Tag Archives: clothes

Recycling creates a million jobs

If you send trash directly to a landfill not much happens, but if you recycle it a series of business touch the trash and that creates jobs. Here is a report from a few years ago that shows recycling creates 25 jobs, while sending trash to the landfill only creates one job (per ton of trash). A huge economic impact and one that highlights my favorite green idea - the double impact.

I’ve always believed the key to our green future is to find ways to improve lives as we go green. It can’t just be about sacrifices and volunteering, it also needs to help people. And that is usually the way it works, it just sometimes takes a little extra time to think things through.

The recycling report, from the Institute for Local Self Reliance, also gathered data for specific items, and it’s impressive: 85 jobs for clothes recycling, 93 jobs for plastic, and 296 for computers.

Which makes recycling a valuable sector of the economy employing hundreds of thousands of people. A report from the EPA says there are “56,000 establishments that employ more than 1.1 million people, generate an annual payroll of nearly $37 billion, and gross over $236 billion in annual revenues.”

Now that is a double impact – jobs, GDP, and businesses for greening the planet.

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End of summer (free) surf film from Billabong – Daze at Sea

Every year, as the summer ends, the surf companies show off their clothes and surfers in free surf films. They are a visual delight and the soundtrack always supplies a new favorite song. Here is the first one, from Billabong – Daze at Sea – available for download in various sizes:

Small | Standard | TabletHD

 

 

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11 documentaries about cities – streaming on Netflix

Here are 11 new and new-ish documentaries now streaming that offer interesting, frustrating and downright sad stories about cities.

 

Bill Cunningham New York
2010, 84 minutes
Directed by Richard Press

A film about octogenarian and New York Times fashion photographer Bill Cunningham, who rides his bike around New York City taking pictures of clothes and the people – both ordinary and extraordinary – who wear them. A unique look at the changing fashions of one of the world’s centers of culture.

 

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Modern Royals – Rainbow Queen in the British Vogue

Note that it says the Queen prefers:

  • 29% – blue
  • 13% – floral
  • 11% – cream or green
  • 10% – pink or purple
  • 4%  - red, orange, or yellow
  • 2%  - black
  • 1%  - checkered or beige

And, some close-ups.

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Buy cool t-shirts from an online community of graphic designers, via Threadless

Threadless is an online community of artists and an e-commerce website based in Chicago, Illinois. In 2000, co-founders Jake Nickell and Jacob DeHart started the company with $1,000 of their own money.

Designs are created by and chosen by an online community. Each week, about 1,000 designs are submitted online and are put to a public vote. After seven days the staff reviews the top-scoring designs. Based on the average score and community feedback, about 10 designs are selected each week, printed on clothing and other products, and sold worldwide through the online store and at their retail store in Chicago.

Designers whose work is printed receive $2,000 in cash and $500 in Threadless gift cards, which can be exchanged for $200 cash. Each time a design is reprinted, the respective artist receives $500 cash. Threadless keeps rights to the design on clothing; designers keep the rights to their designs on all other media.

via Wikipedia

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The Steve Jobs washing machine from Miele – innovator approved!

In the biography of Steve Jobs from Walter Isaacson, a few pages are dedicated to Steve’s habits at home. One of them was the desire to discuss and research every decision to make sure it was perfect.

This happened on everything ranging from baby names to the type of washing machine they use. When they did settle on a name or product, they loved it, and that is exactly what happened with their laundry appliances.

It turns out that the Americans make washers and dryers all wrong. The Europeans make them much better – but they take twice as long to do clothes!

It turns out that they wash them with about a quarter as much water and your clothes end up with a lot less detergent on them. Most important, they don’t trash your clothes. They use a lot less soap, a lot less water, but they come out much cleaner, much softer, and they last a lot longer.

The company that Steve found was called Miele, and is similar to Apple in many ways. They care more about quality and user experience than they do about price or convention. So it’s no wonder Steve said the following about his new washer and dryers, “I got more thrill out of them than I have out of any piece of high tech in years.”

I did some research and it appears that a Honeycomb design is the key component of these washers.

This intricate design on the inside of the washing machine allows for an “80% reduction in the number of water exit holes and the skillful development of a water channel network that provides a thin water layer that actually cushions your clothes while the drum rotates.”

An independent study found that clothes washed using this method can last up to four times longer.

The washing machines start at $1,300.

Comparison of a traditional washing machine drum (left) and the honeycomb drum (right) while a towel is being washed.

Has the surf ‘look' changed? (since the 50s)

From Corky Carroll:

The other day I got a question submitted asking me if Pendleton shirts were actual surf fashion back in the late ’50s and early ’60s. As a matter of fact, they sorta were.

Pendleton Shirts

When I first started surfing in the mid-50s, there was no set “surf look” as far as I know. Surfwear was a long way off.

When the big surf fad started to take place, kicked into gear with the 1959 movie “Gidget,” there became certain pieces of attire that people related to as surfwear. Pendleton shirts were one of those. They were warm and felt good when you got out of the water, and you could use them in place of a jacket at night.

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Has the surf ‘look’ changed? (since the 50s)

From Corky Carroll:

The other day I got a question submitted asking me if Pendleton shirts were actual surf fashion back in the late ’50s and early ’60s. As a matter of fact, they sorta were.

Pendleton Shirts

When I first started surfing in the mid-50s, there was no set “surf look” as far as I know. Surfwear was a long way off.

When the big surf fad started to take place, kicked into gear with the 1959 movie “Gidget,” there became certain pieces of attire that people related to as surfwear. Pendleton shirts were one of those. They were warm and felt good when you got out of the water, and you could use them in place of a jacket at night.

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Join hundreds of local artists and designers at Unique L.A. this weekend

I’m a big builder, like Bob, and I love creating things so I’m pretty excited about Unique L.A. this weekend.

The event is the “largest independent design show in the country, attendees get the rare chance to meet and shop directly from over 325 hand-selected designers and artists.”

December 3 + 4
11 – 6pm both days
The California Market Center - 110 East Ninth Street, LA, CA 90079
$10 at the door or in advance online (Kids 12 and under are free)

The growing swell of builder events, like the Maker Faire, are hotbeds of creativity and awesome people. This one looks to be a bit heavy on female-focused crafts (purses, jewelry) but that means the mens clothes will be rad. Here is the show preview and the twitter account.

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