San Diego’s Comic-Con is becoming the Sundance/Cannes for television

Think of it as TV’s Comic-Cannes.

Since its inception 42 years ago, Comic-Con International has been a celebration of fanboy culture. When geek became the new cool, it also worked as a marketing platform for Hollywood and video game makers. Now, it’s the place where the television industry comes to build buzz for new shows and reward the audiences of established ones.

More than 80 television series courted the crowds at Comic-Con last year with premieres, panels and promotional events. This year in San Diego, the numbers are just as high – and the visibility even greater.

“It’s become a tentpole for us,” says Richard Licata, executive vice president, communications, for NBC Entertainment and Universal Television, echoing the sentiments of many network and studio marketing and publicity heads. “It’s the Super Bowl of response.”

Timing has something to do with it; the dates of Comic-Con make it a perfect place to preview fall shows. Corralling the talent is also a breeze – television has no Sundance or Cannes, making Comic-Con one of the few places on the planet where a television writer is treated like a rock star by screaming thousands.

 

Source: Hero Complex – Comic-Con: Television is a conquering hero

 

 

Continue reading San Diego’s Comic-Con is becoming the Sundance/Cannes for television

The rise of girl culture – Hunger Games to blow away box office

First Harry Potter, then Twilight, and now Hunger Games. Female authors and female fans are rising.

Based on the enormity of tracking for The Hunger Games,  the Lionsgate movie has the potential to score one of the top debuts of all time at the domestic box office.

Rarely does a film generate the sort of numbers that Hunger Games is enjoying. When the movie–based on Suzanne Collins‘ wildly popular young-adult novel–first popped up on tracking two weeks ago, the scores were so good that box-office observers and exhibitors immediately predicted an opening in the $70 million to $100 million range, with most betting on the higher number.

Hunger Games, which opens March 23, is even tracking better than The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn Part 1. That film opened in November to $138.1 million, the fifth-best debut of all time domestically.

via THR

 

To which the writers at ComicBook.com explain as the result of a brilliant marketing campaign from Lionsgate:

Lionsgate’s Marketing. At this point, the marketing campaign for this film should be put in a top 10 ALL TIME.  Yes, all time.  From an outstanding Twitter campaign, advance showing contests, incorporating charity with the film, and brilliantly releasing photos, interviews, and clips, Lionsgate has transformed the audience for “The Hunger Games.  A little over 3 months ago, this film was a niche film that was going to bring in respectable numbers on the backs of hardcore fans.  As of today, the audience now includes massively growing numbers of folks that haven’t read the books.  And Lionsgate did this on the cheap.  They didn’t toss out millions on a Super Bowl Commercial and crash the airwaves with ad after ad (like Disney did with “John Carter”). They did it with new media, and by empowering potential moviegoers.  The audience was part of this campaign, and as a result, they’ll see the film out of loyalty.  It’s a campaign that will be taught in film schools for years to come—or it should be.

via ComicBook.com

 

Valid points, all of them, but I still think they, Hollywood, and the entire country are missing something: the rise of the teenage girl.

Just like the teenage boy, and his brother (adult males, age 18-34), have dominated our pop culture landscape since the late 80s, I think we are witnessing the eruption of teenage girls onto the scene.

Some numbers:

Interest among younger women in Hunger Games is now at 45 percent, compared with 36 percent for Breaking Dawn. Among female over the age of 25, interest is 29 percent, versus 27 percent for Breaking Dawn.

One advantage that Hunger Games has over Summit Entertainment’s blockbuster Twilight franchise is male interest.

Monday’s tracking showed that Interest in Hunger Games among males younger than 25 was a healthy 28 percent, compared to 10 percent for Breaking Dawn. Interest among males over 25 was 20 percent, versus 8 percent for the fourth Twilight film.

via THR

 

The latter numbers show that male interest in female writers with female heroines, like in Hunger Games, can attract growing groups of men.

Even more, the former numbers show that nearly half of all teenage girls in the U.S. want to see this movie, as do nearly one out of three adult females.

Long live the rise of girl culture.