Amazon restarts the serial novel genre – with Charles Dickens and a Yoga murder mystery

I love that Amazon is rekindling the newspaper subscription through the e-reader. It invokes an image of reading the newspaper in the morning, with my coffee and family at the table. But replace the newspaper with a Kindle and does it still work?

If you’re a digital geek of course. And the beauty of online subscriptions is you have the world at your fingertips. I’ve subscribed to newspapers from Spain, Argentina, Houston, San Francisco, and more using the free 14-day trial.

Amazon sees a profit in this as they continue to push the subscription model, this time with Kindle Serials. From c|net:

A new service for Kindle owners, called Kindle Serials, lets customers subscribe to a serial novel. Buyers purchase the content up front, then have it delivered to their device automatically as new installments are published. Along the way, readers can provide feedback about the series, something Amazon hopes will bring a modern approach to the genre.

The first releases are a few Charles Dickens novels in their original serialized form. A true delight for literature nuts, especially because they are free:

Eight more serial novels will be released, each with a tantalizing plot to draw you in. These will cost $1.99 for all the installments.

 

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International Space Station has a Large Hadron Collider – and it’s collected 18 billion cosmic rays

The largest-ever experiment in space has reported the collection of some 18 billion “cosmic ray” events that may help unravel the Universe’s mysteries.

Run from a centre at Cern, the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) aims to spot dark matter and exotic antimatter.

At the heart of the seven-tonne, $2bn machine is a giant, specially designed magnet which bends the paths of extraordinarily high-energy charged particles called cosmic rays onto a series of detectors, giving hints of what the particles are.

A series of ever-larger particle accelerators built here on Earth aim to drive particles to ever-higher energies, smashing them into one another to simulate the same processes that create them elsewhere in the cosmos.

But no Earth-bound experiment can match nature’s power as a particle accelerator – and Earth’s atmosphere absorbs incoming cosmic rays – so the AMS will catch some of these high-energy particles “from the source”, as a kind of complement to the likes of the Large Hadron Collider.

 

Learn more: BBC – Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer claims huge cosmic ray haul

 

 

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