The Atlantic goes full speed ahead on digital, internet – gives up on print, magazines

Only a few print magazines understand the internet – and The Atlantic is one of them. Now in their third year of profit, after spending a decade losing millions, the magazine is ready to expand. And the next step is to let the print magazine die and expand with more websites. From the N.Y. Times:

“It’s become very, very clear to me that digital trumps print, and that pure digital, without any legacy costs, massively trumps print,” David G. Bradley said.

And digital is where The Atlantic is going, with three successful sites – TheAtlantic.comAtlantic WireAtlantic Cities – and one more launching this week, Quartz.com. A business news site focused on a global audience – from the Editor’s Note:

We’ve assembled a team of digital journalists and developers to create a new kind of business news offering that is global, digitally native, and designed for the mobile and tablet devices.

Full speed ahead on digital, mobile, and social. And while this sounds like just another website, the team has some interesting insights that may give them an advantage. “Data is ubiquitous while real insight on the news is a rare commodity.” I would agree. When everybody reports the same news, if you can consistently provide better insight – that’s an advantage.

“Any good blog or magazine has defining obsessions, and we’ll structure around the ones that we think smart, globally minded people will be interested in.” Don’t you love how he interchanges the words blog and magazine – as if they are the same thing.

Finally, the site will be free – no paywalls or subscriptions – instead showing ads from sponsors in the news stream. It’s the newest digital model that avoids big banner ads – and the company already has four paid sponsors until the end of the year.

And we shouldn’t be surprised they’re adopting the latest digital innovation. The company is diving into digital and giving up on it’s print roots. Something that few print publications will ever do.

 

Continue reading The Atlantic goes full speed ahead on digital, internet – gives up on print, magazines

A force in the sport of surfing – photographer Aaron Chang

The Aaron Chang bio:

As a force in visually defining the sport of surfing Aaron has pursued his photography to the far ends of the earth. For 25 years, as a senior photographer for Surfing magazine, Aaron was at the core of the surfing world discovering new talent and surf spots on a global scale. Having traveled to 40+ countries in search of the perfect adventure Aaron’s work has graced the covers of over 100 magazines.

 

Aaron is a legend and his work is amazing. His next great adventure is opening his own gallery in Southern California. Below are some pieces of his, including many shots from his gallery.

 

 

Continue reading A force in the sport of surfing – photographer Aaron Chang

Follow the Light chooses best new surf photographers, Shawn Parkin & Sara Lee

The Follow the Light Foundation (FTLF) was created in the spirit and memory of Larry “Flame” Moore who was Surfing Magazine’s Photo Editor for more than 30 years.

The organization awards a grant each year to best new surf photographer, helping to finance their dreams and push the sport and its lensmen forward.

Follow the Light

 

Shawn Parkin – Overall Winner

 

 

 

Sara Lee – People’s Choice

 

 

// Videos courtesy of Swell Blog

Salted Magazine – a new all-female surfing magazine from the editors of Surfer

The time has come. We’re finally giving female surfers the love they deserve in a brand-new, all-girls magazine, SALTED. The mag, created by the editors of SURFER Magazine, features the best female surfers on the planet, trips to the most idyllic locales, profiles, interviews, history, fashion features, and more. It’s is a much-overdue homage to women’s surfing, all made with the quality, authenticity, and top-notch imagery you’ve come to expect from SURFER.

Hitting newsstands August 14, SALTED is nearly 100 pages of uninterrupted female surf content in an oversized, glossy format. Find it at your local surf shop or bookstore. The digital version will also be available on the Apple Newsstand beginning August 6.

 

Source: Surfer – Introducing Salted Magazine

Frankie Harrer, one of the many surfers featured in the debut issue of Salted. (Morgan Maassen)

Continue reading Salted Magazine – a new all-female surfing magazine from the editors of Surfer

Paintballing with Hezbollah – they cheat, take hostages, and bring their own grenades

We figured they’d cheat; they were Hezbollah, after all. But none of us—a team of four Western journalists—thought we’d be dodging military-grade flash bangs when we initiated this “friendly” paintball match.

As my eyesight returns and readjusts to the dim arena light, I poke out from my position behind a low cinder-block wall. Two large men in green jumpsuits are bearing down on me. I have them right in my sights, but they seem unfazed—even as I open fire from close range, peppering each with several clear, obvious hits. I expect them to freeze, maybe even acknowledge that this softie American journalist handily overcame their flash-bang trickery and knocked them out of the game. Perhaps they’ll even smile and pat me on the back as they walk off the playing field in a display of good sportsmanship (after cheating, of course).

Instead, they shoot me three times, point-blank, right in the groin…

Yes, I remind myself, this is really happening: Four Western journalists (two of whom alternated in and out of our rounds of four-on-four), plus one former Army Ranger-turned-counterinsurgency expert, are playing paintball with members of the Shiite militant group frequently described by US national security experts as the “A-Team of terrorism.” It took nearly a full year to pull together this game, and all along I’d been convinced that things would fall apart at the last minute. Fraternizing with Westerners is not the sort of thing Hezbollah top brass allows, so to arrange the match I’d relied on a man we’ll call Ali, one of my lower-level contacts within the group.

