Tag Archives: posts

Kara Swisher turns the Yahoo! drama into a soap opera – and it’s too much fun!

Boy, have I got a soap opera for you. It’s a saga of tech nerdery and an old-school company trying to reinvent itself.

The story starts with Kara Swisher, of All Things D, who has gone gaga over the hiring of Marissa Mayer as Yahoo’s CEO. In the 37 days since the announcement (July 16, 2012) she has personally written 32 articles.

Each one with a title full of pizzazz and humorous photos (of mostly cats). The content is all serious and interesting to read as Marissa seems to be hitting all the right notes. But, the way Kara is playing it out is just too much fun.

Take a look at the titles below and you will see what I mean:

 

This Week in MarissYa: iPhones for All, Flickr Love and Management Musical Chairs

With Nearly 10 Percent Drop in Week After Alibaba Cash Switch, Yahoo Shareholders in “Marissery”

 

Mine! Mine! All Mine! Yahoo Says It Might Just Keep Those Alibaba Billions, Rather Than Giving the $ Back to Shareholders.

Mayer Will Extend Free Food to NYC Too, While “What Is Yahoo?” Question Is Hereby Banish’d

 

Here’s the Do-Not-Forward Mayer Memo Bidding Goodbye to Ross “The Hair” Levinsohn From Yahoo (His Farewell and SEC Docs, Too)

In Week Two, Marissa Mayer Googifies Yahoo: Free Food! Friday Afternoon All-Hands! New Work Spaces! Fab Swag!

 

“Yes, Keep Moving”: Marissa Mayer’s First Memo to Yahoos (Natch!)

 

How about a few hash tags for the drama:

#MarissYa – #Marissery – #Mine!Mine!Mine! – #freefood – #yahooglers – #RossTheHairLevinson – #googifies -#natch!

 

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Researchers explore Chinese censors – find 13% of posts blocked but not those criticizing government

The 500m people who use the internet in China have long been aware of the presence of the censors who watch their movements online and delete their more inflammatory posts. Now those monitors may have to get used to someone watching over their shoulders.

Teams at Harvard and the University of Hong Kong have been using new software that allows them to watch the censoring of posts on Chinese social-media sites more closely than before. And now they have started to release some of their key findings.

  • Found that 13% of all social-media posts in China were censored.
  • Posts critical of the government are not rigorously censored.
  • But, posts that have the purpose of getting people to assemble, potentially in protest, are swept from the internet within a matter of hours.
  • Censoring of topics, days before the news broke.

Keep reading to learn how this data is allowing researchers to challenge the censorsThe Economist: Monitoring the monitors

 

 

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Journalists are becoming very popular in Facebook

In September 2011, Facebook introduced the Subscribe feature, allowing anyone to subscribe to the updates of anyone else. For public figures, like journalists, with thousands of followers this has turned out to be a boon.

Since its launch, thousands of journalists have enabled Subscribe, with news organizations like Washington Post (90+ journalists using the feature) and The New York Times (50+ journalists using the feature) leading the way. The average journalist has seen a 320% increase in subscribers since November 2011, according to our analysis of a sample of 25 journalists across a variety of outlets who enabled subscribe in September.

From journalists like CNN’s Don Lemon postingbreaking news about Jon Huntsman to The New York Times Moscow bureau reporter Michael Schwirtz posting live videos as he covered recent protests.

Content Breakdown

Based on the analysis we conducted, here are some of the trends we’re seeing in the type of content journalists are producing on Facebook, as well as what content receives above-average feedback. Let’s start with content types:

  • Questions and Input: 25% of posts contain a question to the reader.
  • Links: 62% of posts contain a link. And when reporters include analysis with the links, those links receive 20% more referral clicks on average.
  • Photos: 12% of posts were photos. Posts with photos receive 50% more likes than posts without photos.

So of the content that journalists are sharing, what actually works?

There are several types of content that seem to produce above-average feedback from subscribers…

keep reading - Facebook + Journalists