Tag Archives: labor

Historical film from 1947 – How a book is made (an unbelievable amount of labor!)

How about a book? Find out, 1947-style! We must say, despite the labor-intensive type-setting process, they make the publishing process look easy – Paris Review

 

 

Back before inkjets, printing was a time-comsuming laborious process, that took teams of people working together to produce just one book. Now days, any crabby person can sit at home and crank out stuff on a blog or even make internet video. This movie will make you happy as you watch others toil for ‘The Man’ under primitive conditions.

Unemployment rate at 8.1% – job growth seen in manufacturing, architecture, engineering, and computers

Hiring continued its slow pace in April as employers added a modest 115,000 jobs to their payrolls.

The jobless rate inched down to 8.1% last month, the Labor Department said Friday, but that wasn’t because more people were employed. Rather, the rate fell as more workers dropped out of the labor force (about 342,000 workers).

The April jobs report was highly anticipated because job growth slowed sharply in March after three strong winter months of payroll gains averaging 252,000.

Job growth last month was bolstered by continued strength in manufacturing, which added 16,000 jobs to payrolls, and professional services such as architecture, engineering and computer systems design also increased staffing.

Wages overall were subdued; average earnings for all private-sector employees went up by a mere penny from March, to $23.38 an hour.

via LA Times

LA Light – the electric radiance of Los Angeles at night

I sought out to capture the electric radiance of Los Angeles at night and paint a portrait of my city. It took me 6 months of on and off shooting to finish this project.

Shooting time lapses is a labor of love and a study in patience.

This video is dedicated to the memory of my Grandmother. She spent most of her life bettering the lives of others and was exemplary of what humanity can be in its purest form.

 

Nominated for the 2012 Vimeo Festival Awards. Open to public voting – vote here.

One million robots in three years – Foxconn’s Robot Kingdom

The largest private employer in China, Foxconn with over 1 million employees, is finally facing stiff labor costs. This is great news for the U.S. manufacturing sector who may be able to lure some work back to the United States.

It will be interesting to see how this affects the global market, but for now the advantage is all for the robots:

Taiwanese technology giant Foxconn will replace some of its workers with 1 million robots in three years to cut rising labor expenses and improve efficiency, said Terry Gou, founder and chairman of the company, late Friday.

The robots will be used to do simple and routine work such as spraying, welding and assembling which are now mainly conducted by workers, said Gou at a workers’ dance party Friday night.

Foxconn, the world’s largest maker of computer components which assembles products for Apple, Sony and Nokia.

via Xinhua News Agency

A quote from Foxconn reveals that the issue of rising labor costs for the company are just going to get worse:

…talked about moving its human workers “higher up the value chain” and into sexy fields such as research.

via The Economist

10 things you need to know about MLB's new labor deal

There are several thorough and full summaries of baseball’s new labor deal, also known as MLB’s Collective Bargaining Agreement (CBA). I’ve read through them and found some interesting pieces:

1. Houston Astros will move to the AL West – starting in the 2013 season and new owner Jim Crane is receiving $70 million off his purchase price for allowing it to happen.

2. Hide the tobacco – players, managers, and coaches will be prohibited from using smokeless tobacco during televised interviews and team appearances. Once stadium gates open, players, managers and coaches must conceal tobacco products and may not carry tobacco products in their uniforms or on their bodies, but they can still use it.

3. Instant replay – in addition to home run balls will be used on fair/foul and “trapped” ball plays (close catches).

4. All-Star Game mandatory participation – players chosen must participate unless injured or given a note from the Commissioner.

5. Two Wild Cards – a second wild card will be instituted in each league. In this system, the two wild cards in each league will play a one-game playoff, the winner will play the team with the best record in the league, even if that team is in the same division.

6. New 100 mph helmet - a new Rawlings helmet designed to protect against 100 mph pitches will be required for the 2013 season.

7. No more low-density maple bats – no new player entering the major leagues can use a low density maple bat.

8. Signing bonus - are being reined in, subject to limitations, taxes, and all that.

9. Minimum salary - in majors $480,000 and in the minors $78,250.

10. Steroids – all players will be test for steroids in spring training, can be tested anytime during the season, and there will be 200+ random tests during the off-season.

10 things you need to know about MLB’s new labor deal

There are several thorough and full summaries of baseball’s new labor deal, also known as MLB’s Collective Bargaining Agreement (CBA). I’ve read through them and found some interesting pieces:

1. Houston Astros will move to the AL West – starting in the 2013 season and new owner Jim Crane is receiving $70 million off his purchase price for allowing it to happen.

2. Hide the tobacco – players, managers, and coaches will be prohibited from using smokeless tobacco during televised interviews and team appearances. Once stadium gates open, players, managers and coaches must conceal tobacco products and may not carry tobacco products in their uniforms or on their bodies, but they can still use it.

3. Instant replay – in addition to home run balls will be used on fair/foul and “trapped” ball plays (close catches).

4. All-Star Game mandatory participation – players chosen must participate unless injured or given a note from the Commissioner.

