The Knife Maker – maturing a skill into an art

In our second film, we meet writer turned knife maker Joel Bukiewicz of Cut Brooklyn 다운로드. He talks about the human element of craft, and the potential for a skill to mature into an art. And in sharing his story, he alights on the real meaning of handmade—a movement whose riches are measured in people, not cash 다운로드.

via Made by Hand

 

“It takes buckets of blood, sweat, and work…to get competent, then maybe you have it in you to get good, to go beyond and become an artist.”

 

director-producer – KEEF
director of photography – JOSHUA KRASZEWSKI
editor – MATT SHAPIRO
music – MICHAEL TRAINOR & NATHAN ROSENBERG
music produced at THE DOG HOUSE NYC
sound recordist – ROBERT ALBRECHT
re-recording mixer – NICHOLAS MONTGOMERY
assistant re-recording mixer – JOHN GUMAER
gaffer – ADAM ORELLANA
title design – MANDY BROWN

special thanks – JOEL BUKIEWICZ & CUT BROOKLYN

Watch film #1 – The Distiller

 

A project from bureauofcommongoods.com, Made by Hand is a new short film series celebrating the people who make things by hand—sustainably, locally, and with a love for their craft 다운로드.

Now is the easiest time since Prohibition to start a distillery

In our inaugural film, we visit the Breuckelen Distilling Company, the first gin distiller in Brooklyn since prohibition 다운로드. Founder Brad Estabrooke talks about starting from nothing and the imperfect process of perfecting a craft.

“It was challenging to get people to take me seriously 다운로드. ‘Hey, I just got laid-off from my job and I have a little bit of money. I want to start a distillery.”

 

DIRECTED AND PRODUCED BY – Keith “keef” Ehrlich

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY – Joshua Kraszewski

EDITOR – Matt Shapiro

TITLE DESIGN – Mandy Brown

MUSIC – Roman Zeitlin

SOUND RECORDIST – Robert Albrecht

RE-RECORDING MIXER – Nicholas Montgomery

SPECIAL THANK – Brad Estabrooke, Breuckelen Distilling Co 다운로드.

 

Made by Hand – films to promote that which is made locally, sustainably, and with a love for craft 다운로드.

Unemployment rate normal for college grads – so why Occupy Wall Street?

For some reason I thought that not having a chance to get ahead was a big part of Occupy Wall Street. That the top 1% is running away with money from the bottom 99% 다운로드.

Unfortunately, the unemployment data below confuses that story. It shows a serious education issue and major problems in the African-American community, but not a widespread problem among the 99% 다운로드.

In fact, if you take those groups out of the equation then the problems are nearly wiped away. Our college grads have an employment rate of 4.2% 다운로드. The white and asian communities over-all have an unemployment rate around 6.5%.

An unemployment rate of 4-6% is considered normal for a healthy economy, taking into account those between jobs, career changes, etc 고독한 미식가.

Perhaps, the message for Occupy Wall Street should have been to get more kids through college and help out the African-American community?

November 2011,  Unemployment Statistics – Bureau of Labor Statistics

By Education

  • High school dropouts – 12.7%
  • High school, no college – 8.4%
  • Some college or Associates Degree – 7.4%
  • Bachelor’s and higher – 4.2%

 

By Race, Sex

White, unemployment rate, 7.2 %

  • Men – 6.8%
  • Women – 6.5%
  • Teens – 21%

Black, unemployment rate, 14.9%

  • Men – 15.5 %
  • Women – 12.7%
  • Teens – 39%

Asian, unemployment rate, 6.5%

 

By Industry

Highest unemployment rate:

  • Agriculture – 14.9%
  • Construction – 13.1%
  • Leisure and Hospitality – 11.1%

Lowest unemployment rate:

  • Self-employed – 5.2%
  • Education and Health – 5.2%
  • Government workers – 4.5%

Industry most likely for college grads:

  • Professional and business services – 9%
  • Information – 7.4%
  • Financial activities – 6.1%

I want to encourage you to come to your own conclusions about these numbers 프란시스하 다운로드. What did you come up with?

One I came up with is that it certainly pays to be a college grad (4.2%) and be self-employed (5.2%) 다운로드. Both have the lowest unemployment rates.

Labor Stats on Labor Day

In honor of Labor Day I visited a favorite government website, the Occupational Outlook Handbook 스케치업 2016 32비트 다운로드.

The handbook covers every career in America and discusses interesting things, like day-in-the-life, growth potential, education needed, salary ranges. 

For a young whippersnapper it was perfect Openssh windows download. I would browse everything from doctor to trash man to college professor.

Today, I found several images that reflect interesting labor trends in America 다운로드. Here they are, enjoy, and Happy Labor Day!
 

Ethnicity

 

80%+ of the work force is White, while persons of Hispanic origin are projected to increase, by 2018, their share of the labor force from 14.3 percent to 17.6 percent 다운로드.

 

 

 Age

 

Largest group of the workforce, 23.3%, are those age 45-54, followed closely by those aged 35-44, 22.7% 로미오와 줄리엣.

 

 

 New Jobs

 

Most new jobs in America are projected to come from healthcare and scientific/technical professions 다운로드.

 

 

Fastest Growing Jobs


 

Largest Group of New Jobs

 

Clearly, thousands of jobs, nearly all the jobs, will be healthcare 다운로드.

 

 

Fastest Decline

 

Bye, bye manufacturing… 다운로드.

 

 

Education

 

Get an associate’s after high school, or a master’s after undergrad and you will be much better off onekey ghost.

 

 

Good Producing Jobs

 

We don’t produce goods anymore, just houses 영화 간첩 다운로드.

 

 

Change in Employment

 

We are definitely becoming more of a service society…not sure that is a good thing.