

Wayne Cornelius, 66, a longtime professor at the University of California San Diego, was selected “for his work of more than five decades to achieve greater and better understanding of Mexico in the United States,” according to a statement by President Felipe Calderón.

Deborah Szekely, the 90-year-old founder of the internationally known Rancho La Puerta in Tecate, was praised for contributions “oriented to preserving the environmental, social and cultural heritage over the past seven decades.”

A third American recognized with the distinction — called the Order of the Aztec Eagle — is Rick Bayless, a chef who specializes in Mexican cuisine. He hosts the PBS television series “Mexico: One Plate at a Time,” which recently aired a segment on Baja California cuisine.

via U-T San Diego

 

Additionally, both Deborah Sezekely and Rick Bayless are receiving their honor, in part, due to their environmental and sustainable efforts.

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Tribute to a Legend: Jacques Pépin

We honor the culinary success of one of America’s most celebrated chefs, Jacques Pépin.

“Easily the most influential French chef to the wave of young American chefs.”

“His earliest work was all about taking the classic dishes and demystifying them, almost decoding them, and making them accessible.”

See his public access show – Essential Pépin (Episode 103 – Desserts)

Jacques Pepin Desserts – light and healthy panache, tatin, and tart

My favorite chef, Jacques Pépin, cooks up four delicious, and mostly healthy desserts:

Episode 103: Jacques helps his daughter Claudine relinquish her fear of making pastry with his easy Tartelettes Aux Fruit Panaches. She goes on to assist her father in the kitchen as he makes his variation of the very traditional French, Tarte Tatin. Jacques then shares his mother’s recipe for Mémé’s Apple Tart using an unusual method to make the pastry. Finally his granddaughter Shorey joins him to make and taste Individual Chocolate Nut Pies.

“You cannot make great food without mixing some love into it.”

My favorite is the Tartalettes Aux Fruit Panaches - Thin disks of dough baked with a topping of lightly sugared apricot and plum wedges until the pastry is crisp and the fruit soft.