America regains the title of ‘fastest supercomputer on the planet’

Every six months, Earth’s biggest supercomputers have a giant race to see which can lay claim to being the world’s fastest high-performance computing cluster.

In the latest Top 500 Supercomputer Sites list unveiled Monday morning, a newly assembled cluster built with IBM hardware at the Department of Energy’s Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) takes the top prize. Its speed? A whopping 16.32 petaflops, or 16 thousand trillion calculations per second. With 96 racks, 98,304 compute nodes, 1.6 million cores, and 1.6 petabytes of memory across 4,500 square feet, the IBM Blue Gene/Q system installed at LLNL overtakes the 10-petaflop, 705,000-core “K computer” in Japan’s RIKEN Advanced Institute for Computational Science.

The Japanese computer had been world’s fastest twice in a row. Before that, the top spot was held by a Chinese system. The DOE computer, named “Sequoia,” was delivered to LLNL between January and April. It’s the first US system to be ranked #1 since November 2009.

To get to 16 petaflops, Sequoia ran the Linpack benchmark for 23 hours without a single core failing, LLNL division leader Kim Cupps told Ars Friday in advance of the list’s release. The system is capable of hitting more than 20 petaflops—during the tests it ran at 81 percent efficiency.
Learn moreWith 16 petaflops and 1.6M cores, DOE supercomputer is world’s fastest

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California moves forward with renewable energy projects in National Parks

U.S. Senator Barbara Boxer (D-CA) today praised the agreement reached by Southern California Edison and the National Park Service to connect more than 20 existing renewable energy projects at Park Service facilities in California to the electric grid. Southern California Edison is also close to finalizing agreements with the Department of Veterans Affairs and the Forest Service to ensure that clean energy projects at their facilities are soon connected to the grid.

Senator Boxer wrote a letter to Southern California Edison last month requesting that the utility move without delay to execute interconnection agreements for dozens of projects that had been waiting for up to two and a half years to connect to the grid.

The renewable energy projects are located in the following National Park Service units in California: Death Valley National Park, Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area, Channel Islands National Park, Mojave National Preserve and Sequoia & Kings Canyon National Parks.

via Barbara Boxer

 

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