Tag Archives: prime

The first university-run channel on YouTube – original content just got smarter

On March 1, University of California Television (UCTV) will launch a new YouTube original channel, UCTV Prime, the first university-run channel to be included among YouTube’s new production partnerships with such recognizable brands as the Wall Street Journal, Madonna and TED.

Each week, UCTV Prime will debut 15 minutes of fresh content.

The channel’s inaugural effort, the first installment of a four-part documentary mini-series called “Naked Art,” which explores UC’s preeminent art collections.

via UCLA Today

Reflections on the diverse definitions, purposes and modes of public art from UC campuses and elsewhere, including comments by artists, curators, students and other participants.

 

The featured playlists so far are:

  • Science
  • Health/Medicine
  • Explorations in Art
  • Election Analysis
  • Research Developments

Watch more at www.youtube.com/uctvprime and www.uctv.tv/prime.

Tipping point – estimated 1 billion more movies in 2012 will be streamed than watched via DVD

According to research from the IHS Screen Digest, we may have finally reached the point when streaming video services have become ubiquitous enough to take over American households.

The researcher forecasts that 3.4 billion movies will be legally consumed over streaming services this year, more than double the 1.4 billion that were viewed last year over the internet. The number will also beat out DVD and Blu-ray viewership, which is estimated to come in at 2.4 billion this year — a 7.7 percent drop from 2011.

…the numbers appear to be inflated by unlimited streaming services like Netflix and Amazon Prime Instant Video. Such services accounted for 94 percent of all streaming viewership last year, according to the IHS, with only 1.3 percent coming from pay-per-use services like iTunes and others. The dominance of unlimited services explains why movie studios may not be so happy to see more and more of the market shift to streaming — the researchers say that customers paid an average of 51 cents per movie watched online compared to $4.72 for those purchased on physical media.

via The Verge

 

DVD's are hurting...

 

// Photo by Ross Catrow

Killing It in Prime Time: An Interview With Jane Fonda

Jane Fonda as Barbarella

You can call Jane Fonda many things, but boring, she is not.

From her role as sci-fi sex goddess, Barbarella (which I’ve never seen, but only know about through photos) in the 1960s, to the controversial Vietnam political advocate in the 1970s, to the queen of workout video in the 80s (my mom had these – as a little kid, I loved dressing up in the leotards, sweatbands and leg-warmers and dancing along) to the consummate companion of Ted Turner in the 90s – her life has been one of constant evolution.

Now as author and spokesperson for people living out the “third acts” of their lives (which she calls “Prime Time“), it was inspiring to watch her recently on Charlie Rose, talking about life as a stair-cased ascension, instead of a curved archway that peaks at middle-age, then declines. In our youth-obsessed culture, she is an example that life doesn’t end at 40. In fact, she says she really didn’t start to ‘get life’ until she hit 59 (she’s 73), which for her has meant battling depression, becoming present in her children’s lives, and creating an intimate relationship with a man (which she never achieved in her previous 3 marriages), to name a few.

Her ability to find closure in areas of her life that have plagued her seems especially key to the constant elevation and improvement she describes. When discussing her relationship with her father, she articulated what so many people fear:

“Watching him die taught me that I wasn’t afraid of death. What I’m really scared of is getting to the end of life with a lot of regrets when it’s too late to do anything about it.”

And it reminded me of the Dylan Thomas poem that is a call to arms for individuals of any age:

Do not go gentle into that good night,

Old age should burn and rave at close of day;

Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

Though wise men at their end know dark is right,

Because their words had forked no lightning they

Do not go gentle into that good night.

Good men, the last wave by, crying how bright

Their frail deeds might have danced in a green bay,

Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

Wild men who caught and sang the sun in flight,

And learn, too late, they grieved it on its way,

Do not go gentle into that good night.

Grave men, near death, who see with blinding sight

Blind eyes could blaze like meteors and be gay, 

Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

And you, my father, there on the sad height,

Curse, bless, me now with your fierce tears, I pray.

Do not go gentle into that good night.

Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

Amazon Prime TV to battle Netflix

Do you order a lot from Amazon?

Do you also watch streaming Netflix?

If so, then you are the unlikely target of Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos.

On Wednesday, he posted a memo on Amazon’s homepage asking you to pay $79 to get unlimited two-day shipping and access to over 1,000 movies and TV shows. It’s a strange combination, I know.

But, maybe this is the ideal customer…

I do order a lot from Amazon and I love Netflix, so the offer was pretty tempting. After all it is only $8/month, matching what Netflix costs, without the S&H bonus, haha.

This subtle push by Amazon to enter the TV/Movie market could be considered a smart move. The cable industry is one of the largest in America with advertising revenue alone at $27 billion. If you add in subscriber revenue the grand total is $94 billion (source NCTA, Dec 2010).

That’s a heavy market, but right now Netflix is the “big dog” and they are following Apple’s iTunes playbook for industry domination:

Back in 2003, Steve Jobs opened up the iTunes store with a few music companies signed on and hoped for the best. Fast forward to today and the store has sold over 10 billion songs and brought in $1.4 billion in the last quarter (Q2 2011). It was a tricky path to success involving some cloak and dagger on Apple’s part. Offering the struggling music companies a new revenue source, while keeping the offerings limited enough to fend off any fears of lost CD sales.

Netflix is now in a similar position offering the studios a new revenue source in a time of need (falling DVD sales). Only putting online what they can and patiently adding more over the months. CEO, Reed Hastings, has even gone on record as saying that they are not competing for TV subscribers (the equivalent of CD sales for the cable industry).

Sounds awfully familiar…and everybody knows this is happening, but no one will talk about it.

Janko Roettgers (Twitter), my new favorite author, discusses this in his piece: Who are we kidding? Of course it’s Netflix vs. cable.

Ask Netflix about cord cutting…“It’s not happening, it’s not anything we are causing, cable and Netflix are complementary.”…Cable and Netflix are competing for the same eyeballs, the same money…

We are at the point of no return. Blink an eye and Netflix is on top pulling in billions. Perhaps, that is why Amazon wants in…I just wonder if this free shipping gimmick will work.

Amazon has been known to make major off-beat investments, but even this seems weird.

Still, I am very close to signing up, so maybe it is working…