Tag Archives: camera

Google Maps adds underwater imagery – go diving in Hawaii, Australia, & the Philippines

Maps go underwater now as Google has added panoramic imagery of Hawaii, Australia, and the Philippines. From the Google Maps Blog:

Find a sea turtle swimming among a school of fish, follow a manta ray and experience the reef at sunset. in the Great Barrier Reed. At Apo Island, a volcanic island and marine reserve in the Philippines, you can see an ancient boulder coral, which may be several hundred years old. And in the middle of the Pacific, in Hawaii, you can join snorkelers in Oahu’s Hanauma Bay and drift over the vast coral reef at Maui’s Molokini crater.

The images are stunning as seen in this video.

 

 

The feature works like Street View in Google Maps. And the images were captured using an SVII specialized camera while traveling at 4 kilometers an hour.

View the full collection of 12 dive sites at Google Maps Ocean.

Turn the flash on your Android, iPhone camera into a flashlight

My mom shared this app with me, and it’s so obvious – turning the camera’s flash into a light – I’m amazed I didn’t think of it before. It also looks funny because it’s so incredibly bright, almost blinding in the dark. But the best phrase is that it gives new meaning to the word – flashlight.

Or, if that annoys you we can go with torch as it is called on the Android app – and in Britain. No such international wordsmithing for the iPhone version. Either way it is incredibly useful to have a light with you at all times.

Enjoy and if you know of better apps – please share.

 

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Sea Over Land – a 16mm travelogue in South Africa – surfing, elephants, and soccer

A beautiful short film by John Lynch set to the music of Sam Bauer – and the combination shines.

 

 

From the filmmaker:

I was so involved in my DSLR work, I had the impulse to look at some 16mm footage. To see what I used to shoot on my trusty old vintage 16mm Bolex.

It was refreshing to see moments in footage presented exactly the way they were filmed. No effects were necessary for the texture and feel. A quality that celluloid film will always have over digital.

I met Sam Bauer a few years ago on a project. We became friends and he expressed interest in doing a cut and composing a score to my cinematography. I gave him a series of out-takes from my 2003 South Africa Trip that became a part in “Change the Subject” (released in 2004).

Sam was the editor of Donnie Darko so he possesses natural affinity for sound design and score. This is Sam’s interpretation of the footage.

It was is refreshing to see this after so many years.

J. Lynch

Pocket microscope – turn a cellphone into a microscope for $10

The #1 innovation of 2011 - the pocket microscope – is a marvel of the cellphone age. For $10 a phone can be turned into a laboratory and offer poor areas – with no hospital – access to sophisticated medical tests. From The Scientist:

Diagnosing malaria or other blood-borne illnesses used to require analyzing cell slides under a bulky, costly light microscope—which can be difficult to find in impoverished, remote locations. Enter LUCAS (Lensless, Ultra-wide-field Cell monitoring Array platform based on Shadow imaging), an easy-to-use, pocket-size holographic microscope that weighs less than 50g, uses inexpensive, off-the-shelf parts.

The parts attach to the camera and can analyze blood and saliva samples; testing for diseases like HIV and malaria and discovering water quality problems. Listen to Professor Aydogan Ozcan – the same one who discovered the 3D motion of sperm cells – explain it himself:

 

 

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The photography of Aaron Goulding – peering inside the waves

If you want to peek inside the barrel or get up-close-and-personal with marine life, then you will love Aaron Goulding’s work. He loves grabbing those inside-the-tube shots and quiet ocean moments. But everyone wants a self-portrait of themselves catching a wave and in the barrel.

Enjoy a few of his photos and visit his company JAG Media Productions and like him on Facebook.

 

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Film night at the Surf Museum – ‘An Inside Look at Korduroy.TV’ (this Wednesday)

This Wednesday, the last of the movie nights at the California Surf Museum ends with “an inside look at Korduroy.TV”. Doors open at 6:15pm and the show starts at 7pm.

More details via Surfline:

The California Surf Museum is proud to highlight surf film-making in its non-traditional approach.  Our final Big Wednesday film night will feature two 20 minute segments of the latest and greatest Korduroy.TV clips, Q&A with the filmmakers and staff, and interesting props and cameras from the Korduroy crew.  Learn about their recent Kick-starter campaign, their company ethos, and how they are pushing surf content in a new direction.

With the advent of iPhones, cheap HD cameras, and the GoPro, a whole legion of film-makers have entered the scene. Combine their work with the long-established tradition of independent film-making in the surf world and you have a new golden age of the surf film.

Korduroy.TV is at the epicenter of this movement and growing fast. This should be the highlight of the Big Wednesday screening series.

Tickets are still available for $10 and enjoy the beautiful museum too!

 

An Inside Look at Korduroy.TV
Wednesday, August 22, 2012
Doors open, 6:15PM – Show at 7PM
CA Surf Museum – 312 Pier View Way, Oceanside, CA 92054

 

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Cell phone recording of police is ok – says Washington D.C. police chief, Cathy Lanier

We’ve written a number of stories about police officers interfering with citizens who are trying to record the actions of police in public places. In some cases, cops have arrested citizens for making recordings in public. In others, they’ve seized cell phones and deleted the recordings.

The courts and the Obama administration have both said that these activities violate the Constitution. And at least one police department has gotten the message loud and clear.

In a new legal directive first noticed by DCist, Washington DC Police Chief Cathy Lanier explains the constitutional rights of DC citizens and gives her officers detailed instructions for respecting them. She addresses a number of scenarios that have led to controversy in recent years.

“A bystander has the same right to take photographs or make recordings as a member of the media,” Chief Lanier writes. The First Amendment protects the right to record the activities of police officers, not only in public places such as parks and sidewalks, but also in “an individual’s home or business, common areas of public and private facilities and buildings, and any other public or private facility at which the individual has a legal right to be present.”

 

Keep reading: ars technica - DC police chief announces shockingly reasonable cell camera policy

 

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My Daguerreotype Boyfriend – handsome men of the 1800s

 

The daguerreotype (phonetic: dəˈɡɛrətaɪp) was the first commercially successful photographic process. The image is a direct positive made in the camera on a silvered copper plate. – Wikipedia

 

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Internet helps ‘this guy’ find his lost camera

A photograph showing the owner of a lost camera has gone viral Monday after being posted on Facebook, Reddit and other websites. Internet users are teaming up to put the camera back into the owner’s hands.

Text on the viral photo reads, “This guy lost his camera with more than 2,800 photos in Amsterdam. Who knows him? Please contact anke.appel@gmail.com.”

On Facebook, people have shared the picture more than 24,000 times in the 13 hours after Roland van Gogh uploaded it.

The photo hit Reddit on Monday afternoon, with people offering tips and making jokes. “This could use more drama,” wrote redhousebythebog. “Threaten to erase a picture every 10 minutes until the owner is found.”

 

ViaInternet Rallies to Reunite Lost Camera With Owner

Images of the lunar surface from the Apollo 17 mission

In December of 1972, Apollo 17 astronauts Eugene Cernan and Harrison Schmitt spent about 75 hours on the Moon in the Taurus-Littrow valley, while colleague Ronald Evans orbited overhead.

The image shows Schmitt on the left with the lunar rover at the edge of Shorty Crater, near the spot where geologist Schmitt discovered orange lunar soil. The Apollo 17 crew returned with 110 kilograms of rock and soil samples, more than was returned from any of the other lunar landing sites. Now forty years later, Cernan and Schmitt are still the last to walk on the Moon.

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