San Diego’s Comic-Con is becoming the Sundance/Cannes for television

Think of it as TV’s Comic-Cannes.

Since its inception 42 years ago, Comic-Con International has been a celebration of fanboy culture. When geek became the new cool, it also worked as a marketing platform for Hollywood and video game makers. Now, it’s the place where the television industry comes to build buzz for new shows and reward the audiences of established ones.

More than 80 television series courted the crowds at Comic-Con last year with premieres, panels and promotional events. This year in San Diego, the numbers are just as high – and the visibility even greater.

“It’s become a tentpole for us,” says Richard Licata, executive vice president, communications, for NBC Entertainment and Universal Television, echoing the sentiments of many network and studio marketing and publicity heads. “It’s the Super Bowl of response.”

Timing has something to do with it; the dates of Comic-Con make it a perfect place to preview fall shows. Corralling the talent is also a breeze – television has no Sundance or Cannes, making Comic-Con one of the few places on the planet where a television writer is treated like a rock star by screaming thousands.

 

Source: Hero Complex – Comic-Con: Television is a conquering hero

 

 

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Comic-Con Turns Geeks into Hollywood Kingmakers

“Everything I learned about the movie business I learned at Comic-Con.”

Jon Favreau

Walking around San Diego for the 2011 Comic Con is an experience like no other. It combines the crowds and energy of SXSW with the geekiness of opening night at Harry Potter.

There are costumes galore with (my favorite) girls as sexy evil villains, stormtroopers, ghostbusters, goths, and geeks — and it’s, in a word, awesome.

You can buy comic book art, comic books, legendary toys, video games, and mingle like it’s nerd cocktail hour.

The big deal, though, is Hollywood. The industry has taken over the event. Every celebrity actor, director, agent, and writer shows up. This year Steven Speilberg and Peter Jackson wowed a Con audience with a dual-appearance. They spend millions on everything from sneak peek trailers, to gigantic booths and exclusive parties.

And, we love it.

If you’re at all intrigued you must read the article below.

It’s a personal account from Jon Favreau, the actor (Swingers, PCU) and writer/director (Elf, Iron Man, Cowboys & Aliens), on his experiences of both bombing and killing it.

He gives some insight into how movies have intersected with this Con and turned the geeks into king-makers.

“The energy hit me in the sternum like a wrecking ball. The feeling in that room created a flood of endorphins that took hours to dissipate from my brainpan. After showing the clip a second time, I ran off the stage, and a year before that movie ever made it into theaters, Iron Man was a hit. Any misgivings about the new studio, the director or the casting of Robert Downey Jr. as Tony Stark seemed to evaporate in those few, precious moments. By the time Downey took the stage on Saturday during the Marvel panel, he was welcomed as one of their own.”

read the full article at The Hollywood Reporter