The stop-motion story of a bookmark that comes alive – Much Better Now

Narrative:

The main character is a bookmark, stuck in a forgotten book. Both are connected by chance, in a life marked by standstill in a deserted room.

One day a window is pressed open by a gust of wind, knocking over the book and blowing the bookmark onto the table. As they become separated, the journey begins. While the bookmark watches from a distance, the wind catches the pages, turning them into ocean waves.

Unfolding hands and feet, the bookmark is swept back into the book. With a surfboard taken from the book, the character is given the opportunity to experience its environment in a new way – wipeouts, washouts and nosedives in a wild ocean follow. Just as our hero is willing to resign, the ocean carries it higher and higher on a wave frozen in time – they become one. The wave breaks, releasing everything back into motion.

The bookmark enjoys the ride of its life, carving and floating its way in and out of tubes, until the last page is reached. The book cover closes with a snap, spitting out the surfer. The journey through this episode of its life is over. As the protagonist tries to get back into the book, light reveals other parts of the room, fully packed with bookshelves. It faces endless challenges in its newly gained freedom.

 

A short video – Making of…

Continue reading The stop-motion story of a bookmark that comes alive – Much Better Now

Pixar’s best kept secret – the Cereal Bar

If you happen to own Toy Story 3, one of the bonus features is a short video entitled “Pixar’s Cereal Bar.”

In the video you’ll hear Pixar employees like Tia Kratter, Pete Doctor, and Andrew Stanton talking about the importance of cereal during a workday, and showing off an animated representation of how the Pixar Cereal Room fuels some of the best creative minds in the business!

According to Pixar employees, this room is well-used and well-loved! They eat cereal everywhere — from the screening room to the meeting room — and even at their desks!

Continue reading Pixar’s best kept secret – the Cereal Bar

Short documentary on Ken Burns – about the craft of storytelling

What makes a great story? For legendary filmmaker Ken Burns, the answer is both complicated and personal. In this short documentary about the craft of storytelling, he explains his lifelong mission to wake the dead.

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Read a Q&A with the filmmakers Sarah Klein and Tom Mason.

Like Ken Burns on Facebook.

Vidal Sassoon – early 80’s commercial

He’ll be best remembered for his concept of the wash-and-go approach to hair care: A cut so simple and so good that it required little maintenance.

Wrote Adam Bernstein, in Sassoon’s obituary:

Clean geometric lines had been Mr. Sassoon’s driving motivation since opening his first salon in London in 1954. At the time, most women were resigned to going to bed at night with rollers in their hair. His approach grew into a direct assault on the beehive style and other formidable towers of hair seemingly shellacked with hairspray.

In 1957, he launched a fruitful collaboration with British clothes designer Mary Quant, the widely acknowledged “mother of the miniskirt.” In the bob style he perfected for Quant — who wanted her models’ necks and shoulders bare — Mr. Sassoon crafted a look that was tight at the nape but allowed the hair to fall in a flirty, bohemian cascade.

The “Sassoon bob” became the rage of Swinging London and one of the most enduring hairstyles of the last half-century. Variations on the bob included the popular “five-point” cut first modelled in 1963 by Grace Coddington.

Subsequent hairstyles he promoted included an asymmetrical, peek-a-boo bob and a short, closely curled look called the “greek goddess.”

via – Vidal Sassoon: The Legacy

 

// Thx – Loren Feldman

A broken-down inner city overrun by giant trees

“This is a short story told on a big wall at Village Underground in Shoreditch, London”

it’s a harmless-enough depiction of a broken-down inner city overrun by giant trees. The neat part is that Peel decided to make the process of painting the mural a work of art in itself, using time-lapse shots taken over the course of three weeks.

From the first frames, it’s obvious that this is no ordinary mural. A butterfly flits across a blue background then disappears from the frame, leaving no trace of its presence on the wall. Towering cranes sprout up and begin to build a city, loading bricks in rows from the ground up like a regular construction crew. At times, debris from the painting, like orange rubble, seems to fall out of the wall, becoming its three-dimensional equivalent on the sidewalk. At another moment a real plastic bag flying in the wind is sucked into the mural and locked in painted stasis.

via Atlantic Cities

Award winning short film, CatCam, documents the mysterious life a cat outside the house

Mr. Lee, an adopted stray cat, routinely disappeared from his South Carolina home for days on end. Intrigued by Mr. Lee’s whereabouts, his owner Juergen, a German engineer, created a camera designed to fit around the feline’s neck. Engineered to capture continuous photographs, Juergen hoped to discover the mysterious life of his cat. After many unsuccessful attempts, Mr. Lee returned with the camera in tact and photographic evidence of his travels. Intrigued by his findings, Juergen published the photographs on the internet, unaware that his small invention would send shockwaves around the world and alter his life forever.

 

CatCamTheMovie.com

 

Thx to Laughing Squid