Tag Archives: dvd

Come Hell of High Water (trailer, DVD) – documenting the culture of bodysurfing

 

Keith Malloy’s debut film, Come Hell or High Water, shot primarily on 16mm focuses on the simplicity and beauty of bodysurfing. “It’s about taking a breath, and kicking your feet, in the big blue sea.” – Patagonia

 

The film explores the history and progression of the sport of bodysurfing and the pureness that comes from riding a wave. Shot primary in 16mm, the film takes a unique look at the culture, beauty and simplicity of the sport, capturing the stories and locations of those who belong to this community.

Winning awards in best cinematography, and best film at both The London Surf Film Fest and The Surfer Poll Awards,

Shot on location at The Wedge, Point Panic, Piha Beach, Las Escolleras, The Pipeline, Waimea Bay, Makapuu, Sandy Beach, Sandspit, Cloudbreak, Yellowstone, Mentawais, Kamakura, Teahupoo and Nantucket.

Features: Mark Cunningham , Mike Stewart, Chris Kalima, Durdam Rocherolle, Patrice Chanzy, Belinda Baggs, Crystal Thornburg-Homcy, and Dan Malloy. – Patagonia Australia

 

Buy the DVD, $25

Buy the digital version, $15, or rent $5

Read: Behind-the-scenes in New Zealand

 

 

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The end of ownership for DVDs – say goodbye to your DVD collection

I feel like this is one of those big moments that sputters into life – the end of ownership. At least, when it comes to DVDs.

This happened to music a few years back…I mean, who still thinks of owning music with CDs?

With Blu-ray sales slotted to decline in the next few years, the future is owning digital copies of movies not DVDs.

It will be interesting to see how this affects the ownership economy. So many people love their DVD collections, just as people loved their VHS collection and CD collections.

But, storing 20-30 digital movies can take up all your hard drive space, especially for high definition flicks. Whereas, keeping a few thousand songs on your computer didn’t hurt that much.

I bet there will be a race to super-size hard drives (especially on laptops) and build a business around movies in the cloud.

Like Apple is currently doing:

 

Apple adds 20th Century Fox movies to iTunes in the Cloud, all major studios now on board

Apple and Twentieth Century Fox have reportedly come to an agreement that will finally make the studio’s films available via iTunes in the Cloud. When Apple made movies a cornerstone of the cloud-based initiative (which lets customers redownload previous purchases) earlier this year, the company only had deals in place with four of the “big six” studios — Universal and Fox were the holdouts. It didn’t take long for Universal to sign on and add its films to iTunes in the Cloud, but apparently Apple needed more time to hammer out a viable solution with Fox.

Now we’re able to confirm that Twentieth Century Fox titles no longer carry a warning that they won’t be available from iTunes in the Cloud following purchase. You’re free to delete them from your PC/Mac or iOS device and redownload at will, and the same movies can also be streamed from an Apple TV.

 

Source: The Verge

 

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Netflix drops $1 million algorithm, goes all-in on streaming recommendations

 

Netflix awarded a $1 million prize to a developer team in 2009 for an algorithm that increased the accuracy of the company’s recommendation engine by 10 percent. But today it doesn’t use the million-dollar code, and has no plans to implement it in the future, Netflix announced on its blog Friday.

The post goes on to explain why: a combination of too much engineering effort for the results, and a shift from movie recommendations to the “next level” of personalization caused by the transition of the business from mailed DVDs to video streaming.

Netflix notes that it does still use two algorithms from the team that won the first Progress Prize for an 8.43 percent improvement.

via ars technica

It turns out that all the prize-winning work was perfect for DVD-by-mail where users add something to their queue and, best-case scenario, receive it the following day. But, now that instant streaming is taking over the parameters have changed. Viewers want something to watch immediately and like the option of flipping between several options.

That is why the Netflix updated all of its interfaces to show rows of movies giving you many, many options. It’s a subtle shift from finding the one movie you will love two days from now, to showing all the possible movies you might want to watch right now.

I guess that is the simplest way to put it, but if you want to know more the Netflix personalization science and engineering team, Xavier Amatriain and Justin Basilico, posted a lengthy and detailed, but interesting write-up, Beyond the 5 stars.

Tipping point – estimated 1 billion more movies in 2012 will be streamed than watched via DVD

According to research from the IHS Screen Digest, we may have finally reached the point when streaming video services have become ubiquitous enough to take over American households.

The researcher forecasts that 3.4 billion movies will be legally consumed over streaming services this year, more than double the 1.4 billion that were viewed last year over the internet. The number will also beat out DVD and Blu-ray viewership, which is estimated to come in at 2.4 billion this year — a 7.7 percent drop from 2011.

…the numbers appear to be inflated by unlimited streaming services like Netflix and Amazon Prime Instant Video. Such services accounted for 94 percent of all streaming viewership last year, according to the IHS, with only 1.3 percent coming from pay-per-use services like iTunes and others. The dominance of unlimited services explains why movie studios may not be so happy to see more and more of the market shift to streaming — the researchers say that customers paid an average of 51 cents per movie watched online compared to $4.72 for those purchased on physical media.

via The Verge

 

DVD's are hurting...

 

// Photo by Ross Catrow

Apple updates iCloud to include Movies and TV Shows – with an extra bonus

Two years ago I bought a movie, The Dark Knight, and then promptly deleted it during an iPhone backup.

I haven’t seen the movie since then, which stinks even though it was probably my mistake. That is until today when I went into the “Purchased” section of iTunes and found it ready for download in iCloud.

It looks like Apple left a few Easter eggs in the latest update:

Apple didn’t show off everything they had on Wednesday. Since the focus was on the new iPad, many new Apple TV features remained under the hood, waiting for users to download the software update and put the new engine through its paces.

Tech of the Hub’s Gabe Gagliano unearthed a particularly nice new feature: in addition to storing movies purchased through iTunes in the cloud, Apple will also back up at least some digital copies of movies that come with purchases of a DVD or Blu-ray.

“It’s just like iTunes match for music! I doubt it goes as far as iTunes music match, grabbing any movie it finds, including ripped DVDs.”

Apple calls this the “iTunes Digital Copy,” program; it’s been around for a while, and according to Apple, “most of the movies you buy on DVD and Blu-ray now include bonus iTunes Digital Copy discs.”

more details – Epicenter

 

Cloud storage of my movies would be so nice. Maybe I can finally get rid of all these extra hard drives and storage devices…