Seaside living – “doesn’t anybody around here work?”

As a coastal resident I found this piece humorous and apropos:

 

Seaside living and the illusion of leisure

…in short, we work 희비전 다운로드. This is the dirty little secret of seaside living. Everyone around us may be on vacation, but that doesn’t mean we get a holiday. People move here imagining that life is just one long afternoon under a beach umbrella 다운로드. They stop for lunch and look out onto our sidewalks and think, “Don’t people here need to earn a living?”

Yes, we do. Those window-shoppers 사랑의 불시착 5회 다운로드? Other tourists.

 

This rings even more true for me since I work from home. I set my schedule around the crowds and that means I tend to work on Friday nights and all weekend long 3dp 칩. I have my fun on a Tuesday afternoon and run errands at 10am on a Wednesday.

It beats the hustle and bustle, but also prompts the question, “Don’t you work?”

 

 

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Caught by the paparazzi – Prince William & Harry bodyboarding in Cornwall

윈도우 8.1 pro 다운로드

While his wife Kate and her sister Pippa Middleton were at Wimbledon, Prince William and his brother Harry spent the weekend with friends in Cornwall, body-boarding and hanging out in the local pubs 다운로드.

No strangers to the surf, the princes have spent the summers of their youth in the area around the small seaside resort of Polzeath. And even Prince Charles has been photographed along the shores in a wet suit 다운로드!

 

Source: People – Prince Harry & Prince William Frolic in the Surf

 

 

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An eco-house in Esenada, Mexico – built into a seaside cliff

An interesting concept for a beach home is profiled in the LA Times. The house is built into a cliff using “rammed-earth,” concrete slabs, and recycled materials 다운로드.

D’Acosta and Turrent began their two-year construction project by digging a foundation into the cliff, then constructing a perimeter of 3-foot-thick rammed-earth retaining walls 다운로드. They called the inner structure of earthen tunnels an “hormiguero,” or ants’ nest. A concrete slab hearth supports the weight of the wood floor and roof, “like a huge column supporting a bridge,” D’Acosta said 괴물 2006. The result is a 2,300-square-foot house with bohemian flair.

Another component of the home is recycled 100-year-old redwood planks from a bridge in Northern California 다운로드. The couple bought 200 of the timbers, each 27 feet long and 1 ton, from a salvage yard in Rosarito Beach.

See more pictures and details at LA Times