 

Keep readingPaintballing with Hezbollah, is the path straight to their hearts

Continue reading Paintballing with Hezbollah – they cheat, take hostages, and bring their own grenades

New Yorker to release famous author’s short story as serialized tweets

I do like the idea of serialized stories, similar to Charles Dickens in the 19th century.

Starting Thursday night, the New Yorker’s Twitter fiction handle, @NYerFiction, will post a new tweet of text from Jennifer Egan’s 8,500 word story, “Black Box”, every minute between 8 p.m. and 9 p.m. The tweets will continue for 10 straight nights. Readers can find a summary of the text posted on the magazine’s Web site at 9 p.m. each evening.

The article, built around a character in her Pulitzer Prize-winning novel “A Visit From the Goon Squad,” will appear in the magazine’s first science fiction issue, which comes out on May 29th.

The story is a running scroll of a spy keeping a log of her current mission. Ms. Egan said that when she was writing, she struggled not to make the language sound “gimmicky” or “cartoonish.”

“I’m just interested in serialization in fiction,” said Ms. Egan. “I’m fascinated by it. I love the 19th-century novels. I’m interested in ways to bring that back to fiction.”

via Media Decoder

 

Follow the story at – @NYerFiction – which currently has 2,375 followers.

The Innovation Whiteboard – get your idea published in the New York Times

What innovations have you made in your daily life? Whether it’s a gadget you’ve fashioned, or something less tangible, we want to hear about it. Your submissions will be published on nytimes.com and may be featured in the New York Times Magazine if our judges — Martha Stewart, James Dyson, Paola Antonelli and Ben Kaufman — select your idea. Submit now:

Innovation Whiteboard

For a special issue on June 3, we invite you to share an innovation that you have made in your daily life. Maybe you’ve figured out a way to make waking up more pleasant by jury-rigging your alarm clock. Or maybe you’ve invented a foolproof method for shining your shoes, or for finding time to exercise. It could be a gadget you’ve fashioned, or something less tangible. We want to hear what you’ve come up with.

To be published in the June 3 issue.

Submissions will be accepted until May 7 at 9 a.m. Eastern time.

 

// Thx to Neville Hobson, Photo – Seth1492

The case of the missing fish – why local seafood doesn’t exist

San Diego’s famous spiny lobsters are disappearing from…San Diego.

It’s partially a simple case of supply and demand. Lobster lovers in other markets—from L.A. to China—have a bigger demand, and they’re willing to pay for it.

“Our home consumer is getting priced out,” explains Catalina Offshore Products fishmonger Tommy Gomes. “A couple years ago, lobsters were $7 per pound. Now it’s $17 to $19. I’ve never seen such high prices.”

America’s high sustainability standards also drive up prices. Fishing is limited to specified areas, during specified months. Quotas are tight. Spiny lobster can only be harvested using one trap on one fishing line. “In some parts of the world,” says Paddy Glennon, vice president of sales at Santa Monica Seafood, “you can find 100 traps on one line across three miles.”

The goal of such restrictions—long-term survival of a crucial food source—is both admirable and necessary.

Lobster isn’t the first local delicacy to hop a red-eye out of San Diego.

“San Diego used to be the tuna capital of the world, but the exodus of the tuna fleet occurred when it became dolphin safe,” says American Tuna’s Natalie Webster. “Now 84 percent of the fish the U.S. consumes is imported; we can’t compete with tuna processed in Thailand or third-world countries since we don’t pay people 25 cents a day.”

Ultimately, the consumer will decide whether keeping local food in town is worth the cost. It’s not an easy sell, especially to Americans, who only spend 9.8 percent of their income on food—the lowest, globally.

“We are a culture that relishes cheap products, including seafood,” says Gomes. “To save money, Americans are eating third-world frozen fish with phosphates and glazed with chemicals.”

via San Diego Magazine

How much do you think it costs to travel on the Surfing World Tour?

You make the world tour, have 11 stops around the world and some cash to be made…. so, did ya ever wonder how much it would cost to travel the world tour?

 

Stop 1 – Gold Coast for the Quikkie Pro – roundtrip airfare, food, lodging, transportation: $2000

Stop 2 – LAX to Melbourne for the Rip Curl Pro: $1500

Stop 3 – Rio, Brazil for the Billabong Pro: $1500

Stop 11 – Hawaii for Pipe Masters $1500

 

Total cost – $27,000

 

It’s safe to say, no one is stressed about the costs of travel. Just $27000 to compete…. considering these guys make no less than $77K per year for just showing up and placing =25th, it’s no brainer… they can place last in every event and still show a net profit of 50K …. throw in their endorsements, if any, and they’re all making over a hundred K no matter how bad they surf….

See the cost of all 11 stops on the Surfing World Tour