Buy in bulk and save – AT&T and Verizon offer big savings through family plans

It finally happened, the telecom’s have given up their silly (and greedy) attempts to charge us through the roof for voice and text messages. All you have to do is switch over to their new family plans. It’s the new buy in bulk Costco business model.

A few weeks ago, Verizon released their Share Everything Plan, and now AT&T has answered back with the Mobile Share Plan (T-Mobile too).

Both marginalize making phone calls and sending text messages. Allowing you to send unlimited of both while switching the focus to data plans, where they have established tiers to charge you per gigabyte.

On a side note, it appears that both companies want to put the screws on individual plans. Most of which are still at $100/person while the family plan rate is $50-70/person. Even more so now that they removed the 5 device limit on the plans; now with a 10 device limit allowing even greater bulk savings.

One reason for this big family-push is possibly a strategy to prevent defections, after all it is much harder to move to another company when that also means leaving your family.

But does the new plan save any money?

For my family, no, unless we can pull in more family members.

 

The Breakdown

My family is on AT&T and currently has four out of six family members on one plan. The current cost for the four of us is $240.00/mo. We have one extra feature, unlimited messaging, for $30/mo. This ends up costing each of us $60/mo.

The break down:

Phone #1 (primary line)

  • Family Talk, 700 minutes – $60
  • Text messaging unlimited – $30
  • Unlimited data – $30
  • Total = $120

Phones #2, #3, #4

  • Family Talk, 700 minutes – $10
  • Unlimited data – $30
  • Total = $40 (x3)

 

Under AT&T’s new plan, our total cost would be – $260 and that breaks down to $65/mo per person.

  • 6GB – $90
  • Smartphone – $35 x 4 = $140
  • Unlimited talk/text – $30

 

Which means we won’t be making the change…unless we add another phone to our plan. With five phones our total cost would be $295 and that would cost $59/mo per person.

  • 6GB – $90
  • Smartphone – $35 x 5 = $175
  • Unlimited talk/text – $30

 

And, in case you’re wondering if we add that sixth line the cost person would go down to $55/mo.

Maybe it’s time to wrangle together the whole family under one plan.

 

Continue reading Buy in bulk and save – AT&T and Verizon offer big savings through family plans

Sign up for Google Fiber get a free Nexus tablet, or super-cheap internet for $3.57/mo

Today may very well live in infamy as the day the cable companies died. Internet giant Google announced its new, groundbreaking Google Fiber, a broadband service that will bring breakneck 1Gbps internet speed to Kansas City — service far faster and far cheaper than that offered by traditional cable companies.

How fast is Google’s 1Gbps service? Competitor Comcast recently announced it would launch 305Mbps speed service to much of the Northeast at a cost of $299.95 per month…at 1,000 Mbps, Google Fiber cost of just $70 per month.

Google Fiber allows you to combine your cable TV and internet service into one product, for just $120 per month. Getting service to your house will require you pay a $300 service initiation fee — a fee that’s waved if you agree to keep Google Fiber service for a minimum of two years.

And the remote control for your Google Fiber TV service? It’s a Nexus 7 tablet.

If you’re looking for a lower priced internet option, Google Fiber has you covered there, too. Anyone who pays the $300 connection fee can opt to receive 5Mbps service for free for seven years. That’s an unheard of bargain — you can essentially buy seven years’ worth of internet service for just $3.57 a month.

 

Keep reading: Tecca – Google launches Google Fiber, 1Gbps broadband service 100 times faster than what you have now

 

 

Continue reading Sign up for Google Fiber get a free Nexus tablet, or super-cheap internet for $3.57/mo

White House creates – U.S. Ignite program – to make internet 90% cheaper and start building gigabit networks

The President is set to sign an executive order today (June 13, 2012) that aims to cut the cost of broadband construction across federal roadways and properties by up to 90 percent. The White House is also is looking to improve “next-generation applications and (the) digital experience,” running on networks that are a heady 100 times faster than what’s in use today.

Called – U.S. Ignite – the partnership aims to push the growth of next-generation broadband networks, teaming up with over 100 start-ups, universities and existing tech companies like HP, Comcast and Verizon for the project.

The National Science Foundation has thrown in $250 million to assist the partnership’s creation of a national 1-gigabit network that would connect together academic and developer hubs.

Mozilla has decided to team up with the foundation to offer up a $500,000 prize pot for developers looking to help create the “internet of the future”.

via Engadget

 

Follow the U.S. Ignite program on: FacebookTwitter

Continue reading White House creates – U.S. Ignite program – to make internet 90% cheaper and start building gigabit networks

Verizon is bringing 10x speed increase to cities – 100Gbps networks

Verizon already has 100Gbps (gigabit-per-second) connections over its optical core networks across continents. Now the carrier is bringing that speed to its metro networks, which enterprises tap into for high-speed data connections. The metro networks so far have been limited to 10Gbps or 40Gbps.

Though the carrier doesn’t expect many customers to start ordering 100Gbps connections soon, it is preparing for the future.

Verizon’s 100-gigabit U.S. backbone technology forms the basis of a high-speed, low-latency network for financial trades that was inaugurated between Chicago and New York last month. It can complete a stock trade in as little as 14.5 milliseconds, according to the carrier.

***

Verizon said it has begun to use the same general architecture for high-speed land-based networks that it already uses for its connections across oceans. That architecture, based on a mesh of cables, gives traffic across its core network more alternate routes to take if one cable breaks. This is a step up from a ring architecture, in which the network recovers by sending bits the other way around the ring if one spot on it is damaged.

Verizon already has mesh networks across the Pacific and across the Atlantic, each with eight alternate paths.

via Network World

 

// Photo – sz.u.

Apple has staged a massive comeback, stopping Android…for now

In the past three months, Nielsen says, Apple has grabbed a 43% share of the smartphones sold in the U.S.

Android’s share has increased versus a year ago–it still leads the market with 48%–but Android’s share gains appear to have stalled.

Apple’s gains are the result of a few key factors, all of which demonstrate that Apple learned a searing lesson from its failure in the 1990s PC market:

  • In the U.S., Apple has finally broadened distribution of the iPhone to Verizon and Sprint, instead of just selling through AT&T.
  • Apple introduced a “low-price” version of the iPhone.
  • Broadened its distribution channels to major retailers like Walmart, Amazon, and Best Buy.
  • Dominating the global tablet market.

via Business Insider

 

Thx to Nicholas Carson