Tag Archives: tv show

Amazing (gross) limited edition – Walking Dead Season 2

 

The Walking Dead: The Complete Second Season

Having trouble waiting until October to get your zombie suspense fix? Pick up The Walking Dead: The Complete Second Season ($70) on Blu-ray. This limited edition set includes all 13 episodes from the second season, as well as audio commentaries, webisodes, deleted scenes, over 10 new featurettes, all spread across fours discs, that come encased in a fittingly gross zombie-with-a-screwdriver-in-his-eye statue.

 

ViaUncrate

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Rick Steves episode diary – filming in Venice – an enchanting behind-the-scenes

We’re nearly finished filming two new TV shows on Venice. Thinking back over a very productive day, I realize how much I love this work. Our scripts are about 3,400 words per half-hour show. They are split between “on-cameras,” with me talking directly to the camera, and “B-roll,” where we “cover the script” with footage that illustrates what we’re describing. While it’s been called “shooting the nouns,” we think of B-roll as more than that.

***

We started early, on St. Mark’s Square. While it’s littered with kitschy souvenir carts and jammed with tour groups most of the day, at 7:30, there is no tourism. The square is clean, with just a few well-dressed businesspeople walking to work, the random jogger, and very focused photographers like us marveling at how the history pops with the architecture and without the modern tourism. The Gothic is so lacy, and the Renaissance so capable. We got a few “walk-bys” to establish me in what looks like a pure, computer-generated Venetian cityscape.

 

Venice’s St. Mark’s Square before the crowds hit.

 

At 8:30, we met our local guide, Michael, who has been instrumental in setting things up in advance for us. He is brilliantly navigating the Byzantine bureaucracy of the city and helping us open all the right doors — some of them literally pillaged from Byzantium.

We climbed the Torre dell’Orologio, or Clock Tower. This was built 500 years ago, providing the city with…

keep readingJust Another Workday — in Venice

Apple updates iCloud to include Movies and TV Shows – with an extra bonus

Two years ago I bought a movie, The Dark Knight, and then promptly deleted it during an iPhone backup.

I haven’t seen the movie since then, which stinks even though it was probably my mistake. That is until today when I went into the “Purchased” section of iTunes and found it ready for download in iCloud.

It looks like Apple left a few Easter eggs in the latest update:

Apple didn’t show off everything they had on Wednesday. Since the focus was on the new iPad, many new Apple TV features remained under the hood, waiting for users to download the software update and put the new engine through its paces.

Tech of the Hub’s Gabe Gagliano unearthed a particularly nice new feature: in addition to storing movies purchased through iTunes in the cloud, Apple will also back up at least some digital copies of movies that come with purchases of a DVD or Blu-ray.

“It’s just like iTunes match for music! I doubt it goes as far as iTunes music match, grabbing any movie it finds, including ripped DVDs.”

Apple calls this the “iTunes Digital Copy,” program; it’s been around for a while, and according to Apple, “most of the movies you buy on DVD and Blu-ray now include bonus iTunes Digital Copy discs.”

more details – Epicenter

 

Cloud storage of my movies would be so nice. Maybe I can finally get rid of all these extra hard drives and storage devices…

Netflix turns to TV shows after the movie industry tries to bully the company

Netflix is now primarily an Internet streaming service for television shows, not feature films.

TV series now account for more than half of all Netflix viewing. That helps to explain why this Wednesday (Feb 29, 2012) — the long-awaited moment when motion picture classics like “Scarface” and newer hits like “Toy Story 3” will vanish from the streaming service — is not the doomsday that it was once expected to be.

The vanishing films are from Starz. Its three-and-a-half-year-old deal helped Netflix persuade millions of people to sign up for Internet streaming.

It became clear about a year ago that the deal would not be renewed. By then, though, Netflix was bulking up on old TV episodes.

Analysts say the prioritizing of television partly explains why the company has been able to retain about 21.7 million streaming subscribers in the United States — totaling one in four households that have broadband.

Many of the new titles are full seasons of TV series like “Mad Men,” “Breaking Bad” and “Lost” that Netflix executives call “26-hour movies.”

Netflix is sensitive to that criticism — but says it doesn’t really matter. As long as its algorithms serve up something worth watching, even if it’s not the subscriber’s first choice, he or she will continue paying for and enjoying the service, the company believes.

via Brian Stelter – NY Times