Tag Archives: german

In 1938, why were so many Austrians Nazi-friendly?

Why Were So Many Austrians Hitler-Friendly?

By Rick Steves

Today I stood on Vienna’s Heroes Square where, in 1938, more than 200,000 tearfully happy Austrians gathered before Adolf Hitler. The Nazi dictator stood on the palace balcony and stated, “In front of German history, I declare my former homeland now a part of the Third Reich. One of the pearls of the Third Reich will be Vienna.” From that day on, Austrians were forbidden to say the word “Austria.”

Americans often wonder how Austria could so eagerly embrace Hitler. Let me hazard an explanation: Imagine post-WWI Austria. One of the mightiest empires on earth started — and lost — a great war. In a few bloody years, it went from being a grand empire of 55 million people to a relatively insignificant landlocked state of six million that was required to be nonaligned.

The capital, Vienna, was left with little to rule, and now its population comprised a third of the country’s. With the economic crisis we know as the Great Depression, Austria also got a fascist government complete with a dictator named Engelbert Dollfuss. He was as right-wing and anti-Semitic as Hitler, but he was pro-Roman Catholic Church, pro-Habsburg, and anti-Nazi. When an Austrian Nazi assassinated Dollfuss in 1934, it was easy for the German Nazis to take over four years later. By that point, the Austrian fascists had already put down the leftists. The German Nazis just took over their Austrian counterparts’ file cabinets. And, Hitler promised greatness again…and jobs…

 

Read the rest, and check out Rick’s travels through modern-day Vienna

 

 

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Energy Department invests millions to accelerate high-volume solar manufacturing

A $25 million federal grant will speed the construction of a solar manufacturing plant in San Diego, in an effort to boost U.S. competitiveness.

Semiconductor maker Soitec Solar, recipient of the Department of Energy grant, will pour the funds into equipment at its Rancho Bernando-area plant. Production is set to start before the end of the year on concentrated photovoltaic modules that use optical lenses to focus sunlight on tiny, highly efficient solar cells.

A publicly traded company based in Bernin, France, Soitec entered the concentrated photovoltaics business in 2009 with the purchase of Concentrix Solar, a spinoff of the Fraunhofer Institutes, a network of publicly funded research centers in Germany.

Soitec received the largest share of $37 million in Energy Department grants designed to accelerate high-volume solar manufacturing over the next two years.

 

More on this$25 million federal grant speeds solar factory construction

 

 

More about Soitec’s CPV (concentrated photovoltaic) modules:

Soitec’s CPV modules are built on Concentrix technology. They use Fresnel lenses to concentrate sunlight 500 times and focus it onto small, highly efficient multi-junction solar cells. This technology has helped us achieve world-leading AC system efficiency increases of 25% in actual operating conditions. This is almost twice as high as the efficiency increases achieved using conventional silicon systems.

 

Click for a video description of this technologyConcentrix Technology

 

 

 

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List of German expressions commonly used in English

