Comic-Con goes LGBT in 2012 – costumes, panels, & storylines

Caped crusaders are out and proud this year at Comic-Con International. Even Superman and Batman at the Prism Comics booth wear snug Underoos, capes and chef’s aprons — but not much else — as they entertain passersby.

“It feels revolutionary,” says Scott Covert, decked out as Batman’s sidekick, Robin, at one of the convention’s many panels about gay culture and the comic book world. He flips the lip of his cape as he adds, “There’s more tolerance this year.”

Gay Geekdom celebrated last month when Marvel’s mutant superhero, Northstar, married his longtime partner, Kyle, in “Astonishing X-Men No. 51.” The day the issue was released, comic book shops nationwide, including L.A.’s Meltdown Comics, hosted commitment ceremonies, vow renewals or parties; and there was a legal same-sex wedding at Midtown Comics in Manhattan.

Also in June, DC Comics resurrected the original Golden Age Green Lantern, featuring Alan Scott as a gay man. Even Archie Comics’ All-American Riverdale was the site of a biracial, military-themed, same-sex wedding earlier this year.

 

More on this – Hero Complex: Comic-Con: Gay characters enjoying new prominence, tolerance

 

 

Continue reading Comic-Con goes LGBT in 2012 – costumes, panels, & storylines

The last man in Fukushima – emptiness, evacuated cities, men in radiation suits

Today marks the anniversary of the devastating earthquake that hit Japan. One survivor shares his tale.

Only Naoto Matsumura remains inside the exclusion zone, without electricity and running water and braving the loneliness and the constant threat of exposure to elevated levels of radiation to feed a menagerie of animals.

Do American think nuclear power is safe, even after Fukushima? …Yes

 Despite concerns about a possible nuclear disaster in the U.S.,

58% of Americans think nuclear power plants in the U.S. are safe, while 36% say they are not.

Nuclear power remains very much in the news as workers in Japan continue efforts to contain the disastrous impact of the March 11 earthquake and tsunami on nuclear power plants along that country’s northern coast.

In a survey conducted just days later, Gallup found 7 in 10 Americans saying that as a result of the events in Japan, they were more concerned about a nuclear disaster occurring in the U.S.

Still, a March 25-27 Gallup survey shows that a clear majority of Americans believe nuclear plants in the U.S. are safe.

via Gallup

 

Here is a follow-up post that shows 14 near meltdowns in 2010 and 56 serious violations from 2007-2011, and yet Congress and the public were told that “all is well.”