5. Two Wild Cards – a second wild card will be instituted in each league. In this system, the two wild cards in each league will play a one-game playoff, the winner will play the team with the best record in the league, even if that team is in the same division.

6. New 100 mph helmet - a new Rawlings helmet designed to protect against 100 mph pitches will be required for the 2013 season.

7. No more low-density maple bats – no new player entering the major leagues can use a low density maple bat.

8. Signing bonus - are being reined in, subject to limitations, taxes, and all that.

9. Minimum salary - in majors $480,000 and in the minors $78,250.

10. Steroids – all players will be test for steroids in spring training, can be tested anytime during the season, and there will be 200+ random tests during the off-season.

Do young Americans want to work?

As in, get a job?

Despite all the haranguing on our economy and jobs market, why aren’t we talking more about the massive labor imbalance in our country?

A recent Rutgers University survey of 571 Americans who graduated from college between 2006 and 2010 found that only 53% held full-time jobs. And yet, it’s not hard to understand why. In 2009, of the 1,601,000 bachelor’s degrees conferred, the greatest numbers fell into the fields of business (348,000); social sciences and history (169,000) and health sciences (120,000).

I had to look up health science and found this description:

The health sciences are concerned with the development of knowledge and programs related to health and well being. Health science is also concerned with the study of leisure and cultural phenomena.

And just so we’re all on the same page, social sciences include: anthropology, archaeology, communication, criminology, political science, sociology and psychology.

I’m going to refrain from commenting on the social and health science and history majors and instead take a moment to focus on business majors. You would think having a prevalence of business majors would be a positive for our economy, but we first need people who can actually make something before we need the people to market, sell and manage it.

We are missing the makers (engineers and scientists), the people who have the skills and knowledge to create something.

The fact is, there are jobs in this country. According to the most recent report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, over three million job opportunities are unfilled in the United States right now, the highest level in three years. And yet, in that same period we have produced the highest unemployment rate we’ve seen in over two decades.

I was at my alma mater (James Madison University) a few months ago and caught up with a former professor in the college of Integrated Science and Technology (ISAT) ; she told me that enrollment numbers in ISAT were the lowest they’ve ever been, even though these students are the most desirable and in demand by employers. Given the current economy and jobs market, I was a little shocked.

I’ll be honest here and say that when I was 17, college and majors didn’t consume my thoughts nearly as much as boys and field hockey. I went to JMU because it had the best field hockey program in the country. And my parents essentially chose my major for me. I was pretty ambivalent about what I wanted to do. There was lots that interested me (minus Accounting). At one point it was Law, another time English, I even considered Business. But my parents reasoned that I was good at math and science and the world needed more women in STEM, so I said sure, why not.

When I graduated, I had 15 job offers. Looking back, I’m certain my collegiate experience would have been a lot easier if I majored in something that didn’t require me to spend so much time in computer and science labs, but in this tech-centric day and age, I’m glad I left knowing how to program and build a website, amongst other things.

How many young Americans today think about employability? If you look at the degrees that are most likely to land a person a job, there seems to be a disconnect with the majors students are pursuing the most. Case in point,  in 2009, degrees in “parks, recreation, and leisure studies” saw a 43 percent increase. Yep, the things with budgets first to get cut in a recession are what students are flocking to.

I’m not saying people should neglect their true callings in life. In fact, I think the world benefits the most from the people who vigorously pursue their passions, including social psychology majors (who have the highest unemployability rate). But for those who aren’t so sure what path to pursue, wouldn’t it make sense to take a look around, at the state of the country, and consider majoring in something employable?

Incidentally, it seems the United States isn’t alone in its labor gap. A recent report from the British Chambers of Commerce reveals small businesses are frustrated at the quality of applicants, who they say can barely concentrate or add up. The report warns: ‘Too many people [are] coming out with fairly useless degrees in non-serious subjects.’

Labor Stats on Labor Day

In honor of Labor Day I visited a favorite government website, the Occupational Outlook Handbook.

The handbook covers every career in America and discusses interesting things, like day-in-the-life, growth potential, education needed, salary ranges. 

For a young whippersnapper it was perfect. I would browse everything from doctor to trash man to college professor.

Today, I found several images that reflect interesting labor trends in America. Here they are, enjoy, and Happy Labor Day!
 

Ethnicity

 

80%+ of the work force is White, while persons of Hispanic origin are projected to increase, by 2018, their share of the labor force from 14.3 percent to 17.6 percent.

 

 

 Age

 

Largest group of the workforce, 23.3%, are those age 45-54, followed closely by those aged 35-44, 22.7%.

 

 

 New Jobs

 

Most new jobs in America are projected to come from healthcare and scientific/technical professions.

 

 

Fastest Growing Jobs


 

Largest Group of New Jobs

 

Clearly, thousands of jobs, nearly all the jobs, will be healthcare.

 

 

Fastest Decline

 

Bye, bye manufacturing….

 

 

Education

 

Get an associate’s after high school, or a master’s after undergrad and you will be much better off.

 

 

Good Producing Jobs

 

We don’t produce goods anymore, just houses.

 

 

Change in Employment

 

We are definitely becoming more of a service society…not sure that is a good thing.