Facebook Programming Challenge – solve a challenge, get a phone interview

 

How does this work?

Take the timed challenge. If your code passes the test, you will be contacted for a telephone interview. If your code is too similar to another applicant, you will both be disqualified, so please don’t share or post your answers online.

What position are these tests for?

These are for various positions in our Software Engineering department. You can check them all out here.

 

Take the Facebook Programming Challenge!

Start-up perks – the standards, impressive ones, & no way that’s amazing

We asked more than a dozen startups (Thrillist, Fab, Tumblr, Jetsetter, StumbleUpon, Asana, Eventbrite, Warby Parker, Rent the Runway, Coloft, ZocDoc, GetGlue, Foursquare, Birchbox, Modcloth, Evernote) what perks they offer and we’ve grouped these perks into three tiers, giving you the sampling of who offers what and why these companies think it wise to spend money on them.

The Standards

  • Free snacks
  • Free coffee
  • Casual dress code
  • Dog-friendly office
  • Ping pong table, pool table, foosball table or basketball hoop.

Wow, That’s Impressive

  • Catered lunch every day.
  • Paid vacation day on your birthday.
  • $100 Uber car credit each month (StumbleUpon) or car service for late nights (Tumblr).
  • A “Fun Committee” to plan company outings, such as ice skating, scavenger hunts.

Really? That’s Amazing

  • Unlimited sick and vacation days, because “we believe in treating everyone like an adult,” says Braley. (Thrillist, ZocDoc, ModCloth, Foursquare).
  • A tab at the local coffee shop, so teammates don’t have to eat the cost of networking (Jetsetter).
  • In-office massages, chiropractor and acupuncture sessions every week (Eventbrite).

Just small selection of the perks from the articleAre These the Best Startup Perks You’ve Ever Seen?

Continue reading Start-up perks – the standards, impressive ones, & no way that’s amazing

Klout – using data to determine your influence and then give you free stuff

I love this story of Klout founder Joe Fernandez:

With his jaw still clamped shut, recovering in his Lower East Side apartment, Fernandez opened an Excel file and began to enter data on everyone he was connected to on Facebook and Twitter: how many followers they had, how often they posted, how often others responded to or retweeted those posts. Some contacts (for instance, his young cousins) had hordes of Facebook friends but seemed to wield little overall influence. Others posted rarely, but their missives were consistently rebroadcast far and wide. He was building an algorithm that measured who sparked the most subsequent online actions. He sorted and re-sorted, weighing various metrics, looking at how they might shape results. Once he’d figured out a few basic principles, Fernandez hired a team of Singaporean coders to flesh out his ideas. Then, realizing the 13-hour time difference would impede their progress, he offshored himself. For four months, he lived in Singapore, sleeping on couches or in his programmers’ offices. On Christmas Eve of 2008, back in New York a year after his surgery, Fernandez launched Klout with a single tweet. By September 2009, he’d relocated to San Francisco to be closer to the social networking companies whose data Klout’s livelihood depends on. (His first offices were in the same building as Twitter headquarters.)

via Wired

 

Fast forward a few years and Klout has become a big deal (in social media).

One more interesting element of the story:

As the child of a casino executive who specialized in herding rich South American gamblers into comped Caesars Palace suites, Fernandez saw up close and from a young age the power of free perks as a marketing tool.

Which provides the final piece to the puzzle. The perks that Klout gives out allow the company to connect users with brands, and monetize their business.

It’s brilliant because it gives everybody something they want, whether it be free stuff or engaged customers.