Profile of Pinterest users – interests, favorite stores, vacation spots, and metrics

Pinterest is still growing with more 20 million users and 1.9 billion views worldwide. And the average user spends an astounding 14 minutes on the site. Most of these pinners are ages 25-54 and largely female – 79% female to 21% male.

Their interests are:

  1. Visual Arts & Design
  2. Crafts
  3. Hobbies & Leisure
  4. Baked Goods
  5. Interior Decoration

 

And, their favorite stores.

  1. Victoria’s Secret
  2. Sephora USA
  3. Barneys New York
  4. Williams-Sonoma
  5. Nordstrom

 

Favorite places to visit.

  1. DisneyWorld
  2. Florida
  3. Las Vegas
  4. Chicago
  5. New York

 

Finally, Pinterest users spend $100 more than users of Facebook and Twitter – when clicking through a link to make a purchase.

  • Pinterest – $180
  • Facebook – $80
  • Twitter – $70

 

Source: Infographic – The Astounding Power of Pinterest

 

Continue reading Profile of Pinterest users – interests, favorite stores, vacation spots, and metrics

In the internet era of Super Bowl commercials, “things have changed”

Things have changed in Super Bowl advertising. It used to be about a one time hit for 30 seconds or 60 seconds in the middle of the show. And increasingly we’re trying to create a sort of two-week buzz.

The way in which people advertise in the Super Bowl was kind of developed before there was an Internet. One of the things that we did last year — and I don’t think we’re overstating it by saying we pioneered this — is we pre-released our ad.

This year, of course what’s happened is everyone will pre-release. I suspect there will not be an ad you’ll see on the Super Bowl that wasn’t available online. So our feeling was if you want to stay ahead of the curve — if no one is pre-releasing, let’s pre-release; if everyone is pre-releasing, let’s do a pre-pre-release.

– Mark Hunter, via Marketplace

 

The original pre-released ad that started it all

In the internet era of Super Bowl commercials, "things have changed"

Things have changed in Super Bowl advertising. It used to be about a one time hit for 30 seconds or 60 seconds in the middle of the show. And increasingly we’re trying to create a sort of two-week buzz.

The way in which people advertise in the Super Bowl was kind of developed before there was an Internet. One of the things that we did last year — and I don’t think we’re overstating it by saying we pioneered this — is we pre-released our ad.

This year, of course what’s happened is everyone will pre-release. I suspect there will not be an ad you’ll see on the Super Bowl that wasn’t available online. So our feeling was if you want to stay ahead of the curve — if no one is pre-releasing, let’s pre-release; if everyone is pre-releasing, let’s do a pre-pre-release.

– Mark Hunter, via Marketplace

 

The original pre-released ad that started it all