  • Biergarten, open-air drinking establishment.
  • Blitz, taken from Blitzkrieg (lightning war). It is a team defensive play in American or Canadian football in which the defense sends more players than the offense can block.
  • Delicatessen, speciality food retailer, fine foods (German spelling Delikatessen)
  • Doppelgänger, literally double-goer, also spelled in English as doppelganger; a double or look-alike. However, in English the connotation is that of a ghostly apparition of a duplicate living person.
  • Ersatz, replacement; usually implying an artificial and inferior substitute or imitation.
  • Hamburger, sandwich with a meat patty and garnishments.
  • Hinterland
  • Iceberg (German Eisberg)
  • kaput (German spelling: kaputt), out-of-order, broken.
  • Karabiner, snaplink, a metal loop with a sprung or screwed gate, used in climbing and mountaineering; modern short form/derivation of the older word ‘Karabinerhaken’; translates to ‘riflehook’. The German word can also mean Carbine.
  • Kindergarten, literally children’s garden; day-care centre, playschool, preschool.
  • Kitsch, cheap, sentimental, gaudy items of popular culture.
  • Kohlrabi, type of cabbage.
  • Muesli, breakfast cereal (German spelling: Müesli or Müsli).
  • Neanderthal (modern German spelling: Neandertal), for German Neandertaler, meaning “of, from, or pertaining to the Neandertal (“Neander Valley”)”, the site near Düsseldorf where early Homo neanderthalensis fossils were found.
  • Nein — no.
  • Noodle, from German Nudel, a type of food; a string of pasta.
  • Poltergeist, literally noisy ghost; an alleged paranormal phenomenon where objects appear to move of their own accord.
  • Poodle, from German Pudel, breed of dog.
  • Pretzel (Standard German spelling: Brezel), flour and yeast based pastry.
  • Pumpernickel, type of sourdough rye bread, strongly flavoured, dense, and dark in colour.
  • Quartz (German Quarz)
  • Sauerkraut (sometimes shortened to Kraut), fermented cabbage.
  • Schadenfreude, joy from pain (literally harm joy); delight at the misfortune of others.
  • Schnaps, distilled beverage.
  • Spritzer, chilled drink from white wine and soda water (from spritzen = to spray).
  • Strudel (e. g. Apfelstrudel, milk-cream strudel), a filled pastry.
  • uber, über, over; used to indicate that something or someone is of better or superior magnitude, e.g. Übermensch.
  • verboten, prohibited, forbidden.
  • Wanderlust, the yearning to travel.
  • Wiener, hot dog (from Wiener Würstchen = Viennese sausage).
  • Wunderkind, literally wonder child; a child prodigy.
  • Zeitgeist, spirit of the time.

 

From Wikipedia

 

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40 of the most powerful photographs ever taken

BuzzFeed has pulled together 40 of the most powerful photos ever taken. Here are four of them:

Retired Philadelphia Police Captain Ray Lewis is arrested for participating in the Occupy Wall Street protests in 2011. (source: johnnymilano.com)

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European Union needs a President – says German Finance Minister

The European Union needs to become more integrated with a common finance policy and a central government, German finance minister Wolfgang Schaeuble said Wednesday (16 May).

“I would be for the further development of the European Commission into a government. I am for the election of a European president, he said at an event in Aachen, reports Reuters.

He said this is a longterm response to the current eurozone crisis, which many have said has been exacerbated by the fact that the EU lacked the tools – such as a central transfer system – to effectively deal with it.

“We certainly won’t manage it in this legislative period,” said Schauble referring to the creation of a finance ministry but noted that for a currency union, a part of finance policy needs to be harmonised.

That should be the “lesson” learned from the current crisis.

He said he wants to widen citizens participation in EU politics beyond voting for MEPs to voting for the president of the European Commission, noting that the recent French presidential elections, including a three-hour TV debate between the two candidates, attracted interest far beyond the country’s borders.

via EU Observer

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Berlin cracks the startup code

“We looked at each other and knew in that moment that we’d be crazy not to move here,” says Ciarán O’Leary, a partner at the German venture capital firm Earlybird. “There was just so much happening—founders everywhere, in every bar, cafe, every corner.”

Berlin…has become a global tech hub, one which foreign money discovered years ago. According to data from Thomson Reuters, 103 Internet startups received global venture capital funding in Germany in 2011, more than in any country besides China and the U.S. Although the numbers are not broken down by city, Berlin is where most German startups congregate.

Encouraged by all the interest—and the money—many Berliners have gotten startup fever. The Berlin Chamber of Commerce reports that 1,300 Internet startups have been founded in the city since 2008, 500 of them last year alone.

 

keep reading at Bloomberg BusinessWeek

Award winning short film, CatCam, documents the mysterious life a cat outside the house

Mr. Lee, an adopted stray cat, routinely disappeared from his South Carolina home for days on end. Intrigued by Mr. Lee’s whereabouts, his owner Juergen, a German engineer, created a camera designed to fit around the feline’s neck. Engineered to capture continuous photographs, Juergen hoped to discover the mysterious life of his cat. After many unsuccessful attempts, Mr. Lee returned with the camera in tact and photographic evidence of his travels. Intrigued by his findings, Juergen published the photographs on the internet, unaware that his small invention would send shockwaves around the world and alter his life forever.

 

CatCamTheMovie.com

 

Thx to Laughing Squid