Tag Archives: words

Meet the ‘bots’ of Wikipedia

ClueBot NG, as the bot is known, resides on a computer from which it sallies forth into the vast encyclopaedia to detect and clean up vandalism almost as soon as it occurs.

It is one of several hundred bots patrolling Wikipedia at any given time. Its role in repairing the Supreme Court article illustrates how bots have quietly become an indispensable – if virtually invisible – part of the Wikipedia project.

“Wikipedia would be a shambles without bots,” a Wikipedia administrator known on the site as Hersfold writes in an email.

English Wikipedia alone surpassed four million articles this month. It contains an estimated 2.5 billion words, equivalent to millions of pages, and it is 50 times larger than the Encyclopaedia Britannica.

But the project is so vast, and its maintenance so labour-intensive that it defies the capability of its human administrators and editors to keep it in order.

That is where the bots come in.

 

Keep reading: BBC News Magazine - Meet the ‘bots’ that edit Wikipedia

 

 

 

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List of German expressions commonly used in English

  • Biergarten, open-air drinking establishment.
  • Blitz, taken from Blitzkrieg (lightning war). It is a team defensive play in American or Canadian football in which the defense sends more players than the offense can block.
  • Delicatessen, speciality food retailer, fine foods (German spelling Delikatessen)
  • Doppelgänger, literally double-goer, also spelled in English as doppelganger; a double or look-alike. However, in English the connotation is that of a ghostly apparition of a duplicate living person.
  • Ersatz, replacement; usually implying an artificial and inferior substitute or imitation.
  • Hamburger, sandwich with a meat patty and garnishments.
  • Hinterland
  • Iceberg (German Eisberg)
  • kaput (German spelling: kaputt), out-of-order, broken.
  • Karabiner, snaplink, a metal loop with a sprung or screwed gate, used in climbing and mountaineering; modern short form/derivation of the older word ‘Karabinerhaken’; translates to ‘riflehook’. The German word can also mean Carbine.
  • Kindergarten, literally children’s garden; day-care centre, playschool, preschool.
  • Kitsch, cheap, sentimental, gaudy items of popular culture.
  • Kohlrabi, type of cabbage.
  • Muesli, breakfast cereal (German spelling: Müesli or Müsli).
  • Neanderthal (modern German spelling: Neandertal), for German Neandertaler, meaning “of, from, or pertaining to the Neandertal (“Neander Valley”)”, the site near Düsseldorf where early Homo neanderthalensis fossils were found.
  • Nein — no.
  • Noodle, from German Nudel, a type of food; a string of pasta.
  • Poltergeist, literally noisy ghost; an alleged paranormal phenomenon where objects appear to move of their own accord.
  • Poodle, from German Pudel, breed of dog.
  • Pretzel (Standard German spelling: Brezel), flour and yeast based pastry.
  • Pumpernickel, type of sourdough rye bread, strongly flavoured, dense, and dark in colour.
  • Quartz (German Quarz)
  • Sauerkraut (sometimes shortened to Kraut), fermented cabbage.
  • Schadenfreude, joy from pain (literally harm joy); delight at the misfortune of others.
  • Schnaps, distilled beverage.
  • Spritzer, chilled drink from white wine and soda water (from spritzen = to spray).
  • Strudel (e. g. Apfelstrudel, milk-cream strudel), a filled pastry.
  • uber, über, over; used to indicate that something or someone is of better or superior magnitude, e.g. Übermensch.
  • verboten, prohibited, forbidden.
  • Wanderlust, the yearning to travel.
  • Wiener, hot dog (from Wiener Würstchen = Viennese sausage).
  • Wunderkind, literally wonder child; a child prodigy.
  • Zeitgeist, spirit of the time.

 

From Wikipedia

 

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Sorkinisms – the viral video of recurring Aaron Sorkin dialogue

 

This video is a tribute to the work of Aaron Sorkin: the recycled dialogue, recurring phrases, and familiar plot lines. This is not intended as a critique but rather a playful excursion through Sorkin’s wonderful world of words.

- @KevinTPorter

Scenes taken from:

  • Malice
  • A Few Good Men
  • Bulworth
  • Sports Night
  • The West Wing
  • Studio 60
  • Charlie Wilson’s War
  • The Social Network
  • & Tom Hanks 1993 Oscar Speech for some reason