The Atlantic goes full speed ahead on digital, internet – gives up on print, magazines

Only a few print magazines understand the internet – and The Atlantic is one of them. Now in their third year of profit, after spending a decade losing millions, the magazine is ready to expand. And the next step is to let the print magazine die and expand with more websites. From the N.Y. Times:

“It’s become very, very clear to me that digital trumps print, and that pure digital, without any legacy costs, massively trumps print,” David G. Bradley said.

And digital is where The Atlantic is going, with three successful sites – TheAtlantic.comAtlantic WireAtlantic Cities – and one more launching this week, Quartz.com. A business news site focused on a global audience – from the Editor’s Note:

We’ve assembled a team of digital journalists and developers to create a new kind of business news offering that is global, digitally native, and designed for the mobile and tablet devices.

Full speed ahead on digital, mobile, and social. And while this sounds like just another website, the team has some interesting insights that may give them an advantage. “Data is ubiquitous while real insight on the news is a rare commodity.” I would agree. When everybody reports the same news, if you can consistently provide better insight – that’s an advantage.

“Any good blog or magazine has defining obsessions, and we’ll structure around the ones that we think smart, globally minded people will be interested in.” Don’t you love how he interchanges the words blog and magazine – as if they are the same thing.

Finally, the site will be free – no paywalls or subscriptions – instead showing ads from sponsors in the news stream. It’s the newest digital model that avoids big banner ads – and the company already has four paid sponsors until the end of the year.

And we shouldn’t be surprised they’re adopting the latest digital innovation. The company is diving into digital and giving up on it’s print roots. Something that few print publications will ever do.

 

Continue reading The Atlantic goes full speed ahead on digital, internet – gives up on print, magazines

Random acts of journalism – the new media

People don’t care about scoops, they care about trust. Social media has compressed the news cycle to the point where the half-life of a scoop is measured in minutes rather than hours or days.

The number of people who care about who reported something first is rapidly diminishing

Instead, what matters most to readers and listeners and viewers is the trustworthiness of the source, whether it’s a TV program or a newspaper. Trust is “the new black.”

The reality of the news ecosystem now is that news can be broken by just about anyone, including non-journalists who happen to be close to an event, who often wind up committing what NPR’s Andy Carvin has called “random acts of journalism.”

Trust is the benchmark for any news outlet or media source — regardless of what medium it publishes through or whether those producing the content have degrees from a journalism school or ink beneath their fingers.

via Mathew Ingram

Edison delays investigation of San Onofre nuclear leak – local newspapers stop covering completely

March 2, 2012 – Southern California Edison (SCE) continues to perform extensive testing and inspections of the steam generators at the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station.

“Nuclear safety is our top priority,” said Pete Dietrich, SCE senior vice president and chief nuclear officer. “Everything we do — from normal plant operations and routine refueling…”

– Edison PR

I don’t want to be controversial, but this is starting to sound like a delay tactic. The leaking nuclear steam turbine was taken offline over two months ago with an investigation to follow. The initial word was that a report would be issued “the following week.”

After that deadline passed a few newspapers reported the delay. Then, Barbara Boxer, California’s Senator, issued a concerned letter and so did the local city council.

Still no results from the investigation.

Even the local newspapers, with readers in the fallout zone, have stopped reporting on it. The issue seems to be sliding into the rear view mirror, and perhaps that’s the way Edison wants it.

The leak has become much more serious than initially reported. Our local journalists (at the LA Times, OC Register, and San Diego UT) did us a disservice by simply reporting what Edison told them: the leak was tiny, no safety issues were posed, and Edison is doing everything right.

A line they still stick to (when they do cover it).

My own investigations turned up something different. First, the report to the NRC said that the first unit leaked up to 82 gallons/day of radioactive steam. Second, the sister unit had upwards of 1,000 pipes showing radiation damage. Third, there was another incident back in November with an ammonia leak.

Yeah, nothing to worry about here, Edison has it all under control. Two reactors turned off, one leaking, radiation damage, and ammonia problems.

It doesn’t help that Edison is purposely ambiguous in their statements. The only significant piece of information in the latest press release (linked above) is that some of the 1,000 pipes have been “plugged”. Which begs the question, were they leaking?

I understand these things are complicated but the longer the issue drags on the worse it seems to get. Edison isn’t becoming any more honest in their dealings with the public. The newspapers are continuing their anti-journalistic approach.

I have to wonder if the approach is to delay, wait until any public interest dies down, and then handle it their own way.

Stay tuned and remember that the nuclear industry has a very poor track record and may have no regulatory control.

Will Apple’s iBooks Author open the door for a new form of journalism?

As a journalism instructor, it’s iBooks Author that has me most intrigued…because it’s not just for textbooks, and not just for textbook publishers. It is a fantastic tool for communications professionals, including journalists.

Let me cut to the chase: I think iBooks Author could be the platform for a whole new form of rich-media, long-form journalism.

We now have, for free, a tool that lets us tell stories and present stories that combine all the interactivity and engagement we could dream of.

In a single tool, I can combine what would have been done via video clips, feature stories, podcasts, photo essays, study guides and polls.

It’s a platform that encourages readers to touch, listen to, watch, engage with and learn from your story.

Right now, newspapers and magazines should be figuring out how to turn their best long-form work into iBooks. They should be considering doing iBook-only special projects. And, you can bet my journalism students at Western are going to be all over this when my online journalism class starts next month.

via Wayne MacPhail

Will Apple's iBooks Author open the door for a new form of journalism?

As a journalism instructor, it’s iBooks Author that has me most intrigued…because it’s not just for textbooks, and not just for textbook publishers. It is a fantastic tool for communications professionals, including journalists.

Let me cut to the chase: I think iBooks Author could be the platform for a whole new form of rich-media, long-form journalism.

We now have, for free, a tool that lets us tell stories and present stories that combine all the interactivity and engagement we could dream of.

In a single tool, I can combine what would have been done via video clips, feature stories, podcasts, photo essays, study guides and polls.

It’s a platform that encourages readers to touch, listen to, watch, engage with and learn from your story.

Right now, newspapers and magazines should be figuring out how to turn their best long-form work into iBooks. They should be considering doing iBook-only special projects. And, you can bet my journalism students at Western are going to be all over this when my online journalism class starts next month.

via Wayne MacPhail