Tag Archives: recycled

Zero Waste: the recycled toothbrush

Here is another way to reduce your trash on your way to Zero Waste – the recycled toothbrush. It looks, acts, and feels like a normal toothbrush, but when you are done with it you replace the head instead of throwing the whole thing out. You can buy replacement heads in packs of 3, 6 and it comes in sensitive, soft, and medium bristle strength. They’re usually completely recyclable and made of recycled materials.

It’s a rather genius idea and I’m not sure why it hasn’t caught on already. I’ve been using mine for nearly 3 years (the same brush) and have switched out the head several times. Here is the brand I use:

 

Eco-Dent Terradent 31 Toothbrush

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An airplane is retired every 17 hours – one man decides to recycle one, turns it into a home

“Humanity is not yet discovering how to use these glorious birds,” Bill Campbell.

 

Bill Campbell opens one of nine exits in the Boeing 727-200 that he converted into a home in rural Hillsboro, Oregon. He acquired the jet (for $100,000) at the end of its flying life from Olympic Airways in Greece, had it flown from Athens to Oregon, and finally towed to his land.

 

 

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The best pictures of June from National Geographic

Nik Wallenda, of the “Flying Wallendas” acrobatic dynasty, walks 1,800 feet (550 meters) across Niagara Falls by tightrope on June 15—a first. (Frank Gunn, Canadian Press/AP)

 

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Sorkinisms – the viral video of recurring Aaron Sorkin dialogue

 

This video is a tribute to the work of Aaron Sorkin: the recycled dialogue, recurring phrases, and familiar plot lines. This is not intended as a critique but rather a playful excursion through Sorkin’s wonderful world of words.

- @KevinTPorter

Scenes taken from:

  • Malice
  • A Few Good Men
  • Bulworth
  • Sports Night
  • The West Wing
  • Studio 60
  • Charlie Wilson’s War
  • The Social Network
  • & Tom Hanks 1993 Oscar Speech for some reason

Zero-waste moving – Recopack moving boxes – made from recycled plastic trash

Welcome to Rent A Green Box, the first Zero-Waste pack and move solution in America!

Do you ever wonder why we’re cutting down our trees to make cardboard moving boxes that are used once, maybe twice, and then tossed into a landfill? After all, cardboard boxes aren’t just wasteful and inefficient, they’re also expensive, hard to tape, hard to stack, easily crushed, dirty and dusty. With over 16% of the population packing and moving each year, don’t you think it’s time for a CHANGE?

Be part of the “green” solution

You have the ability to choose between disposability and sustainability – and you’ll be excited to learn that choosing sustainability and moving green actually saves you money!

  • Cut your moving costs in half.
  • Recopacks, are made from recycled plastic trash.
  • Delivered for free, direct to your door and then picked up for free after you have them all unpacked.
  • They’ve got comfortable handles, stack perfectly, are easily locked during transport.

Prices:

  • Studio – $99 for 5 medium, 17 large, 3 extra-large (new cardboard $129)
  • Small – $149 for 10 medium, 30 large, 10 extra-large (new cardboard $219)
  • Medium – $229 for 20 medium, 40 large, 15 extra-large (new cardboard $319)
  • Large – $269 for 30 medium, 50 large, 20 extra-large (new cardboard $398)

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Are cars causing Global Warming?

I often hear folks complain about cars and the pollution they cause. This seemed a little off so I did some investigating.

Out of all the ways to go green, including reducing energy use, buying green products, and driving less…

 

Which one is the best for the environment?

 

The EPA keeps a tally of these things on their Climate Change page and in an Inventory of US Greenhouse Gas Emissions (pdf).

The results are astounding. Cars account for only 17% of all emissions. While 80% comes from home use, business, and food.

 

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2009 US Greenhouse Gas Emissions

  • Business — 35.6%
  • Electricity — 33%
  • Personal vehicles — 17.8%
  • Agriculture — 7%
  • Residential — 5%
  • US territories — 1%

* Business = factories, business vehicles, office buildings
** Residential = gas heating
*** Includes CO2 and all other gasses 

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To put it another way. If you buy a recycled product or reduce your energy use, that has 2x greater impact than driving less does.

This means things like hang drying your clothes, buying recycled toilet paper, reusing floss, and turning off the A/C, are much more important than biking to work.

I know, I know, this just doesn’t seem right.

The numbers don’t lie…so next time you get in the car think, instead, about how you can reduce your energy use or buy a sustainably created product.

 

More on the Numbers

 

If you think about driving, most of the recommendations are for health concerns instead of pollution problems. Things like biking to work and reducing traffic congestion. Or, it is about geopolitics and our reliance on other countries for oil.

The thing is, most of the car industry is green and even innovative. There are smog checks, 40 mpg cars, engine filters galore, a huge used car industries (i.e. reuse), and awesome junkyards (recycle).

From the top, where the rich subsidize the innovations like electric cars. To the bottom, where the middle and poor buy used to save money. The entire industry appears to have itself aligned in an environmental way.

Compare that to the energy industry and green product market where that alignment isn’t quite there yet. Buying a used car saves money and helps the entire industry, and it is considered cool/smart. Whereas, buying recycled or hang drying your clothes makes you kind of extreme, and not all locations offer products.

Not to mention the incentives are tiny. The pennies and dimes I save in electricity use make me to question the extra effort. The only thing that keeps me going is “think of the kids”, lol.

This may be a good place for smart government. A good example would be the car industry, where those who drive a lot or purchase low MPG cars pay much more at the pump. They also pay more taxes and if you look at how much tax is loaded into each gallon, it’s a lot.

Perhaps there could be an extra tax on those who use more electricity. Make those who own big houses or a million appliances pay more. Use that money to fund clean energy projects.

I’m seeing this happen in a few regions but not at the scale where it needs to be. I say tax the hell out of wasters and over-users otherwise it makes all my reductions inconsequential.

Plus, it sure would be nice to get rid of these coal and gas power plants…

 

Which one would you rather have in your backyard?