Tag Archives: workplace

California bans employers from demanding your password for Email, Twitter, Facebook

From California Governor Jerry Brown:

“Today I am signing Assembly Bill 1844 and Senate Bill 1349, which prohibit universities and employers from demanding your email and social media passwords,” he wrote in a Facebook post. “California pioneered the social media revolution. These laws protect Californians from unwarranted invasions of their social media accounts.”

I didn’t know this was a problem, companies demanding passwords from employees for their email, Twitter, and Facebook accounts. I can’t imagine how this would come up and how I would react. Though, I have heard stories and there are, from c|net, “more than 100 cases currently before the National Labor Relations Board that involve employer workplace policies around social media.”

Good to see this practice banned before it becomes more widespread.

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Californians create record-low trash in 2011 – still more than national average

From a high of 6.3 pounds of trash per day in 2005, Californians have lowered their output in 2011 to a record-low of 4.4 pounds/day. Good news for the state with the highest population, and yet compared to the national average – 4.4 pounds – that’s not much of a drop, more like stopping the excess.

But don’t count out Californians yet – the numbers show strong a downward trend that may leave the rest of the country behind. The state diversion rate (recycling, compost) is 65% – among the highest in the country – with plans for 75% by 2020. In comparison, the country is only at 34% – meaning some states must have horribly low rates.

There is also a strong downward trend among Californians and their trash. The drop was 30% – 1.9 pounds – in the last 5 years, while the rest of the country dropped 0.24 pounds in that same time. And the government is hoping to continue this decline – as the economy bounces back – by signing into law AB 341.

Which among many new rules, forces businesses to start recycling – the only sore spot in this story. At work Californians produce 11.3 pounds of trash – much more than at home. This is largely due to workplace practices that don’t promote recycling and state laws that let office buildings avoid recycling. This new law should remedy that.

 

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Facebook's new office of endless snacks, cozies, and "hack out" spaces

Facebook’s new campus is up and the employees are moving in. Here are some insights into the goodies they have laid out:

The whole campus is connected through a central courtyard.  Right now it’s still filled with bulldozers and dirt, but when it’s finished, we’ll have two full-service cafes, two coffee shops, on-site doctors, a fitness center, and much more.  And as always, we still offer other perks like free dry cleaning and endless snacks in our micro-kitchens.

There are no private offices or cubicles.  We tore down those unnecessary walls so that everyone could sit out in the open with their teams.  We’ve scattered hundreds of conference rooms and “cozies”—little breakaway spaces filled with couches and brightly colored chairs—throughout the buildings.  As people run into each other in hallways or at the micro-kitchens, it’s important that they can quickly duck away somewhere if they want to chat or hash out ideas.

We’ve always believed in “hacking out” our space—putting up posters and scribbling ideas on the walls—so we lined the hallways with chalkboard paint and put a box of chalk on everyone’s desk.

We’ve sponsored Zimride to come to the wider city of Menlo Park and help their residents find rideshare opportunities, and soon we’ll launch Facebucks, a program that incentivizes employees to get out, enjoy and spend money in downtown Menlo Park.

We’re pursuing a LEED Gold certification—we offer recycling and composting bins everywhere for employees, and we’ve reused as much of the existing structure as possible.  For instance, there isn’t a single new door on the campus—they’ve all been recycled from those used by our predecessors.

We also offer a robust transportation program that provides alternatives to single-car commuting, including free shuttles from the surrounding areas, vanpools, (and) bicycles. Over 47% of our employees use one of these programs.  In fact, even as we grow, we don’t plan to add a single new parking space to the existing campus.

Our New Menlo Park Home

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Facebook’s new office of endless snacks, cozies, and “hack out” spaces

Facebook’s new campus is up and the employees are moving in. Here are some insights into the goodies they have laid out:

The whole campus is connected through a central courtyard.  Right now it’s still filled with bulldozers and dirt, but when it’s finished, we’ll have two full-service cafes, two coffee shops, on-site doctors, a fitness center, and much more.  And as always, we still offer other perks like free dry cleaning and endless snacks in our micro-kitchens.

There are no private offices or cubicles.  We tore down those unnecessary walls so that everyone could sit out in the open with their teams.  We’ve scattered hundreds of conference rooms and “cozies”—little breakaway spaces filled with couches and brightly colored chairs—throughout the buildings.  As people run into each other in hallways or at the micro-kitchens, it’s important that they can quickly duck away somewhere if they want to chat or hash out ideas.

We’ve always believed in “hacking out” our space—putting up posters and scribbling ideas on the walls—so we lined the hallways with chalkboard paint and put a box of chalk on everyone’s desk.

We’ve sponsored Zimride to come to the wider city of Menlo Park and help their residents find rideshare opportunities, and soon we’ll launch Facebucks, a program that incentivizes employees to get out, enjoy and spend money in downtown Menlo Park.

We’re pursuing a LEED Gold certification—we offer recycling and composting bins everywhere for employees, and we’ve reused as much of the existing structure as possible.  For instance, there isn’t a single new door on the campus—they’ve all been recycled from those used by our predecessors.

We also offer a robust transportation program that provides alternatives to single-car commuting, including free shuttles from the surrounding areas, vanpools, (and) bicycles. Over 47% of our employees use one of these programs.  In fact, even as we grow, we don’t plan to add a single new parking space to the existing campus.

Our New Menlo Park Home

Continue reading